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H A DMakefilediff 6072b2c4 Sat Jul 31 20:53:46 MDT 2021 Masahiro Yamada <masahiroy@kernel.org> kbuild: warn if a different compiler is used for external module builds

It is always safe to use the same compiler for the kernel and external
modules, but in reality, some distributions such as Fedora release a
different version of GCC from the one used for building the kernel.

There was a long discussion about mixing different compilers [1].

I do not repeat it here, but at least, showing a heads up in that
case is better than nothing.

Linus suggested [2]:
And a warning might be more palatable even if different compiler
version work fine together. Just a heads up on "it looks like you
might be mixing compiler versions" is a valid note, and isn't
necessarily wrong. Even when they work well together, maybe you want
to have people at least _aware_ of it.

This commit shows a warning unless the compiler is exactly the same.

warning: the compiler differs from the one used to build the kernel
The kernel was built by: gcc (GCC) 11.1.1 20210531 (Red Hat 11.1.1-3)
You are using: gcc (GCC) 11.2.1 20210728 (Red Hat 11.2.1-1)

Check the difference, and if it is OK with you, please proceed at your
risk.

To avoid the locale issue as in commit bcbcf50f5218 ("kbuild: fix
ld-version.sh to not be affected by locale"), pass LC_ALL=C to
"$(CC) --version".

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-hardening/efe6b039a544da8215d5e54aa7c4b6d1986fc2b0.1611607264.git.jpoimboe@redhat.com/
[2] https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/CAHk-=wgjwhDy-y4mQh34L+2aF=n6BjzHdqAW2=8wri5x7O04pA@mail.gmail.com/

Acked-by: Josh Poimboeuf <jpoimboe@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Masahiro Yamada <masahiroy@kernel.org>
diff 6072b2c4 Sat Jul 31 20:53:46 MDT 2021 Masahiro Yamada <masahiroy@kernel.org> kbuild: warn if a different compiler is used for external module builds

It is always safe to use the same compiler for the kernel and external
modules, but in reality, some distributions such as Fedora release a
different version of GCC from the one used for building the kernel.

There was a long discussion about mixing different compilers [1].

I do not repeat it here, but at least, showing a heads up in that
case is better than nothing.

Linus suggested [2]:
And a warning might be more palatable even if different compiler
version work fine together. Just a heads up on "it looks like you
might be mixing compiler versions" is a valid note, and isn't
necessarily wrong. Even when they work well together, maybe you want
to have people at least _aware_ of it.

This commit shows a warning unless the compiler is exactly the same.

warning: the compiler differs from the one used to build the kernel
The kernel was built by: gcc (GCC) 11.1.1 20210531 (Red Hat 11.1.1-3)
You are using: gcc (GCC) 11.2.1 20210728 (Red Hat 11.2.1-1)

Check the difference, and if it is OK with you, please proceed at your
risk.

To avoid the locale issue as in commit bcbcf50f5218 ("kbuild: fix
ld-version.sh to not be affected by locale"), pass LC_ALL=C to
"$(CC) --version".

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-hardening/efe6b039a544da8215d5e54aa7c4b6d1986fc2b0.1611607264.git.jpoimboe@redhat.com/
[2] https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/CAHk-=wgjwhDy-y4mQh34L+2aF=n6BjzHdqAW2=8wri5x7O04pA@mail.gmail.com/

Acked-by: Josh Poimboeuf <jpoimboe@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Masahiro Yamada <masahiroy@kernel.org>
diff 6072b2c4 Sat Jul 31 20:53:46 MDT 2021 Masahiro Yamada <masahiroy@kernel.org> kbuild: warn if a different compiler is used for external module builds

It is always safe to use the same compiler for the kernel and external
modules, but in reality, some distributions such as Fedora release a
different version of GCC from the one used for building the kernel.

There was a long discussion about mixing different compilers [1].

I do not repeat it here, but at least, showing a heads up in that
case is better than nothing.

Linus suggested [2]:
And a warning might be more palatable even if different compiler
version work fine together. Just a heads up on "it looks like you
might be mixing compiler versions" is a valid note, and isn't
necessarily wrong. Even when they work well together, maybe you want
to have people at least _aware_ of it.

This commit shows a warning unless the compiler is exactly the same.

warning: the compiler differs from the one used to build the kernel
The kernel was built by: gcc (GCC) 11.1.1 20210531 (Red Hat 11.1.1-3)
You are using: gcc (GCC) 11.2.1 20210728 (Red Hat 11.2.1-1)

Check the difference, and if it is OK with you, please proceed at your
risk.

To avoid the locale issue as in commit bcbcf50f5218 ("kbuild: fix
ld-version.sh to not be affected by locale"), pass LC_ALL=C to
"$(CC) --version".

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-hardening/efe6b039a544da8215d5e54aa7c4b6d1986fc2b0.1611607264.git.jpoimboe@redhat.com/
[2] https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/CAHk-=wgjwhDy-y4mQh34L+2aF=n6BjzHdqAW2=8wri5x7O04pA@mail.gmail.com/

Acked-by: Josh Poimboeuf <jpoimboe@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Masahiro Yamada <masahiroy@kernel.org>
diff 5f6e0fe0 Wed Jun 09 20:03:31 MDT 2021 Masahiro Yamada <masahiroy@kernel.org> parisc: Fix compile failure when building 64-bit kernel natively

Commit 23243c1ace9f ("arch: use cross_compiling to check whether it is
a cross build or not") broke 64-bit parisc builds on 32-bit parisc
systems.

Helge mentioned:
- 64-bit parisc userspace is not supported yet [1]
- hppa gcc does not support "-m64" flag [2]

That means, parisc developers working on a 32-bit parisc machine need
to use hppa64-linux-gnu-gcc (cross compiler) for building the 64-bit
parisc kernel.

After the offending commit, gcc is used in such a case because
both $(SRCARCH) and $(SUBARCH) are 'parisc', hence cross_compiling is
unset.

A correct way is to introduce ARCH=parisc64 because building the 64-bit
parisc kernel on a 32-bit parisc system is not exactly a native build,
but rather a semi-cross build.

[1]: https://lore.kernel.org/linux-parisc/5dfd81eb-c8ca-b7f5-e80e-8632767c022d@gmx.de/#t
[2]: https://lore.kernel.org/linux-parisc/89515325-fc21-31da-d238-6f7a9abbf9a0@gmx.de/

Fixes: 23243c1ace9f ("arch: use cross_compiling to check whether it is a cross build or not")
Signed-off-by: Masahiro Yamada <masahiroy@kernel.org>
Reported-by: Meelis Roos <mroos@linux.ee>
Tested-by: Meelis Roos <mroos@linux.ee>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org> # v5.13+
Signed-off-by: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de>
diff 5f6e0fe0 Wed Jun 09 20:03:31 MDT 2021 Masahiro Yamada <masahiroy@kernel.org> parisc: Fix compile failure when building 64-bit kernel natively

Commit 23243c1ace9f ("arch: use cross_compiling to check whether it is
a cross build or not") broke 64-bit parisc builds on 32-bit parisc
systems.

Helge mentioned:
- 64-bit parisc userspace is not supported yet [1]
- hppa gcc does not support "-m64" flag [2]

That means, parisc developers working on a 32-bit parisc machine need
to use hppa64-linux-gnu-gcc (cross compiler) for building the 64-bit
parisc kernel.

After the offending commit, gcc is used in such a case because
both $(SRCARCH) and $(SUBARCH) are 'parisc', hence cross_compiling is
unset.

A correct way is to introduce ARCH=parisc64 because building the 64-bit
parisc kernel on a 32-bit parisc system is not exactly a native build,
but rather a semi-cross build.

[1]: https://lore.kernel.org/linux-parisc/5dfd81eb-c8ca-b7f5-e80e-8632767c022d@gmx.de/#t
[2]: https://lore.kernel.org/linux-parisc/89515325-fc21-31da-d238-6f7a9abbf9a0@gmx.de/

Fixes: 23243c1ace9f ("arch: use cross_compiling to check whether it is a cross build or not")
Signed-off-by: Masahiro Yamada <masahiroy@kernel.org>
Reported-by: Meelis Roos <mroos@linux.ee>
Tested-by: Meelis Roos <mroos@linux.ee>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org> # v5.13+
Signed-off-by: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de>
diff a82adfd5 Mon Apr 12 20:56:54 MDT 2021 Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org> hardening: Introduce CONFIG_ZERO_CALL_USED_REGS

When CONFIG_ZERO_CALL_USED_REGS is enabled, build the kernel with
"-fzero-call-used-regs=used-gpr" (in GCC 11). This option will zero any
caller-used register contents just before returning from a function,
ensuring that temporary values are not leaked beyond the function
boundary. This means that register contents are less likely to be
available for side channel attacks and information exposures.

Additionally this helps reduce the number of useful ROP gadgets in the
kernel image by about 20%:

$ ROPgadget.py --nosys --nojop --binary vmlinux.stock | tail -n1
Unique gadgets found: 337245

$ ROPgadget.py --nosys --nojop --binary vmlinux.zero-call-regs | tail -n1
Unique gadgets found: 267175

and more notably removes simple "write-what-where" gadgets:

$ ROPgadget.py --ropchain --binary vmlinux.stock | sed -n '/Step 1/,/Step 2/p'
- Step 1 -- Write-what-where gadgets

[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff8102d76c mov qword ptr [rsi], rdx ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81000cf5 pop rsi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff8104d7c8 pop rdx ; ret
[-] Can't find the 'xor rdx, rdx' gadget. Try with another 'mov [reg], reg'

[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff814c2b4c mov qword ptr [rsi], rdi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81000cf5 pop rsi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81001e51 pop rdi ; ret
[-] Can't find the 'xor rdi, rdi' gadget. Try with another 'mov [reg], reg'

[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81540d61 mov qword ptr [rsi], rdi ; pop rbx ; pop rbp ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81000cf5 pop rsi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81001e51 pop rdi ; ret
[-] Can't find the 'xor rdi, rdi' gadget. Try with another 'mov [reg], reg'

[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff8105341e mov qword ptr [rsi], rax ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81000cf5 pop rsi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81029a11 pop rax ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff811f1c3b xor rax, rax ; ret

- Step 2 -- Init syscall number gadgets

$ ROPgadget.py --ropchain --binary vmlinux.zero* | sed -n '/Step 1/,/Step 2/p'
- Step 1 -- Write-what-where gadgets

[-] Can't find the 'mov qword ptr [r64], r64' gadget

For an x86_64 parallel build tests, this has a less than 1% performance
impact, and grows the image size less than 1%:

$ size vmlinux.stock vmlinux.zero-call-regs
text data bss dec hex filename
22437676 8559152 14127340 45124168 2b08a48 vmlinux.stock
22453184 8563248 14110956 45127388 2b096dc vmlinux.zero-call-regs

Impact for other architectures may vary. For example, arm64 sees a 5.5%
image size growth, mainly due to needing to always clear x16 and x17:
https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20210510134503.GA88495@C02TD0UTHF1T.local/

Signed-off-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
diff a82adfd5 Mon Apr 12 20:56:54 MDT 2021 Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org> hardening: Introduce CONFIG_ZERO_CALL_USED_REGS

When CONFIG_ZERO_CALL_USED_REGS is enabled, build the kernel with
"-fzero-call-used-regs=used-gpr" (in GCC 11). This option will zero any
caller-used register contents just before returning from a function,
ensuring that temporary values are not leaked beyond the function
boundary. This means that register contents are less likely to be
available for side channel attacks and information exposures.

Additionally this helps reduce the number of useful ROP gadgets in the
kernel image by about 20%:

$ ROPgadget.py --nosys --nojop --binary vmlinux.stock | tail -n1
Unique gadgets found: 337245

$ ROPgadget.py --nosys --nojop --binary vmlinux.zero-call-regs | tail -n1
Unique gadgets found: 267175

and more notably removes simple "write-what-where" gadgets:

$ ROPgadget.py --ropchain --binary vmlinux.stock | sed -n '/Step 1/,/Step 2/p'
- Step 1 -- Write-what-where gadgets

[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff8102d76c mov qword ptr [rsi], rdx ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81000cf5 pop rsi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff8104d7c8 pop rdx ; ret
[-] Can't find the 'xor rdx, rdx' gadget. Try with another 'mov [reg], reg'

[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff814c2b4c mov qword ptr [rsi], rdi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81000cf5 pop rsi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81001e51 pop rdi ; ret
[-] Can't find the 'xor rdi, rdi' gadget. Try with another 'mov [reg], reg'

[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81540d61 mov qword ptr [rsi], rdi ; pop rbx ; pop rbp ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81000cf5 pop rsi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81001e51 pop rdi ; ret
[-] Can't find the 'xor rdi, rdi' gadget. Try with another 'mov [reg], reg'

[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff8105341e mov qword ptr [rsi], rax ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81000cf5 pop rsi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81029a11 pop rax ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff811f1c3b xor rax, rax ; ret

- Step 2 -- Init syscall number gadgets

$ ROPgadget.py --ropchain --binary vmlinux.zero* | sed -n '/Step 1/,/Step 2/p'
- Step 1 -- Write-what-where gadgets

[-] Can't find the 'mov qword ptr [r64], r64' gadget

For an x86_64 parallel build tests, this has a less than 1% performance
impact, and grows the image size less than 1%:

$ size vmlinux.stock vmlinux.zero-call-regs
text data bss dec hex filename
22437676 8559152 14127340 45124168 2b08a48 vmlinux.stock
22453184 8563248 14110956 45127388 2b096dc vmlinux.zero-call-regs

Impact for other architectures may vary. For example, arm64 sees a 5.5%
image size growth, mainly due to needing to always clear x16 and x17:
https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20210510134503.GA88495@C02TD0UTHF1T.local/

Signed-off-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
diff a82adfd5 Mon Apr 12 20:56:54 MDT 2021 Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org> hardening: Introduce CONFIG_ZERO_CALL_USED_REGS

When CONFIG_ZERO_CALL_USED_REGS is enabled, build the kernel with
"-fzero-call-used-regs=used-gpr" (in GCC 11). This option will zero any
caller-used register contents just before returning from a function,
ensuring that temporary values are not leaked beyond the function
boundary. This means that register contents are less likely to be
available for side channel attacks and information exposures.

Additionally this helps reduce the number of useful ROP gadgets in the
kernel image by about 20%:

$ ROPgadget.py --nosys --nojop --binary vmlinux.stock | tail -n1
Unique gadgets found: 337245

$ ROPgadget.py --nosys --nojop --binary vmlinux.zero-call-regs | tail -n1
Unique gadgets found: 267175

and more notably removes simple "write-what-where" gadgets:

$ ROPgadget.py --ropchain --binary vmlinux.stock | sed -n '/Step 1/,/Step 2/p'
- Step 1 -- Write-what-where gadgets

[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff8102d76c mov qword ptr [rsi], rdx ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81000cf5 pop rsi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff8104d7c8 pop rdx ; ret
[-] Can't find the 'xor rdx, rdx' gadget. Try with another 'mov [reg], reg'

[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff814c2b4c mov qword ptr [rsi], rdi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81000cf5 pop rsi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81001e51 pop rdi ; ret
[-] Can't find the 'xor rdi, rdi' gadget. Try with another 'mov [reg], reg'

[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81540d61 mov qword ptr [rsi], rdi ; pop rbx ; pop rbp ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81000cf5 pop rsi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81001e51 pop rdi ; ret
[-] Can't find the 'xor rdi, rdi' gadget. Try with another 'mov [reg], reg'

[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff8105341e mov qword ptr [rsi], rax ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81000cf5 pop rsi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81029a11 pop rax ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff811f1c3b xor rax, rax ; ret

- Step 2 -- Init syscall number gadgets

$ ROPgadget.py --ropchain --binary vmlinux.zero* | sed -n '/Step 1/,/Step 2/p'
- Step 1 -- Write-what-where gadgets

[-] Can't find the 'mov qword ptr [r64], r64' gadget

For an x86_64 parallel build tests, this has a less than 1% performance
impact, and grows the image size less than 1%:

$ size vmlinux.stock vmlinux.zero-call-regs
text data bss dec hex filename
22437676 8559152 14127340 45124168 2b08a48 vmlinux.stock
22453184 8563248 14110956 45127388 2b096dc vmlinux.zero-call-regs

Impact for other architectures may vary. For example, arm64 sees a 5.5%
image size growth, mainly due to needing to always clear x16 and x17:
https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20210510134503.GA88495@C02TD0UTHF1T.local/

Signed-off-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
diff a82adfd5 Mon Apr 12 20:56:54 MDT 2021 Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org> hardening: Introduce CONFIG_ZERO_CALL_USED_REGS

When CONFIG_ZERO_CALL_USED_REGS is enabled, build the kernel with
"-fzero-call-used-regs=used-gpr" (in GCC 11). This option will zero any
caller-used register contents just before returning from a function,
ensuring that temporary values are not leaked beyond the function
boundary. This means that register contents are less likely to be
available for side channel attacks and information exposures.

Additionally this helps reduce the number of useful ROP gadgets in the
kernel image by about 20%:

$ ROPgadget.py --nosys --nojop --binary vmlinux.stock | tail -n1
Unique gadgets found: 337245

$ ROPgadget.py --nosys --nojop --binary vmlinux.zero-call-regs | tail -n1
Unique gadgets found: 267175

and more notably removes simple "write-what-where" gadgets:

$ ROPgadget.py --ropchain --binary vmlinux.stock | sed -n '/Step 1/,/Step 2/p'
- Step 1 -- Write-what-where gadgets

[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff8102d76c mov qword ptr [rsi], rdx ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81000cf5 pop rsi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff8104d7c8 pop rdx ; ret
[-] Can't find the 'xor rdx, rdx' gadget. Try with another 'mov [reg], reg'

[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff814c2b4c mov qword ptr [rsi], rdi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81000cf5 pop rsi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81001e51 pop rdi ; ret
[-] Can't find the 'xor rdi, rdi' gadget. Try with another 'mov [reg], reg'

[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81540d61 mov qword ptr [rsi], rdi ; pop rbx ; pop rbp ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81000cf5 pop rsi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81001e51 pop rdi ; ret
[-] Can't find the 'xor rdi, rdi' gadget. Try with another 'mov [reg], reg'

[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff8105341e mov qword ptr [rsi], rax ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81000cf5 pop rsi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81029a11 pop rax ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff811f1c3b xor rax, rax ; ret

- Step 2 -- Init syscall number gadgets

$ ROPgadget.py --ropchain --binary vmlinux.zero* | sed -n '/Step 1/,/Step 2/p'
- Step 1 -- Write-what-where gadgets

[-] Can't find the 'mov qword ptr [r64], r64' gadget

For an x86_64 parallel build tests, this has a less than 1% performance
impact, and grows the image size less than 1%:

$ size vmlinux.stock vmlinux.zero-call-regs
text data bss dec hex filename
22437676 8559152 14127340 45124168 2b08a48 vmlinux.stock
22453184 8563248 14110956 45127388 2b096dc vmlinux.zero-call-regs

Impact for other architectures may vary. For example, arm64 sees a 5.5%
image size growth, mainly due to needing to always clear x16 and x17:
https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20210510134503.GA88495@C02TD0UTHF1T.local/

Signed-off-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
diff a82adfd5 Mon Apr 12 20:56:54 MDT 2021 Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org> hardening: Introduce CONFIG_ZERO_CALL_USED_REGS

When CONFIG_ZERO_CALL_USED_REGS is enabled, build the kernel with
"-fzero-call-used-regs=used-gpr" (in GCC 11). This option will zero any
caller-used register contents just before returning from a function,
ensuring that temporary values are not leaked beyond the function
boundary. This means that register contents are less likely to be
available for side channel attacks and information exposures.

Additionally this helps reduce the number of useful ROP gadgets in the
kernel image by about 20%:

$ ROPgadget.py --nosys --nojop --binary vmlinux.stock | tail -n1
Unique gadgets found: 337245

$ ROPgadget.py --nosys --nojop --binary vmlinux.zero-call-regs | tail -n1
Unique gadgets found: 267175

and more notably removes simple "write-what-where" gadgets:

$ ROPgadget.py --ropchain --binary vmlinux.stock | sed -n '/Step 1/,/Step 2/p'
- Step 1 -- Write-what-where gadgets

[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff8102d76c mov qword ptr [rsi], rdx ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81000cf5 pop rsi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff8104d7c8 pop rdx ; ret
[-] Can't find the 'xor rdx, rdx' gadget. Try with another 'mov [reg], reg'

[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff814c2b4c mov qword ptr [rsi], rdi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81000cf5 pop rsi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81001e51 pop rdi ; ret
[-] Can't find the 'xor rdi, rdi' gadget. Try with another 'mov [reg], reg'

[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81540d61 mov qword ptr [rsi], rdi ; pop rbx ; pop rbp ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81000cf5 pop rsi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81001e51 pop rdi ; ret
[-] Can't find the 'xor rdi, rdi' gadget. Try with another 'mov [reg], reg'

[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff8105341e mov qword ptr [rsi], rax ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81000cf5 pop rsi ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff81029a11 pop rax ; ret
[+] Gadget found: 0xffffffff811f1c3b xor rax, rax ; ret

- Step 2 -- Init syscall number gadgets

$ ROPgadget.py --ropchain --binary vmlinux.zero* | sed -n '/Step 1/,/Step 2/p'
- Step 1 -- Write-what-where gadgets

[-] Can't find the 'mov qword ptr [r64], r64' gadget

For an x86_64 parallel build tests, this has a less than 1% performance
impact, and grows the image size less than 1%:

$ size vmlinux.stock vmlinux.zero-call-regs
text data bss dec hex filename
22437676 8559152 14127340 45124168 2b08a48 vmlinux.stock
22453184 8563248 14110956 45127388 2b096dc vmlinux.zero-call-regs

Impact for other architectures may vary. For example, arm64 sees a 5.5%
image size growth, mainly due to needing to always clear x16 and x17:
https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20210510134503.GA88495@C02TD0UTHF1T.local/

Signed-off-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>

Completed in 232 milliseconds