History log of /linux-master/mm/
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77e02cf5 14-Sep-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

memblock: introduce saner 'memblock_free_ptr()' interface

The boot-time allocation interface for memblock is a mess, with
'memblock_alloc()' returning a virtual pointer, but then you are
supposed to free it with 'memblock_free()' that takes a _physical_
address.

Not only is that all kinds of strange and illogical, but it actually
causes bugs, when people then use it like a normal allocation function,
and it fails spectacularly on a NULL pointer:

https://lore.kernel.org/all/20210912140820.GD25450@xsang-OptiPlex-9020/

or just random memory corruption if the debug checks don't catch it:

https://lore.kernel.org/all/61ab2d0c-3313-aaab-514c-e15b7aa054a0@suse.cz/

I really don't want to apply patches that treat the symptoms, when the
fundamental cause is this horribly confusing interface.

I started out looking at just automating a sane replacement sequence,
but because of this mix or virtual and physical addresses, and because
people have used the "__pa()" macro that can take either a regular
kernel pointer, or just the raw "unsigned long" address, it's all quite
messy.

So this just introduces a new saner interface for freeing a virtual
address that was allocated using 'memblock_alloc()', and that was kept
as a regular kernel pointer. And then it converts a couple of users
that are obvious and easy to test, including the 'xbc_nodes' case in
lib/bootconfig.c that caused problems.

Reported-by: kernel test robot <oliver.sang@intel.com>
Fixes: 40caa127f3c7 ("init: bootconfig: Remove all bootconfig data when the init memory is removed")
Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>
Cc: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Cc: Masami Hiramatsu <mhiramat@kernel.org>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

31634624 13-Sep-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge branch 'gcc-min-version-5.1' (make gcc-5.1 the minimum version)

Merge patch series from Nick Desaulniers to update the minimum gcc
version to 5.1.

This is some of the left-overs from the merge window that I didn't want
to deal with yesterday, so it comes in after -rc1 but was sent before.

Gcc-4.9 support has been an annoyance for some time, and with -Werror I
had the choice of applying a fairly big patch from Kees Cook to remove a
fair number of initializer warnings (still leaving some), or this patch
series from Nick that just removes the source of the problem.

The initializer cleanups might still be worth it regardless, but
honestly, I preferred just tackling the problem with gcc-4.9 head-on.
We've been more aggressiuve about no longer having to care about
compilers that were released a long time ago, and I think it's been a
good thing.

I added a couple of patches on top to sort out a few left-overs now that
we no longer support gcc-4.x.

As noted by Arnd, as a result of this minimum compiler version upgrade
we can probably change our use of '--std=gnu89' to '--std=gnu11', and
finally start using local loop declarations etc. But this series does
_not_ yet do that.

Link: https://lore.kernel.org/all/20210909182525.372ee687@canb.auug.org.au/
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/CAK7LNASs6dvU6D3jL2GG3jW58fXfaj6VNOe55NJnTB8UPuk2pA@mail.gmail.com/
Link: https://github.com/ClangBuiltLinux/linux/issues/1438

* emailed patches from Nick Desaulniers <ndesaulniers@google.com>:
Drop some straggling mentions of gcc-4.9 as being stale
compiler_attributes.h: drop __has_attribute() support for gcc4
vmlinux.lds.h: remove old check for GCC 4.9
compiler-gcc.h: drop checks for older GCC versions
Makefile: drop GCC < 5 -fno-var-tracking-assignments workaround
arm64: remove GCC version check for ARCH_SUPPORTS_INT128
powerpc: remove GCC version check for UPD_CONSTR
riscv: remove Kconfig check for GCC version for ARCH_RV64I
Kconfig.debug: drop GCC 5+ version check for DWARF5
mm/ksm: remove old GCC 4.9+ check
compiler.h: drop fallback overflow checkers
Documentation: raise minimum supported version of GCC to 5.1


adac17e3 10-Sep-2021 Nick Desaulniers <ndesaulniers@google.com>

mm/ksm: remove old GCC 4.9+ check

The minimum supported version of GCC has been raised to GCC 5.1.

Signed-off-by: Nick Desaulniers <ndesaulniers@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Reviewed-by: Nathan Chancellor <nathan@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

35776f10 09-Sep-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge tag 'for-linus' of git://git.armlinux.org.uk/~rmk/linux-arm

Pull ARM development updates from Russell King:

- Rename "mod_init" and "mod_exit" so that initcall debug output is
actually useful (Randy Dunlap)

- Update maintainers entries for linux-arm-kernel to indicate it is
moderated for non-subscribers (Randy Dunlap)

- Move install rules to arch/arm/Makefile (Masahiro Yamada)

- Drop unnecessary ARCH_NR_GPIOS definition (Linus Walleij)

- Don't warn about atags_to_fdt() stack size (David Heidelberg)

- Speed up unaligned copy_{from,to}_kernel_nofault (Arnd Bergmann)

- Get rid of set_fs() usage (Arnd Bergmann)

- Remove checks for GCC prior to v4.6 (Geert Uytterhoeven)

* tag 'for-linus' of git://git.armlinux.org.uk/~rmk/linux-arm:
ARM: 9118/1: div64: Remove always-true __div64_const32_is_OK() duplicate
ARM: 9117/1: asm-generic: div64: Remove always-true __div64_const32_is_OK()
ARM: 9116/1: unified: Remove check for gcc < 4
ARM: 9110/1: oabi-compat: fix oabi epoll sparse warning
ARM: 9113/1: uaccess: remove set_fs() implementation
ARM: 9112/1: uaccess: add __{get,put}_kernel_nofault
ARM: 9111/1: oabi-compat: rework fcntl64() emulation
ARM: 9114/1: oabi-compat: rework sys_semtimedop emulation
ARM: 9108/1: oabi-compat: rework epoll_wait/epoll_pwait emulation
ARM: 9107/1: syscall: always store thread_info->abi_syscall
ARM: 9109/1: oabi-compat: add epoll_pwait handler
ARM: 9106/1: traps: use get_kernel_nofault instead of set_fs()
ARM: 9115/1: mm/maccess: fix unaligned copy_{from,to}_kernel_nofault
ARM: 9105/1: atags_to_fdt: don't warn about stack size
ARM: 9103/1: Drop ARCH_NR_GPIOS definition
ARM: 9102/1: move theinstall rules to arch/arm/Makefile
ARM: 9100/1: MAINTAINERS: mark all linux-arm-kernel@infradead list as moderated
ARM: 9099/1: crypto: rename 'mod_init' & 'mod_exit' functions to be module-specific


a3fa7a10 08-Sep-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge branches 'akpm' and 'akpm-hotfixes' (patches from Andrew)

Merge yet more updates and hotfixes from Andrew Morton:
"Post-linux-next material, based upon latest upstream to catch the
now-merged dependencies:

- 10 patches.

Subsystems affected by this patch series: mm (vmstat and migration)
and compat.

And bunch of hotfixes, mostly cc:stable:

- 8 patches.

Subsystems affected by this patch series: mm (hmm, hugetlb, vmscan,
pagealloc, pagemap, kmemleak, mempolicy, and memblock)"

* emailed patches from Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>:
arch: remove compat_alloc_user_space
compat: remove some compat entry points
mm: simplify compat numa syscalls
mm: simplify compat_sys_move_pages
kexec: avoid compat_alloc_user_space
kexec: move locking into do_kexec_load
mm: migrate: change to use bool type for 'page_was_mapped'
mm: migrate: fix the incorrect function name in comments
mm: migrate: introduce a local variable to get the number of pages
mm/vmstat: protect per cpu variables with preempt disable on RT

* emailed hotfixes from Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>:
nds32/setup: remove unused memblock_region variable in setup_memory()
mm/mempolicy: fix a race between offset_il_node and mpol_rebind_task
mm/kmemleak: allow __GFP_NOLOCKDEP passed to kmemleak's gfp
mmap_lock: change trace and locking order
mm/page_alloc.c: avoid accessing uninitialized pcp page migratetype
mm,vmscan: fix divide by zero in get_scan_count
mm/hugetlb: initialize hugetlb_usage in mm_init
mm/hmm: bypass devmap pte when all pfn requested flags are fulfilled


276aeee1 08-Sep-2021 yanghui <yanghui.def@bytedance.com>

mm/mempolicy: fix a race between offset_il_node and mpol_rebind_task

Servers happened below panic:

Kernel version:5.4.56
BUG: unable to handle page fault for address: 0000000000002c48
RIP: 0010:__next_zones_zonelist+0x1d/0x40
Call Trace:
__alloc_pages_nodemask+0x277/0x310
alloc_page_interleave+0x13/0x70
handle_mm_fault+0xf99/0x1390
__do_page_fault+0x288/0x500
do_page_fault+0x30/0x110
page_fault+0x3e/0x50

The reason for the panic is that MAX_NUMNODES is passed in the third
parameter in __alloc_pages_nodemask(preferred_nid). So access to
zonelist->zoneref->zone_idx in __next_zones_zonelist will cause a panic.

In offset_il_node(), first_node() returns nid from pol->v.nodes, after
this other threads may chang pol->v.nodes before next_node(). This race
condition will let next_node return MAX_NUMNODES. So put pol->nodes in
a local variable.

The race condition is between offset_il_node and cpuset_change_task_nodemask:

CPU0: CPU1:
alloc_pages_vma()
interleave_nid(pol,)
offset_il_node(pol,)
first_node(pol->v.nodes) cpuset_change_task_nodemask
//nodes==0xc mpol_rebind_task
mpol_rebind_policy
mpol_rebind_nodemask(pol,nodes)
//nodes==0x3
next_node(nid, pol->v.nodes)//return MAX_NUMNODES

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210906034658.48721-1-yanghui.def@bytedance.com
Signed-off-by: yanghui <yanghui.def@bytedance.com>
Reviewed-by: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

79d37050 08-Sep-2021 Naohiro Aota <naohiro.aota@wdc.com>

mm/kmemleak: allow __GFP_NOLOCKDEP passed to kmemleak's gfp

In a memory pressure situation, I'm seeing the lockdep WARNING below.
Actually, this is similar to a known false positive which is already
addressed by commit 6dcde60efd94 ("xfs: more lockdep whackamole with
kmem_alloc*").

This warning still persists because it's not from kmalloc() itself but
from an allocation for kmemleak object. While kmalloc() itself suppress
the warning with __GFP_NOLOCKDEP, gfp_kmemleak_mask() is dropping the
flag for the kmemleak's allocation.

Allow __GFP_NOLOCKDEP to be passed to kmemleak's allocation, so that the
warning for it is also suppressed.

======================================================
WARNING: possible circular locking dependency detected
5.14.0-rc7-BTRFS-ZNS+ #37 Not tainted
------------------------------------------------------
kswapd0/288 is trying to acquire lock:
ffff88825ab45df0 (&xfs_nondir_ilock_class){++++}-{3:3}, at: xfs_ilock+0x8a/0x250

but task is already holding lock:
ffffffff848cc1e0 (fs_reclaim){+.+.}-{0:0}, at: __fs_reclaim_acquire+0x5/0x30

which lock already depends on the new lock.

the existing dependency chain (in reverse order) is:

-> #1 (fs_reclaim){+.+.}-{0:0}:
fs_reclaim_acquire+0x112/0x160
kmem_cache_alloc+0x48/0x400
create_object.isra.0+0x42/0xb10
kmemleak_alloc+0x48/0x80
__kmalloc+0x228/0x440
kmem_alloc+0xd3/0x2b0
kmem_alloc_large+0x5a/0x1c0
xfs_attr_copy_value+0x112/0x190
xfs_attr_shortform_getvalue+0x1fc/0x300
xfs_attr_get_ilocked+0x125/0x170
xfs_attr_get+0x329/0x450
xfs_get_acl+0x18d/0x430
get_acl.part.0+0xb6/0x1e0
posix_acl_xattr_get+0x13a/0x230
vfs_getxattr+0x21d/0x270
getxattr+0x126/0x310
__x64_sys_fgetxattr+0x1a6/0x2a0
do_syscall_64+0x3b/0x90
entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xae

-> #0 (&xfs_nondir_ilock_class){++++}-{3:3}:
__lock_acquire+0x2c0f/0x5a00
lock_acquire+0x1a1/0x4b0
down_read_nested+0x50/0x90
xfs_ilock+0x8a/0x250
xfs_can_free_eofblocks+0x34f/0x570
xfs_inactive+0x411/0x520
xfs_fs_destroy_inode+0x2c8/0x710
destroy_inode+0xc5/0x1a0
evict+0x444/0x620
dispose_list+0xfe/0x1c0
prune_icache_sb+0xdc/0x160
super_cache_scan+0x31e/0x510
do_shrink_slab+0x337/0x8e0
shrink_slab+0x362/0x5c0
shrink_node+0x7a7/0x1a40
balance_pgdat+0x64e/0xfe0
kswapd+0x590/0xa80
kthread+0x38c/0x460
ret_from_fork+0x22/0x30

other info that might help us debug this:
Possible unsafe locking scenario:
CPU0 CPU1
---- ----
lock(fs_reclaim);
lock(&xfs_nondir_ilock_class);
lock(fs_reclaim);
lock(&xfs_nondir_ilock_class);

*** DEADLOCK ***
3 locks held by kswapd0/288:
#0: ffffffff848cc1e0 (fs_reclaim){+.+.}-{0:0}, at: __fs_reclaim_acquire+0x5/0x30
#1: ffffffff848a08d8 (shrinker_rwsem){++++}-{3:3}, at: shrink_slab+0x269/0x5c0
#2: ffff8881a7a820e8 (&type->s_umount_key#60){++++}-{3:3}, at: super_cache_scan+0x5a/0x510

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210907055659.3182992-1-naohiro.aota@wdc.com
Signed-off-by: Naohiro Aota <naohiro.aota@wdc.com>
Acked-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: "Darrick J . Wong" <djwong@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

053cfda1 08-Sep-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/page_alloc.c: avoid accessing uninitialized pcp page migratetype

If it's not prepared to free unref page, the pcp page migratetype is
unset. Thus we will get rubbish from get_pcppage_migratetype() and
might list_del(&page->lru) again after it's already deleted from the list
leading to grumble about data corruption.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210902115447.57050-1-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Fixes: df1acc856923 ("mm/page_alloc: avoid conflating IRQs disabled with zone->lock")
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

32d4f4b7 08-Sep-2021 Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>

mm,vmscan: fix divide by zero in get_scan_count

Commit f56ce412a59d ("mm: memcontrol: fix occasional OOMs due to
proportional memory.low reclaim") introduced a divide by zero corner
case when oomd is being used in combination with cgroup memory.low
protection.

When oomd decides to kill a cgroup, it will force the cgroup memory to
be reclaimed after killing the tasks, by writing to the memory.max file
for that cgroup, forcing the remaining page cache and reclaimable slab
to be reclaimed down to zero.

Previously, on cgroups with some memory.low protection that would result
in the memory being reclaimed down to the memory.low limit, or likely
not at all, having the page cache reclaimed asynchronously later.

With f56ce412a59d the oomd write to memory.max tries to reclaim all the
way down to zero, which may race with another reclaimer, to the point of
ending up with the divide by zero below.

This patch implements the obvious fix.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210826220149.058089c6@imladris.surriel.com
Fixes: f56ce412a59d ("mm: memcontrol: fix occasional OOMs due to proportional memory.low reclaim")
Signed-off-by: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Acked-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Acked-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Acked-by: Chris Down <chris@chrisdown.name>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

4b42fb21 08-Sep-2021 Li Zhijian <lizhijian@cn.fujitsu.com>

mm/hmm: bypass devmap pte when all pfn requested flags are fulfilled

Previously, we noticed the one rpma example was failed[1] since commit
36f30e486dce ("IB/core: Improve ODP to use hmm_range_fault()"), where it
will use ODP feature to do RDMA WRITE between fsdax files.

After digging into the code, we found hmm_vma_handle_pte() will still
return EFAULT even though all the its requesting flags has been
fulfilled. That's because a DAX page will be marked as (_PAGE_SPECIAL |
PAGE_DEVMAP) by pte_mkdevmap().

Link: https://github.com/pmem/rpma/issues/1142 [1]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210830094232.203029-1-lizhijian@cn.fujitsu.com
Fixes: 405506274922 ("mm/hmm: add missing call to hmm_pte_need_fault in HMM_PFN_SPECIAL handling")
Signed-off-by: Li Zhijian <lizhijian@cn.fujitsu.com>
Reviewed-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Reviewed-by: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@nvidia.com>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

59ab844e 08-Sep-2021 Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>

compat: remove some compat entry points

These are all handled correctly when calling the native system call entry
point, so remove the special cases.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210727144859.4150043-6-arnd@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Reviewed-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Christian Borntraeger <borntraeger@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org>
Cc: "David S. Miller" <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Eric Biederman <ebiederm@xmission.com>
Cc: Feng Tang <feng.tang@intel.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <hca@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de>
Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: "James E.J. Bottomley" <James.Bottomley@HansenPartnership.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Thomas Bogendoerfer <tsbogend@alpha.franken.de>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Vasily Gorbik <gor@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

e130242d 08-Sep-2021 Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>

mm: simplify compat numa syscalls

The compat implementations for mbind, get_mempolicy, set_mempolicy and
migrate_pages are just there to handle the subtly different layout of
bitmaps on 32-bit hosts.

The compat implementation however lacks some of the checks that are
present in the native one, in particular for checking that the extra bits
are all zero when user space has a larger mask size than the kernel.
Worse, those extra bits do not get cleared when copying in or out of the
kernel, which can lead to incorrect data as well.

Unify the implementation to handle the compat bitmap layout directly in
the get_nodes() and copy_nodes_to_user() helpers. Splitting out the
get_bitmap() helper from get_nodes() also helps readability of the native
case.

On x86, two additional problems are addressed by this: compat tasks can
pass a bitmap at the end of a mapping, causing a fault when reading across
the page boundary for a 64-bit word. x32 tasks might also run into
problems with get_mempolicy corrupting data when an odd number of 32-bit
words gets passed.

On parisc the migrate_pages() system call apparently had the wrong calling
convention, as big-endian architectures expect the words inside of a
bitmap to be swapped. This is not a problem though since parisc has no
NUMA support.

[arnd@arndb.de: fix mempolicy crash]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210730143417.3700653-1-arnd@kernel.org
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/YQPLG20V3dmOfq3a@osiris/

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210727144859.4150043-5-arnd@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Reviewed-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Christian Borntraeger <borntraeger@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org>
Cc: "David S. Miller" <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Eric Biederman <ebiederm@xmission.com>
Cc: Feng Tang <feng.tang@intel.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <hca@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de>
Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: "James E.J. Bottomley" <James.Bottomley@HansenPartnership.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Thomas Bogendoerfer <tsbogend@alpha.franken.de>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Vasily Gorbik <gor@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

5b1b561b 08-Sep-2021 Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>

mm: simplify compat_sys_move_pages

The compat move_pages() implementation uses compat_alloc_user_space() for
converting the pointer array. Moving the compat handling into the
function itself is a bit simpler and lets us avoid the
compat_alloc_user_space() call.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210727144859.4150043-4-arnd@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Reviewed-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: Al Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Christian Borntraeger <borntraeger@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org>
Cc: "David S. Miller" <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Eric Biederman <ebiederm@xmission.com>
Cc: Feng Tang <feng.tang@intel.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <hca@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de>
Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: "James E.J. Bottomley" <James.Bottomley@HansenPartnership.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Thomas Bogendoerfer <tsbogend@alpha.franken.de>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Vasily Gorbik <gor@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

213ecb31 08-Sep-2021 Baolin Wang <baolin.wang@linux.alibaba.com>

mm: migrate: change to use bool type for 'page_was_mapped'

Change to use bool type for 'page_was_mapped' variable making it more
readable.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/ce1279df18d2c163998c403e0b5ec6d3f6f90f7a.1629447552.git.baolin.wang@linux.alibaba.com
Signed-off-by: Baolin Wang <baolin.wang@linux.alibaba.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Cc: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

68a9843f 08-Sep-2021 Baolin Wang <baolin.wang@linux.alibaba.com>

mm: migrate: fix the incorrect function name in comments

since commit a98a2f0c8ce1 ("mm/rmap: split migration into its own
function"), the migration ptes establishment has been split into a
separate try_to_migrate() function, thus update the related comments.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/5b824bad6183259c916ae6cf42f81d14c6118b06.1629447552.git.baolin.wang@linux.alibaba.com
Signed-off-by: Baolin Wang <baolin.wang@linux.alibaba.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

2b9b624f 08-Sep-2021 Baolin Wang <baolin.wang@linux.alibaba.com>

mm: migrate: introduce a local variable to get the number of pages

Use thp_nr_pages() instead of compound_nr() to get the number of pages for
THP page, meanwhile introducing a local variable 'nr_pages' to avoid
getting the number of pages repeatedly.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/a8e331ac04392ee230c79186330fb05e86a2aa77.1629447552.git.baolin.wang@linux.alibaba.com
Signed-off-by: Baolin Wang <baolin.wang@linux.alibaba.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Cc: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

c68ed794 08-Sep-2021 Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>

mm/vmstat: protect per cpu variables with preempt disable on RT

Disable preemption on -RT for the vmstat code. On vanila the code runs in
IRQ-off regions while on -RT it may not when stats are updated under a
local_lock. "preempt_disable" ensures that the same resources is not
updated in parallel due to preemption.

This patch differs from the preempt-rt version where __count_vm_event and
__count_vm_events are also protected. The counters are explicitly
"allowed to be to be racy" so there is no need to protect them from
preemption. Only the accurate page stats that are updated by a
read-modify-write need protection. This patch also differs in that a
preempt_[en|dis]able_rt helper is not used. As vmstat is the only user of
the helper, it was suggested that it be open-coded in vmstat.c instead of
risking the helper being used in unnecessary contexts.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210805160019.1137-2-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
Signed-off-by: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

2d338201 08-Sep-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge branch 'akpm' (patches from Andrew)

Merge more updates from Andrew Morton:
"147 patches, based on 7d2a07b769330c34b4deabeed939325c77a7ec2f.

Subsystems affected by this patch series: mm (memory-hotplug, rmap,
ioremap, highmem, cleanups, secretmem, kfence, damon, and vmscan),
alpha, percpu, procfs, misc, core-kernel, MAINTAINERS, lib,
checkpatch, epoll, init, nilfs2, coredump, fork, pids, criu, kconfig,
selftests, ipc, and scripts"

* emailed patches from Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>: (94 commits)
scripts: check_extable: fix typo in user error message
mm/workingset: correct kernel-doc notations
ipc: replace costly bailout check in sysvipc_find_ipc()
selftests/memfd: remove unused variable
Kconfig.debug: drop selecting non-existing HARDLOCKUP_DETECTOR_ARCH
configs: remove the obsolete CONFIG_INPUT_POLLDEV
prctl: allow to setup brk for et_dyn executables
pid: cleanup the stale comment mentioning pidmap_init().
kernel/fork.c: unexport get_{mm,task}_exe_file
coredump: fix memleak in dump_vma_snapshot()
fs/coredump.c: log if a core dump is aborted due to changed file permissions
nilfs2: use refcount_dec_and_lock() to fix potential UAF
nilfs2: fix memory leak in nilfs_sysfs_delete_snapshot_group
nilfs2: fix memory leak in nilfs_sysfs_create_snapshot_group
nilfs2: fix memory leak in nilfs_sysfs_delete_##name##_group
nilfs2: fix memory leak in nilfs_sysfs_create_##name##_group
nilfs2: fix NULL pointer in nilfs_##name##_attr_release
nilfs2: fix memory leak in nilfs_sysfs_create_device_group
trap: cleanup trap_init()
init: move usermodehelper_enable() to populate_rootfs()
...


cc09ee80 08-Sep-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge tag 'mm-slub-5.15-rc1' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/vbabka/linux

Pull SLUB updates from Vlastimil Babka:
"SLUB: reduce irq disabled scope and make it RT compatible

This series was initially inspired by Mel's pcplist local_lock
rewrite, and also interest to better understand SLUB's locking and the
new primitives and RT variants and implications. It makes SLUB
compatible with PREEMPT_RT and generally more preemption-friendly,
apparently without significant regressions, as the fast paths are not
affected.

The main changes to SLUB by this series:

- irq disabling is now only done for minimum amount of time needed to
protect the strict kmem_cache_cpu fields, and as part of spin lock,
local lock and bit lock operations to make them irq-safe

- SLUB is fully PREEMPT_RT compatible

The series should now be sufficiently tested in both RT and !RT
configs, mainly thanks to Mike.

The RFC/v1 version also got basic performance screening by Mel that
didn't show major regressions. Mike's testing with hackbench of v2 on
!RT reported negligible differences [6]:

virgin(ish) tip
5.13.0.g60ab3ed-tip
7,320.67 msec task-clock # 7.792 CPUs utilized ( +- 0.31% )
221,215 context-switches # 0.030 M/sec ( +- 3.97% )
16,234 cpu-migrations # 0.002 M/sec ( +- 4.07% )
13,233 page-faults # 0.002 M/sec ( +- 0.91% )
27,592,205,252 cycles # 3.769 GHz ( +- 0.32% )
8,309,495,040 instructions # 0.30 insn per cycle ( +- 0.37% )
1,555,210,607 branches # 212.441 M/sec ( +- 0.42% )
5,484,209 branch-misses # 0.35% of all branches ( +- 2.13% )

0.93949 +- 0.00423 seconds time elapsed ( +- 0.45% )
0.94608 +- 0.00384 seconds time elapsed ( +- 0.41% ) (repeat)
0.94422 +- 0.00410 seconds time elapsed ( +- 0.43% )

5.13.0.g60ab3ed-tip +slub-local-lock-v2r3
7,343.57 msec task-clock # 7.776 CPUs utilized ( +- 0.44% )
223,044 context-switches # 0.030 M/sec ( +- 3.02% )
16,057 cpu-migrations # 0.002 M/sec ( +- 4.03% )
13,164 page-faults # 0.002 M/sec ( +- 0.97% )
27,684,906,017 cycles # 3.770 GHz ( +- 0.45% )
8,323,273,871 instructions # 0.30 insn per cycle ( +- 0.28% )
1,556,106,680 branches # 211.901 M/sec ( +- 0.31% )
5,463,468 branch-misses # 0.35% of all branches ( +- 1.33% )

0.94440 +- 0.00352 seconds time elapsed ( +- 0.37% )
0.94830 +- 0.00228 seconds time elapsed ( +- 0.24% ) (repeat)
0.93813 +- 0.00440 seconds time elapsed ( +- 0.47% ) (repeat)

RT configs showed some throughput regressions, but that's expected
tradeoff for the preemption improvements through the RT mutex. It
didn't prevent the v2 to be incorporated to the 5.13 RT tree [7],
leading to testing exposure and bugfixes.

Before the series, SLUB is lockless in both allocation and free fast
paths, but elsewhere, it's disabling irqs for considerable periods of
time - especially in allocation slowpath and the bulk allocation,
where IRQs are re-enabled only when a new page from the page allocator
is needed, and the context allows blocking. The irq disabled sections
can then include deactivate_slab() which walks a full freelist and
frees the slab back to page allocator or unfreeze_partials() going
through a list of percpu partial slabs. The RT tree currently has some
patches mitigating these, but we can do much better in mainline too.

Patches 1-6 are straightforward improvements or cleanups that could
exist outside of this series too, but are prerequsities.

Patches 7-9 are also preparatory code changes without functional
changes, but not so useful without the rest of the series.

Patch 10 simplifies the fast paths on systems with preemption, based
on (hopefully correct) observation that the current loops to verify
tid are unnecessary.

Patches 11-20 focus on reducing irq disabled scope in the allocation
slowpath:

- patch 11 moves disabling of irqs into ___slab_alloc() from its
callers, which are the allocation slowpath, and bulk allocation.
Instead these callers only disable preemption to stabilize the cpu.

- The following patches then gradually reduce the scope of disabled
irqs in ___slab_alloc() and the functions called from there. As of
patch 14, the re-enabling of irqs based on gfp flags before calling
the page allocator is removed from allocate_slab(). As of patch 17,
it's possible to reach the page allocator (in case of existing
slabs depleted) without disabling and re-enabling irqs a single
time.

Pathces 21-26 reduce the scope of disabled irqs in functions related
to unfreezing percpu partial slab.

Patch 27 is preparatory. Patch 28 is adopted from the RT tree and
converts the flushing of percpu slabs on all cpus from using IPI to
workqueue, so that the processing isn't happening with irqs disabled
in the IPI handler. The flushing is not performance critical so it
should be acceptable.

Patch 29 also comes from RT tree and makes object_map_lock RT
compatible.

Patch 30 make slab_lock irq-safe on RT where we cannot rely on having
irq disabled from the list_lock spin lock usage.

Patch 31 changes kmem_cache_cpu->partial handling in put_cpu_partial()
from cmpxchg loop to a short irq disabled section, which is used by
all other code modifying the field. This addresses a theoretical race
scenario pointed out by Jann, and makes the critical section safe wrt
with RT local_lock semantics after the conversion in patch 35.

Patch 32 changes preempt disable to migrate disable, so that the
nested list_lock spinlock is safe to take on RT. Because
migrate_disable() is a function call even on !RT, a small set of
private wrappers is introduced to keep using the cheaper
preempt_disable() on !PREEMPT_RT configurations. As of this patch,
SLUB should be already compatible with RT's lock semantics.

Finally, patch 33 changes irq disabled sections that protect
kmem_cache_cpu fields in the slow paths, with a local lock. However on
PREEMPT_RT it means the lockless fast paths can now preempt slow paths
which don't expect that, so the local lock has to be taken also in the
fast paths and they are no longer lockless. RT folks seem to not mind
this tradeoff. The patch also updates the locking documentation in the
file's comment"

Mike Galbraith and Mel Gorman verified that their earlier testing
observations still hold for the final series:

Link: https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/89ba4f783114520c167cc915ba949ad2c04d6790.camel@gmx.de/
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20210907082010.GB3959@techsingularity.net/

* tag 'mm-slub-5.15-rc1' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/vbabka/linux: (33 commits)
mm, slub: convert kmem_cpu_slab protection to local_lock
mm, slub: use migrate_disable() on PREEMPT_RT
mm, slub: protect put_cpu_partial() with disabled irqs instead of cmpxchg
mm, slub: make slab_lock() disable irqs with PREEMPT_RT
mm: slub: make object_map_lock a raw_spinlock_t
mm: slub: move flush_cpu_slab() invocations __free_slab() invocations out of IRQ context
mm, slab: split out the cpu offline variant of flush_slab()
mm, slub: don't disable irqs in slub_cpu_dead()
mm, slub: only disable irq with spin_lock in __unfreeze_partials()
mm, slub: separate detaching of partial list in unfreeze_partials() from unfreezing
mm, slub: detach whole partial list at once in unfreeze_partials()
mm, slub: discard slabs in unfreeze_partials() without irqs disabled
mm, slub: move irq control into unfreeze_partials()
mm, slub: call deactivate_slab() without disabling irqs
mm, slub: make locking in deactivate_slab() irq-safe
mm, slub: move reset of c->page and freelist out of deactivate_slab()
mm, slub: stop disabling irqs around get_partial()
mm, slub: check new pages with restored irqs
mm, slub: validate slab from partial list or page allocator before making it cpu slab
mm, slub: restore irqs around calling new_slab()
...


560a8705 07-Sep-2021 Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>

mm/workingset: correct kernel-doc notations

Use the documented kernel-doc format to prevent kernel-doc warnings.

mm/workingset.c:256: warning: No description found for return value of 'workingset_eviction'
mm/workingset.c:285: warning: Function parameter or member 'folio' not described in 'workingset_refault'
mm/workingset.c:285: warning: Excess function parameter 'page' description in 'workingset_refault'

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210808203153.10678-1-rdunlap@infradead.org
Signed-off-by: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

3843c50a 07-Sep-2021 Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>

percpu: remove export of pcpu_base_addr

This is not needed by any modules, so remove the export.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210722185814.504541-1-gregkh@linuxfoundation.org
Signed-off-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Reviewed-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: Dennis Zhou <dennis@kernel.org>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

17ccae8b 07-Sep-2021 SeongJae Park <sjpark@amazon.de>

mm/damon: add kunit tests

This commit adds kunit based unit tests for the core and the virtual
address spaces monitoring primitives of DAMON.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210716081449.22187-12-sj38.park@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: SeongJae Park <sjpark@amazon.de>
Reviewed-by: Brendan Higgins <brendanhiggins@google.com>
Cc: Alexander Shishkin <alexander.shishkin@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Amit Shah <amit@kernel.org>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: David Woodhouse <dwmw@amazon.com>
Cc: Fan Du <fan.du@intel.com>
Cc: Fernand Sieber <sieberf@amazon.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <greg@kroah.com>
Cc: Greg Thelen <gthelen@google.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: Jonathan Cameron <Jonathan.Cameron@huawei.com>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Leonard Foerster <foersleo@amazon.de>
Cc: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Cc: Markus Boehme <markubo@amazon.de>
Cc: Maximilian Heyne <mheyne@amazon.de>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Namhyung Kim <namhyung@kernel.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Steven Rostedt (VMware) <rostedt@goodmis.org>
Cc: Vladimir Davydov <vdavydov.dev@gmail.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

75c1c2b5 07-Sep-2021 SeongJae Park <sjpark@amazon.de>

mm/damon/dbgfs: support multiple contexts

In some use cases, users would want to run multiple monitoring context.
For example, if a user wants a high precision monitoring and dedicating
multiple CPUs for the job is ok, because DAMON creates one monitoring
thread per one context, the user can split the monitoring target regions
into multiple small regions and create one context for each region. Or,
someone might want to simultaneously monitor different address spaces,
e.g., both virtual address space and physical address space.

The DAMON's API allows such usage, but 'damon-dbgfs' does not. Therefore,
only kernel space DAMON users can do multiple contexts monitoring.

This commit allows the user space DAMON users to use multiple contexts
monitoring by introducing two new 'damon-dbgfs' debugfs files,
'mk_context' and 'rm_context'. Users can create a new monitoring context
by writing the desired name of the new context to 'mk_context'. Then, a
new directory with the name and having the files for setting of the
context ('attrs', 'target_ids' and 'record') will be created under the
debugfs directory. Writing the name of the context to remove to
'rm_context' will remove the related context and directory.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210716081449.22187-10-sj38.park@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: SeongJae Park <sjpark@amazon.de>
Reviewed-by: Fernand Sieber <sieberf@amazon.com>
Cc: Alexander Shishkin <alexander.shishkin@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Amit Shah <amit@kernel.org>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Brendan Higgins <brendanhiggins@google.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: David Woodhouse <dwmw@amazon.com>
Cc: Fan Du <fan.du@intel.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <greg@kroah.com>
Cc: Greg Thelen <gthelen@google.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: Jonathan Cameron <Jonathan.Cameron@huawei.com>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Leonard Foerster <foersleo@amazon.de>
Cc: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Cc: Markus Boehme <markubo@amazon.de>
Cc: Maximilian Heyne <mheyne@amazon.de>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Namhyung Kim <namhyung@kernel.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Steven Rostedt (VMware) <rostedt@goodmis.org>
Cc: Vladimir Davydov <vdavydov.dev@gmail.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

429538e8 07-Sep-2021 SeongJae Park <sjpark@amazon.de>

mm/damon/dbgfs: export kdamond pid to the user space

For CPU usage accounting, knowing pid of the monitoring thread could be
helpful. For example, users could use cpuaccount cgroups with the pid.

This commit therefore exports the pid of currently running monitoring
thread to the user space via 'kdamond_pid' file in the debugfs directory.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210716081449.22187-9-sj38.park@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: SeongJae Park <sjpark@amazon.de>
Reviewed-by: Fernand Sieber <sieberf@amazon.com>
Cc: Alexander Shishkin <alexander.shishkin@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Amit Shah <amit@kernel.org>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Brendan Higgins <brendanhiggins@google.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: David Woodhouse <dwmw@amazon.com>
Cc: Fan Du <fan.du@intel.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <greg@kroah.com>
Cc: Greg Thelen <gthelen@google.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: Jonathan Cameron <Jonathan.Cameron@huawei.com>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Leonard Foerster <foersleo@amazon.de>
Cc: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Cc: Markus Boehme <markubo@amazon.de>
Cc: Maximilian Heyne <mheyne@amazon.de>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Namhyung Kim <namhyung@kernel.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Steven Rostedt (VMware) <rostedt@goodmis.org>
Cc: Vladimir Davydov <vdavydov.dev@gmail.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

4bc05954 07-Sep-2021 SeongJae Park <sjpark@amazon.de>

mm/damon: implement a debugfs-based user space interface

DAMON is designed to be used by kernel space code such as the memory
management subsystems, and therefore it provides only kernel space API.
That said, letting the user space control DAMON could provide some
benefits to them. For example, it will allow user space to analyze their
specific workloads and make their own special optimizations.

For such cases, this commit implements a simple DAMON application kernel
module, namely 'damon-dbgfs', which merely wraps the DAMON api and exports
those to the user space via the debugfs.

'damon-dbgfs' exports three files, ``attrs``, ``target_ids``, and
``monitor_on`` under its debugfs directory, ``<debugfs>/damon/``.

Attributes
----------

Users can read and write the ``sampling interval``, ``aggregation
interval``, ``regions update interval``, and min/max number of monitoring
target regions by reading from and writing to the ``attrs`` file. For
example, below commands set those values to 5 ms, 100 ms, 1,000 ms, 10,
1000 and check it again::

# cd <debugfs>/damon
# echo 5000 100000 1000000 10 1000 > attrs
# cat attrs
5000 100000 1000000 10 1000

Target IDs
----------

Some types of address spaces supports multiple monitoring target. For
example, the virtual memory address spaces monitoring can have multiple
processes as the monitoring targets. Users can set the targets by writing
relevant id values of the targets to, and get the ids of the current
targets by reading from the ``target_ids`` file. In case of the virtual
address spaces monitoring, the values should be pids of the monitoring
target processes. For example, below commands set processes having pids
42 and 4242 as the monitoring targets and check it again::

# cd <debugfs>/damon
# echo 42 4242 > target_ids
# cat target_ids
42 4242

Note that setting the target ids doesn't start the monitoring.

Turning On/Off
--------------

Setting the files as described above doesn't incur effect unless you
explicitly start the monitoring. You can start, stop, and check the
current status of the monitoring by writing to and reading from the
``monitor_on`` file. Writing ``on`` to the file starts the monitoring of
the targets with the attributes. Writing ``off`` to the file stops those.
DAMON also stops if every targets are invalidated (in case of the virtual
memory monitoring, target processes are invalidated when terminated).
Below example commands turn on, off, and check the status of DAMON::

# cd <debugfs>/damon
# echo on > monitor_on
# echo off > monitor_on
# cat monitor_on
off

Please note that you cannot write to the above-mentioned debugfs files
while the monitoring is turned on. If you write to the files while DAMON
is running, an error code such as ``-EBUSY`` will be returned.

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: remove unneeded "alloc failed" printks]
[akpm@linux-foundation.org: replace macro with static inline]

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210716081449.22187-8-sj38.park@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: SeongJae Park <sjpark@amazon.de>
Reviewed-by: Leonard Foerster <foersleo@amazon.de>
Reviewed-by: Fernand Sieber <sieberf@amazon.com>
Cc: Alexander Shishkin <alexander.shishkin@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Amit Shah <amit@kernel.org>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Brendan Higgins <brendanhiggins@google.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: David Woodhouse <dwmw@amazon.com>
Cc: Fan Du <fan.du@intel.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <greg@kroah.com>
Cc: Greg Thelen <gthelen@google.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: Jonathan Cameron <Jonathan.Cameron@huawei.com>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Cc: Markus Boehme <markubo@amazon.de>
Cc: Maximilian Heyne <mheyne@amazon.de>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Namhyung Kim <namhyung@kernel.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Steven Rostedt (VMware) <rostedt@goodmis.org>
Cc: Vladimir Davydov <vdavydov.dev@gmail.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

2fcb9362 07-Sep-2021 SeongJae Park <sjpark@amazon.de>

mm/damon: add a tracepoint

This commit adds a tracepoint for DAMON. It traces the monitoring results
of each region for each aggregation interval. Using this, DAMON can
easily integrated with tracepoints supporting tools such as perf.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210716081449.22187-7-sj38.park@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: SeongJae Park <sjpark@amazon.de>
Reviewed-by: Leonard Foerster <foersleo@amazon.de>
Reviewed-by: Steven Rostedt (VMware) <rostedt@goodmis.org>
Reviewed-by: Fernand Sieber <sieberf@amazon.com>
Acked-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Alexander Shishkin <alexander.shishkin@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Amit Shah <amit@kernel.org>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Brendan Higgins <brendanhiggins@google.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: David Woodhouse <dwmw@amazon.com>
Cc: Fan Du <fan.du@intel.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <greg@kroah.com>
Cc: Greg Thelen <gthelen@google.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: Jonathan Cameron <Jonathan.Cameron@huawei.com>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Cc: Markus Boehme <markubo@amazon.de>
Cc: Maximilian Heyne <mheyne@amazon.de>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Namhyung Kim <namhyung@kernel.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Vladimir Davydov <vdavydov.dev@gmail.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

3f49584b 07-Sep-2021 SeongJae Park <sjpark@amazon.de>

mm/damon: implement primitives for the virtual memory address spaces

This commit introduces a reference implementation of the address space
specific low level primitives for the virtual address space, so that users
of DAMON can easily monitor the data accesses on virtual address spaces of
specific processes by simply configuring the implementation to be used by
DAMON.

The low level primitives for the fundamental access monitoring are defined
in two parts:

1. Identification of the monitoring target address range for the address
space.
2. Access check of specific address range in the target space.

The reference implementation for the virtual address space does the works
as below.

PTE Accessed-bit Based Access Check
-----------------------------------

The implementation uses PTE Accessed-bit for basic access checks. That
is, it clears the bit for the next sampling target page and checks whether
it is set again after one sampling period. This could disturb the reclaim
logic. DAMON uses ``PG_idle`` and ``PG_young`` page flags to solve the
conflict, as Idle page tracking does.

VMA-based Target Address Range Construction
-------------------------------------------

Only small parts in the super-huge virtual address space of the processes
are mapped to physical memory and accessed. Thus, tracking the unmapped
address regions is just wasteful. However, because DAMON can deal with
some level of noise using the adaptive regions adjustment mechanism,
tracking every mapping is not strictly required but could even incur a
high overhead in some cases. That said, too huge unmapped areas inside
the monitoring target should be removed to not take the time for the
adaptive mechanism.

For the reason, this implementation converts the complex mappings to three
distinct regions that cover every mapped area of the address space. Also,
the two gaps between the three regions are the two biggest unmapped areas
in the given address space. The two biggest unmapped areas would be the
gap between the heap and the uppermost mmap()-ed region, and the gap
between the lowermost mmap()-ed region and the stack in most of the cases.
Because these gaps are exceptionally huge in usual address spaces,
excluding these will be sufficient to make a reasonable trade-off. Below
shows this in detail::

<heap>
<BIG UNMAPPED REGION 1>
<uppermost mmap()-ed region>
(small mmap()-ed regions and munmap()-ed regions)
<lowermost mmap()-ed region>
<BIG UNMAPPED REGION 2>
<stack>

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: mm/damon/vaddr.c needs highmem.h for kunmap_atomic()]
[sjpark@amazon.de: remove unnecessary PAGE_EXTENSION setup]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210806095153.6444-2-sj38.park@gmail.com
[sjpark@amazon.de: safely walk page table]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210831161800.29419-1-sj38.park@gmail.com

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210716081449.22187-6-sj38.park@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: SeongJae Park <sjpark@amazon.de>
Reviewed-by: Leonard Foerster <foersleo@amazon.de>
Reviewed-by: Fernand Sieber <sieberf@amazon.com>
Acked-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Alexander Shishkin <alexander.shishkin@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Amit Shah <amit@kernel.org>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Brendan Higgins <brendanhiggins@google.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: David Woodhouse <dwmw@amazon.com>
Cc: Fan Du <fan.du@intel.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <greg@kroah.com>
Cc: Greg Thelen <gthelen@google.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: Jonathan Cameron <Jonathan.Cameron@huawei.com>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Cc: Markus Boehme <markubo@amazon.de>
Cc: Maximilian Heyne <mheyne@amazon.de>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Namhyung Kim <namhyung@kernel.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Steven Rostedt (VMware) <rostedt@goodmis.org>
Cc: Vladimir Davydov <vdavydov.dev@gmail.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

1c676e0d 07-Sep-2021 SeongJae Park <sjpark@amazon.de>

mm/idle_page_tracking: make PG_idle reusable

PG_idle and PG_young allow the two PTE Accessed bit users, Idle Page
Tracking and the reclaim logic concurrently work while not interfering
with each other. That is, when they need to clear the Accessed bit, they
set PG_young to represent the previous state of the bit, respectively.
And when they need to read the bit, if the bit is cleared, they further
read the PG_young to know whether the other has cleared the bit meanwhile
or not.

For yet another user of the PTE Accessed bit, we could add another page
flag, or extend the mechanism to use the flags. For the DAMON usecase,
however, we don't need to do that just yet. IDLE_PAGE_TRACKING and DAMON
are mutually exclusive, so there's only ever going to be one user of the
current set of flags.

In this commit, we split out the CONFIG options to allow for the use of
PG_young and PG_idle outside of idle page tracking.

In the next commit, DAMON's reference implementation of the virtual memory
address space monitoring primitives will use it.

[sjpark@amazon.de: set PAGE_EXTENSION for non-64BIT]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210806095153.6444-1-sj38.park@gmail.com
[akpm@linux-foundation.org: tweak Kconfig text]
[sjpark@amazon.de: hide PAGE_IDLE_FLAG from users]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210813081238.34705-1-sj38.park@gmail.com

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210716081449.22187-5-sj38.park@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: SeongJae Park <sjpark@amazon.de>
Reviewed-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Fernand Sieber <sieberf@amazon.com>
Cc: Alexander Shishkin <alexander.shishkin@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Amit Shah <amit@kernel.org>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Brendan Higgins <brendanhiggins@google.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: David Woodhouse <dwmw@amazon.com>
Cc: Fan Du <fan.du@intel.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <greg@kroah.com>
Cc: Greg Thelen <gthelen@google.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: Jonathan Cameron <Jonathan.Cameron@huawei.com>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Leonard Foerster <foersleo@amazon.de>
Cc: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Cc: Markus Boehme <markubo@amazon.de>
Cc: Maximilian Heyne <mheyne@amazon.de>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Namhyung Kim <namhyung@kernel.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Steven Rostedt (VMware) <rostedt@goodmis.org>
Cc: Vladimir Davydov <vdavydov.dev@gmail.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

b9a6ac4e 07-Sep-2021 SeongJae Park <sjpark@amazon.de>

mm/damon: adaptively adjust regions

Even somehow the initial monitoring target regions are well constructed to
fulfill the assumption (pages in same region have similar access
frequencies), the data access pattern can be dynamically changed. This
will result in low monitoring quality. To keep the assumption as much as
possible, DAMON adaptively merges and splits each region based on their
access frequency.

For each ``aggregation interval``, it compares the access frequencies of
adjacent regions and merges those if the frequency difference is small.
Then, after it reports and clears the aggregated access frequency of each
region, it splits each region into two or three regions if the total
number of regions will not exceed the user-specified maximum number of
regions after the split.

In this way, DAMON provides its best-effort quality and minimal overhead
while keeping the upper-bound overhead that users set.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210716081449.22187-4-sj38.park@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: SeongJae Park <sjpark@amazon.de>
Reviewed-by: Leonard Foerster <foersleo@amazon.de>
Reviewed-by: Fernand Sieber <sieberf@amazon.com>
Acked-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Alexander Shishkin <alexander.shishkin@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Amit Shah <amit@kernel.org>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Brendan Higgins <brendanhiggins@google.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: David Woodhouse <dwmw@amazon.com>
Cc: Fan Du <fan.du@intel.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <greg@kroah.com>
Cc: Greg Thelen <gthelen@google.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: Jonathan Cameron <Jonathan.Cameron@huawei.com>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Cc: Markus Boehme <markubo@amazon.de>
Cc: Maximilian Heyne <mheyne@amazon.de>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Namhyung Kim <namhyung@kernel.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Steven Rostedt (VMware) <rostedt@goodmis.org>
Cc: Vladimir Davydov <vdavydov.dev@gmail.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

f23b8eee 07-Sep-2021 SeongJae Park <sjpark@amazon.de>

mm/damon/core: implement region-based sampling

To avoid the unbounded increase of the overhead, DAMON groups adjacent
pages that are assumed to have the same access frequencies into a
region. As long as the assumption (pages in a region have the same
access frequencies) is kept, only one page in the region is required to
be checked. Thus, for each ``sampling interval``,

1. the 'prepare_access_checks' primitive picks one page in each region,
2. waits for one ``sampling interval``,
3. checks whether the page is accessed meanwhile, and
4. increases the access count of the region if so.

Therefore, the monitoring overhead is controllable by adjusting the
number of regions. DAMON allows both the underlying primitives and user
callbacks to adjust regions for the trade-off. In other words, this
commit makes DAMON to use not only time-based sampling but also
space-based sampling.

This scheme, however, cannot preserve the quality of the output if the
assumption is not guaranteed. Next commit will address this problem.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210716081449.22187-3-sj38.park@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: SeongJae Park <sjpark@amazon.de>
Reviewed-by: Leonard Foerster <foersleo@amazon.de>
Reviewed-by: Fernand Sieber <sieberf@amazon.com>
Acked-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Alexander Shishkin <alexander.shishkin@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Amit Shah <amit@kernel.org>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Brendan Higgins <brendanhiggins@google.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: David Woodhouse <dwmw@amazon.com>
Cc: Fan Du <fan.du@intel.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <greg@kroah.com>
Cc: Greg Thelen <gthelen@google.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: Jonathan Cameron <Jonathan.Cameron@huawei.com>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Cc: Markus Boehme <markubo@amazon.de>
Cc: Maximilian Heyne <mheyne@amazon.de>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Namhyung Kim <namhyung@kernel.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Steven Rostedt (VMware) <rostedt@goodmis.org>
Cc: Vladimir Davydov <vdavydov.dev@gmail.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

2224d848 07-Sep-2021 SeongJae Park <sjpark@amazon.de>

mm: introduce Data Access MONitor (DAMON)

Patch series "Introduce Data Access MONitor (DAMON)", v34.

Introduction
============

DAMON is a data access monitoring framework for the Linux kernel. The
core mechanisms of DAMON called 'region based sampling' and 'adaptive
regions adjustment' (refer to 'mechanisms.rst' in the 11th patch of this
patchset for the detail) make it

- accurate (The monitored information is useful for DRAM level memory
management. It might not appropriate for Cache-level accuracy,
though.),

- light-weight (The monitoring overhead is low enough to be applied
online while making no impact on the performance of the target
workloads.), and

- scalable (the upper-bound of the instrumentation overhead is
controllable regardless of the size of target workloads.).

Using this framework, therefore, several memory management mechanisms such
as reclamation and THP can be optimized to aware real data access
patterns. Experimental access pattern aware memory management
optimization works that incurring high instrumentation overhead will be
able to have another try.

Though DAMON is for kernel subsystems, it can be easily exposed to the
user space by writing a DAMON-wrapper kernel subsystem. Then, user space
users who have some special workloads will be able to write personalized
tools or applications for deeper understanding and specialized
optimizations of their systems.

DAMON is also merged in two public Amazon Linux kernel trees that based on
v5.4.y[1] and v5.10.y[2].

[1] https://github.com/amazonlinux/linux/tree/amazon-5.4.y/master/mm/damon
[2] https://github.com/amazonlinux/linux/tree/amazon-5.10.y/master/mm/damon

The userspace tool[1] is available, released under GPLv2, and actively
being maintained. I am also planning to implement another basic user
interface in perf[2]. Also, the basic test suite for DAMON is available
under GPLv2[3].

[1] https://github.com/awslabs/damo
[2] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-mm/20210107120729.22328-1-sjpark@amazon.com/
[3] https://github.com/awslabs/damon-tests

Long-term Plan
--------------

DAMON is a part of a project called Data Access-aware Operating System
(DAOS). As the name implies, I want to improve the performance and
efficiency of systems using fine-grained data access patterns. The
optimizations are for both kernel and user spaces. I will therefore
modify or create kernel subsystems, export some of those to user space and
implement user space library / tools. Below shows the layers and
components for the project.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Primitives: PTE Accessed bit, PG_idle, rmap, (Intel CMT), ...
Framework: DAMON
Features: DAMOS, virtual addr, physical addr, ...
Applications: DAMON-debugfs, (DARC), ...
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ KERNEL SPACE ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Raw Interface: debugfs, (sysfs), (damonfs), tracepoints, (sys_damon), ...

vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv USER SPACE vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv
Library: (libdamon), ...
Tools: DAMO, (perf), ...
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The components in parentheses or marked as '...' are not implemented yet
but in the future plan. IOW, those are the TODO tasks of DAOS project.
For more detail, please refer to the plans:
https://lore.kernel.org/linux-mm/20201202082731.24828-1-sjpark@amazon.com/

Evaluations
===========

We evaluated DAMON's overhead, monitoring quality and usefulness using 24
realistic workloads on my QEMU/KVM based virtual machine running a kernel
that v24 DAMON patchset is applied.

DAMON is lightweight. It increases system memory usage by 0.39% and slows
target workloads down by 1.16%.

DAMON is accurate and useful for memory management optimizations. An
experimental DAMON-based operation scheme for THP, namely 'ethp', removes
76.15% of THP memory overheads while preserving 51.25% of THP speedup.
Another experimental DAMON-based 'proactive reclamation' implementation,
'prcl', reduces 93.38% of residential sets and 23.63% of system memory
footprint while incurring only 1.22% runtime overhead in the best case
(parsec3/freqmine).

NOTE that the experimental THP optimization and proactive reclamation are
not for production but only for proof of concepts.

Please refer to the official document[1] or "Documentation/admin-guide/mm:
Add a document for DAMON" patch in this patchset for detailed evaluation
setup and results.

[1] https://damonitor.github.io/doc/html/latest-damon/admin-guide/mm/damon/eval.html

Real-world User Story
=====================

In summary, DAMON has used on production systems and proved its usefulness.

DAMON as a profiler
-------------------

We analyzed characteristics of a large scale production systems of our
customers using DAMON. The systems utilize 70GB DRAM and 36 CPUs. From
this, we were able to find interesting things below.

There were obviously different access pattern under idle workload and
active workload. Under the idle workload, it accessed large memory
regions with low frequency, while the active workload accessed small
memory regions with high freuqnecy.

DAMON found a 7GB memory region that showing obviously high access
frequency under the active workload. We believe this is the
performance-effective working set and need to be protected.

There was a 4KB memory region that showing highest access frequency under
not only active but also idle workloads. We think this must be a hottest
code section like thing that should never be paged out.

For this analysis, DAMON used only 0.3-1% of single CPU time. Because we
used recording-based analysis, it consumed about 3-12 MB of disk space per
20 minutes. This is only small amount of disk space, but we can further
reduce the disk usage by using non-recording-based DAMON features. I'd
like to argue that only DAMON can do such detailed analysis (finding 4KB
highest region in 70GB memory) with the light overhead.

DAMON as a system optimization tool
-----------------------------------

We also found below potential performance problems on the systems and made
DAMON-based solutions.

The system doesn't want to make the workload suffer from the page
reclamation and thus it utilizes enough DRAM but no swap device. However,
we found the system is actively reclaiming file-backed pages, because the
system has intensive file IO. The file IO turned out to be not
performance critical for the workload, but the customer wanted to ensure
performance critical file-backed pages like code section to not mistakenly
be evicted.

Using direct IO should or `mlock()` would be a straightforward solution,
but modifying the user space code is not easy for the customer.
Alternatively, we could use DAMON-based operation scheme[1]. By using it,
we can ask DAMON to track access frequency of each region and make
'process_madvise(MADV_WILLNEED)[2]' call for regions having specific size
and access frequency for a time interval.

We also found the system is having high number of TLB misses. We tried
'always' THP enabled policy and it greatly reduced TLB misses, but the
page reclamation also been more frequent due to the THP internal
fragmentation caused memory bloat. We could try another DAMON-based
operation scheme that applies 'MADV_HUGEPAGE' to memory regions having
>=2MB size and high access frequency, while applying 'MADV_NOHUGEPAGE' to
regions having <2MB size and low access frequency.

We do not own the systems so we only reported the analysis results and
possible optimization solutions to the customers. The customers satisfied
about the analysis results and promised to try the optimization guides.

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-mm/20201006123931.5847-1-sjpark@amazon.com/
[2] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-api/20200622192900.22757-4-minchan@kernel.org/

Comparison with Idle Page Tracking
==================================

Idle Page Tracking allows users to set and read idleness of pages using a
bitmap file which represents each page with each bit of the file. One
recommended usage of it is working set size detection. Users can do that
by

1. find PFN of each page for workloads in interest,
2. set all the pages as idle by doing writes to the bitmap file,
3. wait until the workload accesses its working set, and
4. read the idleness of the pages again and count pages became not idle.

NOTE: While Idle Page Tracking is for user space users, DAMON is primarily
designed for kernel subsystems though it can easily exposed to the user
space. Hence, this section only assumes such user space use of DAMON.

For what use cases Idle Page Tracking would be better?
------------------------------------------------------

1. Flexible usecases other than hotness monitoring.

Because Idle Page Tracking allows users to control the primitive (Page
idleness) by themselves, Idle Page Tracking users can do anything they
want. Meanwhile, DAMON is primarily designed to monitor the hotness of
each memory region. For this, DAMON asks users to provide sampling
interval and aggregation interval. For the reason, there could be some
use case that using Idle Page Tracking is simpler.

2. Physical memory monitoring.

Idle Page Tracking receives PFN range as input, so natively supports
physical memory monitoring.

DAMON is designed to be extensible for multiple address spaces and use
cases by implementing and using primitives for the given use case.
Therefore, by theory, DAMON has no limitation in the type of target
address space as long as primitives for the given address space exists.
However, the default primitives introduced by this patchset supports only
virtual address spaces.

Therefore, for physical memory monitoring, you should implement your own
primitives and use it, or simply use Idle Page Tracking.

Nonetheless, RFC patchsets[1] for the physical memory address space
primitives is already available. It also supports user memory same to
Idle Page Tracking.

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-mm/20200831104730.28970-1-sjpark@amazon.com/

For what use cases DAMON is better?
-----------------------------------

1. Hotness Monitoring.

Idle Page Tracking let users know only if a page frame is accessed or not.
For hotness check, the user should write more code and use more memory.
DAMON do that by itself.

2. Low Monitoring Overhead

DAMON receives user's monitoring request with one step and then provide
the results. So, roughly speaking, DAMON require only O(1) user/kernel
context switches.

In case of Idle Page Tracking, however, because the interface receives
contiguous page frames, the number of user/kernel context switches
increases as the monitoring target becomes complex and huge. As a result,
the context switch overhead could be not negligible.

Moreover, DAMON is born to handle with the monitoring overhead. Because
the core mechanism is pure logical, Idle Page Tracking users might be able
to implement the mechanism on their own, but it would be time consuming
and the user/kernel context switching will still more frequent than that
of DAMON. Also, the kernel subsystems cannot use the logic in this case.

3. Page granularity working set size detection.

Until v22 of this patchset, this was categorized as the thing Idle Page
Tracking could do better, because DAMON basically maintains additional
metadata for each of the monitoring target regions. So, in the page
granularity working set size detection use case, DAMON would incur (number
of monitoring target pages * size of metadata) memory overhead. Size of
the single metadata item is about 54 bytes, so assuming 4KB pages, about
1.3% of monitoring target pages will be additionally used.

All essential metadata for Idle Page Tracking are embedded in 'struct
page' and page table entries. Therefore, in this use case, only one
counter variable for working set size accounting is required if Idle Page
Tracking is used.

There are more details to consider, but roughly speaking, this is true in
most cases.

However, the situation changed from v23. Now DAMON supports arbitrary
types of monitoring targets, which don't use the metadata. Using that,
DAMON can do the working set size detection with no additional space
overhead but less user-kernel context switch. A first draft for the
implementation of monitoring primitives for this usage is available in a
DAMON development tree[1]. An RFC patchset for it based on this patchset
will also be available soon.

Since v24, the arbitrary type support is dropped from this patchset
because this patchset doesn't introduce real use of the type. You can
still get it from the DAMON development tree[2], though.

[1] https://github.com/sjp38/linux/tree/damon/pgidle_hack
[2] https://github.com/sjp38/linux/tree/damon/master

4. More future usecases

While Idle Page Tracking has tight coupling with base primitives (PG_Idle
and page table Accessed bits), DAMON is designed to be extensible for many
use cases and address spaces. If you need some special address type or
want to use special h/w access check primitives, you can write your own
primitives for that and configure DAMON to use those. Therefore, if your
use case could be changed a lot in future, using DAMON could be better.

Can I use both Idle Page Tracking and DAMON?
--------------------------------------------

Yes, though using them concurrently for overlapping memory regions could
result in interference to each other. Nevertheless, such use case would
be rare or makes no sense at all. Even in the case, the noise would bot
be really significant. So, you can choose whatever you want depending on
the characteristics of your use cases.

More Information
================

We prepared a showcase web site[1] that you can get more information.
There are

- the official documentations[2],
- the heatmap format dynamic access pattern of various realistic workloads for
heap area[3], mmap()-ed area[4], and stack[5] area,
- the dynamic working set size distribution[6] and chronological working set
size changes[7], and
- the latest performance test results[8].

[1] https://damonitor.github.io/_index
[2] https://damonitor.github.io/doc/html/latest-damon
[3] https://damonitor.github.io/test/result/visual/latest/rec.heatmap.0.png.html
[4] https://damonitor.github.io/test/result/visual/latest/rec.heatmap.1.png.html
[5] https://damonitor.github.io/test/result/visual/latest/rec.heatmap.2.png.html
[6] https://damonitor.github.io/test/result/visual/latest/rec.wss_sz.png.html
[7] https://damonitor.github.io/test/result/visual/latest/rec.wss_time.png.html
[8] https://damonitor.github.io/test/result/perf/latest/html/index.html

Baseline and Complete Git Trees
===============================

The patches are based on the latest -mm tree, specifically
v5.14-rc1-mmots-2021-07-15-18-47 of https://github.com/hnaz/linux-mm. You can
also clone the complete git tree:

$ git clone git://github.com/sjp38/linux -b damon/patches/v34

The web is also available:
https://github.com/sjp38/linux/releases/tag/damon/patches/v34

Development Trees
-----------------

There are a couple of trees for entire DAMON patchset series and features
for future release.

- For latest release: https://github.com/sjp38/linux/tree/damon/master
- For next release: https://github.com/sjp38/linux/tree/damon/next

Long-term Support Trees
-----------------------

For people who want to test DAMON but using LTS kernels, there are another
couple of trees based on two latest LTS kernels respectively and
containing the 'damon/master' backports.

- For v5.4.y: https://github.com/sjp38/linux/tree/damon/for-v5.4.y
- For v5.10.y: https://github.com/sjp38/linux/tree/damon/for-v5.10.y

Amazon Linux Kernel Trees
-------------------------

DAMON is also merged in two public Amazon Linux kernel trees that based on
v5.4.y[1] and v5.10.y[2].

[1] https://github.com/amazonlinux/linux/tree/amazon-5.4.y/master/mm/damon
[2] https://github.com/amazonlinux/linux/tree/amazon-5.10.y/master/mm/damon

Git Tree for Diff of Patches
============================

For easy review of diff between different versions of each patch, I
prepared a git tree containing all versions of the DAMON patchset series:
https://github.com/sjp38/damon-patches

You can clone it and use 'diff' for easy review of changes between
different versions of the patchset. For example:

$ git clone https://github.com/sjp38/damon-patches && cd damon-patches
$ diff -u damon/v33 damon/v34

Sequence Of Patches
===================

First three patches implement the core logics of DAMON. The 1st patch
introduces basic sampling based hotness monitoring for arbitrary types of
targets. Following two patches implement the core mechanisms for control
of overhead and accuracy, namely regions based sampling (patch 2) and
adaptive regions adjustment (patch 3).

Now the essential parts of DAMON is complete, but it cannot work unless
someone provides monitoring primitives for a specific use case. The
following two patches make it just work for virtual address spaces
monitoring. The 4th patch makes 'PG_idle' can be used by DAMON and the
5th patch implements the virtual memory address space specific monitoring
primitives using page table Accessed bits and the 'PG_idle' page flag.

Now DAMON just works for virtual address space monitoring via the kernel
space api. To let the user space users can use DAMON, following four
patches add interfaces for them. The 6th patch adds a tracepoint for
monitoring results. The 7th patch implements a DAMON application kernel
module, namely damon-dbgfs, that simply wraps DAMON and exposes DAMON
interface to the user space via the debugfs interface. The 8th patch
further exports pid of monitoring thread (kdamond) to user space for
easier cpu usage accounting, and the 9th patch makes the debugfs interface
to support multiple contexts.

Three patches for maintainability follows. The 10th patch adds
documentations for both the user space and the kernel space. The 11th
patch provides unit tests (based on the kunit) while the 12th patch adds
user space tests (based on the kselftest).

Finally, the last patch (13th) updates the MAINTAINERS file.

This patch (of 13):

DAMON is a data access monitoring framework for the Linux kernel. The
core mechanisms of DAMON make it

- accurate (the monitoring output is useful enough for DRAM level
performance-centric memory management; It might be inappropriate for
CPU cache levels, though),
- light-weight (the monitoring overhead is normally low enough to be
applied online), and
- scalable (the upper-bound of the overhead is in constant range
regardless of the size of target workloads).

Using this framework, hence, we can easily write efficient kernel space
data access monitoring applications. For example, the kernel's memory
management mechanisms can make advanced decisions using this.
Experimental data access aware optimization works that incurring high
access monitoring overhead could again be implemented on top of this.

Due to its simple and flexible interface, providing user space interface
would be also easy. Then, user space users who have some special
workloads can write personalized applications for better understanding and
optimizations of their workloads and systems.

===

Nevertheless, this commit is defining and implementing only basic access
check part without the overhead-accuracy handling core logic. The basic
access check is as below.

The output of DAMON says what memory regions are how frequently accessed
for a given duration. The resolution of the access frequency is
controlled by setting ``sampling interval`` and ``aggregation interval``.
In detail, DAMON checks access to each page per ``sampling interval`` and
aggregates the results. In other words, counts the number of the accesses
to each region. After each ``aggregation interval`` passes, DAMON calls
callback functions that previously registered by users so that users can
read the aggregated results and then clears the results. This can be
described in below simple pseudo-code::

init()
while monitoring_on:
for page in monitoring_target:
if accessed(page):
nr_accesses[page] += 1
if time() % aggregation_interval == 0:
for callback in user_registered_callbacks:
callback(monitoring_target, nr_accesses)
for page in monitoring_target:
nr_accesses[page] = 0
if time() % update_interval == 0:
update()
sleep(sampling interval)

The target regions constructed at the beginning of the monitoring and
updated after each ``regions_update_interval``, because the target regions
could be dynamically changed (e.g., mmap() or memory hotplug). The
monitoring overhead of this mechanism will arbitrarily increase as the
size of the target workload grows.

The basic monitoring primitives for actual access check and dynamic target
regions construction aren't in the core part of DAMON. Instead, it allows
users to implement their own primitives that are optimized for their use
case and configure DAMON to use those. In other words, users cannot use
current version of DAMON without some additional works.

Following commits will implement the core mechanisms for the
overhead-accuracy control and default primitives implementations.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210716081449.22187-1-sj38.park@gmail.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210716081449.22187-2-sj38.park@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: SeongJae Park <sjpark@amazon.de>
Reviewed-by: Leonard Foerster <foersleo@amazon.de>
Reviewed-by: Fernand Sieber <sieberf@amazon.com>
Acked-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Jonathan Cameron <Jonathan.Cameron@huawei.com>
Cc: Alexander Shishkin <alexander.shishkin@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Amit Shah <amit@kernel.org>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: David Woodhouse <dwmw@amazon.com>
Cc: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Cc: Fan Du <fan.du@intel.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <greg@kroah.com>
Cc: Greg Thelen <gthelen@google.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Maximilian Heyne <mheyne@amazon.de>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Namhyung Kim <namhyung@kernel.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Steven Rostedt (VMware) <rostedt@goodmis.org>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Vladimir Davydov <vdavydov.dev@gmail.com>
Cc: Brendan Higgins <brendanhiggins@google.com>
Cc: Markus Boehme <markubo@amazon.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

c40c6e59 07-Sep-2021 Marco Elver <elver@google.com>

kfence: test: fail fast if disabled at boot

Fail kfence_test fast if KFENCE was disabled at boot, instead of each test
case trying several seconds to allocate from KFENCE and failing. KUnit
will fail all test cases if kunit_suite::init returns an error.

Even if KFENCE was disabled, we still want the test to fail, so that CI
systems that parse KUnit output will alert on KFENCE being disabled
(accidentally or otherwise).

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210825105533.1247922-1-elver@google.com
Signed-off-by: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Reported-by: Kefeng Wang <wangkefeng.wang@huawei.com>
Tested-by: Kefeng Wang <wangkefeng.wang@huawei.com>
Acked-by: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>
Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

4bbf04aa 07-Sep-2021 Marco Elver <elver@google.com>

kfence: show cpu and timestamp in alloc/free info

Record cpu and timestamp on allocations and frees, and show them in
reports. Upon an error, this can help correlate earlier messages in the
kernel log via allocation and free timestamps.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210714175312.2947941-1-elver@google.com
Suggested-by: Joern Engel <joern@purestorage.com>
Signed-off-by: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Acked-by: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>
Acked-by: Joern Engel <joern@purestorage.com>
Cc: Yuanyuan Zhong <yzhong@purestorage.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

11086054 07-Sep-2021 Jordy Zomer <jordy@jordyzomer.github.io>

mm/secretmem: use refcount_t instead of atomic_t

When a secret memory region is active, memfd_secret disables hibernation.
One of the goals is to keep the secret data from being written to
persistent-storage.

It accomplishes this by maintaining a reference count to
`secretmem_users`. Once this reference is held your system can not be
hibernated due to the check in `hibernation_available()`. However,
because `secretmem_users` is of type `atomic_t`, reference counter
overflows are possible.

As you can see there's an `atomic_inc` for each `memfd` that is opened in
the `memfd_secret` syscall. If a local attacker succeeds to open 2^32
memfd's, the counter will wrap around to 0. This implies that you may
hibernate again, even though there are still regions of this secret
memory, thereby bypassing the security check.

In an attempt to fix this I have used `refcount_t` instead of `atomic_t`
which prevents reference counter overflows.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210820043339.2151352-1-jordy@pwning.systems
Signed-off-by: Jordy Zomer <jordy@pwning.systems>
Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>,
Cc: Jordy Zomer <jordy@jordyzomer.github.io>
Cc: James Bottomley <James.Bottomley@HansenPartnership.com>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

ea0eafea 07-Sep-2021 Changbin Du <changbin.du@intel.com>

mm: in_irq() cleanup

Replace the obsolete and ambiguos macro in_irq() with new macro
in_hardirq().

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210813145245.86070-1-changbin.du@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Changbin Du <changbin.du@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> [kmemleak]
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

395519b4 07-Sep-2021 Weizhao Ouyang <o451686892@gmail.com>

mm/early_ioremap.c: remove redundant early_ioremap_shutdown()

early_ioremap_reset() reserved a weak function so that architectures can
provide a specific cleanup. Now no architectures use it, remove this
redundant function.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210901082917.399953-1-o451686892@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Weizhao Ouyang <o451686892@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

8491502f 07-Sep-2021 Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>

mm: don't allow executable ioremap mappings

There is no need to execute from iomem (and most platforms it is
impossible anyway), so add the pgprot_nx() call similar to vmap.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210824091259.1324527-3-hch@lst.de
Signed-off-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

82a70ce0 07-Sep-2021 Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>

mm: move ioremap_page_range to vmalloc.c

Patch series "small ioremap cleanups".

The first patch moves a little code around the vmalloc/ioremap boundary
following a bigger move by Nick earlier. The second enforces
non-executable mapping on ioremap just like we do for vmap. No driver
currently uses executable mappings anyway, as they should.

This patch (of 2):

This keeps it together with the implementation, and to remove the
vmap_range wrapper.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210824091259.1324527-1-hch@lst.de
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210824091259.1324527-2-hch@lst.de
Signed-off-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Reviewed-by: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

fe3df441 07-Sep-2021 Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>

mm: remove redundant compound_head() calling

There is a READ_ONCE() in the macro of compound_head(), which will prevent
compiler from optimizing the code when there are more than once calling of
it in a function. Remove the redundant calling of compound_head() from
page_to_index() and page_add_file_rmap() for better code generation.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210811101431.83940-1-songmuchun@bytedance.com
Signed-off-by: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Reviewed-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: William Kucharski <william.kucharski@oracle.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

5ef5f810 07-Sep-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/memory_hotplug: use helper zone_is_zone_device() to simplify the code

Patch series "Cleanup and fixups for memory hotplug".

This series contains cleanup to use helper function to simplify the code.
Also we fix some potential bugs. More details can be found in the
respective changelogs.

This patch (of 3):

Use helper zone_is_zone_device() to simplify the code and remove some
explicit CONFIG_ZONE_DEVICE codes.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210821094246.10149-1-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210821094246.10149-2-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Reviewed-by: Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Chris Goldsworthy <cgoldswo@codeaurora.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

3fcebf90 07-Sep-2021 David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>

mm/memory_hotplug: improved dynamic memory group aware "auto-movable" online policy

Currently, the "auto-movable" online policy does not allow for hotplugged
KERNEL (ZONE_NORMAL) memory to increase the amount of MOVABLE memory we
can have, primarily, because there is no coordiantion across memory
devices and we don't want to create zone-imbalances accidentially when
unplugging memory.

However, within a single memory device it's different. Let's allow for
KERNEL memory within a dynamic memory group to allow for more MOVABLE
within the same memory group. The only thing we have to take care of is
that the managing driver avoids zone imbalances by unplugging MOVABLE
memory first, otherwise there can be corner cases where unplug of memory
could result in (accidential) zone imbalances.

virtio-mem is the only user of dynamic memory groups and recently added
support for prioritizing unplug of ZONE_MOVABLE over ZONE_NORMAL, so we
don't need a new toggle to enable it for dynamic memory groups.

We limit this handling to dynamic memory groups, because:

* We want to keep the runtime overhead for collecting stats when
onlining a single memory block small. We tend to have only a handful of
dynamic memory groups, but we can have quite some static memory groups
(e.g., 256 DIMMs).

* It doesn't make too much sense for static memory groups, as we try
onlining all applicable memory blocks either completely to ZONE_MOVABLE
or not. In ordinary operation, we won't have a mixture of zones within
a static memory group.

When adding memory to a dynamic memory group, we'll first online memory to
ZONE_MOVABLE as long as early KERNEL memory allows for it. Then, we'll
online the next unit(s) to ZONE_NORMAL, until we can online the next
unit(s) to ZONE_MOVABLE.

For a simple virtio-mem device with a MOVABLE:KERNEL ratio of 3:1, it will
result in a layout like:

[M][M][M][M][M][M][M][M][N][M][M][M][N][M][M][M]...
^ movable memory due to early kernel memory
^ allows for more movable memory ...
^-----^ ... here
^ allows for more movable memory ...
^-----^ ... here

While the created layout is sub-optimal when it comes to contiguous zones,
it gives us the maximum flexibility when dynamically growing/shrinking a
device; we can grow small VMs really big in small steps, and still shrink
reliably to e.g., 1/4 of the maximum VM size in this example, removing
full memory blocks along with meta data more reliably.

Mark dynamic memory groups in the xarray such that we can efficiently
iterate over them when collecting stats. In usual setups, we have one
virtio-mem device per NUMA node, and usually only a small number of NUMA
nodes.

Note: for now, there seems to be no compelling reason to make this
behavior configurable.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210806124715.17090-10-david@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Cc: Hui Zhu <teawater@gmail.com>
Cc: Jason Wang <jasowang@redhat.com>
Cc: Len Brown <lenb@kernel.org>
Cc: Marek Kedzierski <mkedzier@redhat.com>
Cc: "Michael S. Tsirkin" <mst@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Pankaj Gupta <pankaj.gupta.linux@gmail.com>
Cc: Pavel Tatashin <pasha.tatashin@soleen.com>
Cc: Rafael J. Wysocki <rafael.j.wysocki@intel.com>
Cc: "Rafael J. Wysocki" <rjw@rjwysocki.net>
Cc: Vitaly Kuznetsov <vkuznets@redhat.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Wei Yang <richard.weiyang@linux.alibaba.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

445fcf7c 07-Sep-2021 David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>

mm/memory_hotplug: memory group aware "auto-movable" online policy

Use memory groups to improve our "auto-movable" onlining policy:

1. For static memory groups (e.g., a DIMM), online a memory block MOVABLE
only if all other memory blocks in the group are either MOVABLE or could
be onlined MOVABLE. A DIMM will either be MOVABLE or not, not a mixture.

2. For dynamic memory groups (e.g., a virtio-mem device), online a
memory block MOVABLE only if all other memory blocks inside the
current unit are either MOVABLE or could be onlined MOVABLE. For a
virtio-mem device with a device block size with 512 MiB, all 128 MiB
memory blocks wihin a 512 MiB unit will either be MOVABLE or not, not
a mixture.

We have to pass the memory group to zone_for_pfn_range() to take the
memory group into account.

Note: for now, there seems to be no compelling reason to make this
behavior configurable.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210806124715.17090-9-david@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Cc: Hui Zhu <teawater@gmail.com>
Cc: Jason Wang <jasowang@redhat.com>
Cc: Len Brown <lenb@kernel.org>
Cc: Marek Kedzierski <mkedzier@redhat.com>
Cc: "Michael S. Tsirkin" <mst@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Pankaj Gupta <pankaj.gupta.linux@gmail.com>
Cc: Pavel Tatashin <pasha.tatashin@soleen.com>
Cc: Rafael J. Wysocki <rafael.j.wysocki@intel.com>
Cc: "Rafael J. Wysocki" <rjw@rjwysocki.net>
Cc: Vitaly Kuznetsov <vkuznets@redhat.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Wei Yang <richard.weiyang@linux.alibaba.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

836809ec 07-Sep-2021 David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>

mm/memory_hotplug: track present pages in memory groups

Let's track all present pages in each memory group. Especially, track
memory present in ZONE_MOVABLE and memory present in one of the kernel
zones (which really only is ZONE_NORMAL right now as memory groups only
apply to hotplugged memory) separately within a memory group, to prepare
for making smart auto-online decision for individual memory blocks within
a memory group based on group statistics.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210806124715.17090-5-david@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Cc: Hui Zhu <teawater@gmail.com>
Cc: Jason Wang <jasowang@redhat.com>
Cc: Len Brown <lenb@kernel.org>
Cc: Marek Kedzierski <mkedzier@redhat.com>
Cc: "Michael S. Tsirkin" <mst@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Pankaj Gupta <pankaj.gupta.linux@gmail.com>
Cc: Pavel Tatashin <pasha.tatashin@soleen.com>
Cc: Rafael J. Wysocki <rafael.j.wysocki@intel.com>
Cc: "Rafael J. Wysocki" <rjw@rjwysocki.net>
Cc: Vitaly Kuznetsov <vkuznets@redhat.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Wei Yang <richard.weiyang@linux.alibaba.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

028fc57a 07-Sep-2021 David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>

drivers/base/memory: introduce "memory groups" to logically group memory blocks

In our "auto-movable" memory onlining policy, we want to make decisions
across memory blocks of a single memory device. Examples of memory
devices include ACPI memory devices (in the simplest case a single DIMM)
and virtio-mem. For now, we don't have a connection between a single
memory block device and the real memory device. Each memory device
consists of 1..X memory block devices.

Let's logically group memory blocks belonging to the same memory device in
"memory groups". Memory groups can span multiple physical ranges and a
memory group itself does not contain any information regarding physical
ranges, only properties (e.g., "max_pages") necessary for improved memory
onlining.

Introduce two memory group types:

1) Static memory group: E.g., a single ACPI memory device, consisting
of 1..X memory resources. A memory group consists of 1..Y memory
blocks. The whole group is added/removed in one go. If any part
cannot get offlined, the whole group cannot be removed.

2) Dynamic memory group: E.g., a single virtio-mem device. Memory is
dynamically added/removed in a fixed granularity, called a "unit",
consisting of 1..X memory blocks. A unit is added/removed in one go.
If any part of a unit cannot get offlined, the whole unit cannot be
removed.

In case of 1) we usually want either all memory managed by ZONE_MOVABLE or
none. In case of 2) we usually want to have as many units as possible
managed by ZONE_MOVABLE. We want a single unit to be of the same type.

For now, memory groups are an internal concept that is not exposed to user
space; we might want to change that in the future, though.

add_memory() users can specify a mgid instead of a nid when passing the
MHP_NID_IS_MGID flag.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210806124715.17090-4-david@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Cc: Hui Zhu <teawater@gmail.com>
Cc: Jason Wang <jasowang@redhat.com>
Cc: Len Brown <lenb@kernel.org>
Cc: Marek Kedzierski <mkedzier@redhat.com>
Cc: "Michael S. Tsirkin" <mst@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Pankaj Gupta <pankaj.gupta.linux@gmail.com>
Cc: Pavel Tatashin <pasha.tatashin@soleen.com>
Cc: Rafael J. Wysocki <rafael.j.wysocki@intel.com>
Cc: "Rafael J. Wysocki" <rjw@rjwysocki.net>
Cc: Vitaly Kuznetsov <vkuznets@redhat.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Wei Yang <richard.weiyang@linux.alibaba.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

e83a437f 07-Sep-2021 David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>

mm/memory_hotplug: introduce "auto-movable" online policy

When onlining without specifying a zone (using "online" instead of
"online_kernel" or "online_movable"), we currently select a zone such that
existing zones are kept contiguous. This online policy made sense in the
past, where contiguous zones where required.

We'd like to implement smarter policies, however:

* User space has little insight. As one example, it has no idea which
memory blocks logically belong together (e.g., to a DIMM or to a
virtio-mem device).

* Drivers that add memory in separate memory blocks, especially
virtio-mem, want memory to get onlined right from the kernel when
adding.

So we really want to have onlining to differing zones managed in the
kernel, configured by user space.

We see more and more cases where we might eventually hotplug a lot of
memory in the future (e.g., eventually grow a 2 GiB VM to 64 GiB),
however:

* Resizing happens dynamically, in smaller steps in both directions
(e.g., 2 GiB -> 8 GiB -> 4 GiB -> 16 GiB ...)

* We still want as much flexibility as possible, especially,
hotunplugging as much memory as possible later.

We can really only use "online_movable" if we know that the amount of
memory we are going to hotplug upfront, and we know that it won't result
in a zone imbalance. So in our example, a 2 GiB VM that could grow to 64
GiB could currently not use "online_movable", and instead, "online_kernel"
would have to be used, resulting in worse (no) memory hotunplug
reliability.

Let's add a new "auto-movable" online policy that considers the current
zone ratios (global, per-node) to determine, whether we a memory block can
be onlined to ZONE_MOVABLE:

MOVABLE : KERNEL

However, internally we'll only consider the following ratio for now:

MOVABLE : KERNEL_EARLY

For now, we don't allow for hotplugged KERNEL memory to allow for more
MOVABLE memory, because there is no coordination across memory devices.
In follow-up patches, we will allow for more KERNEL memory within a memory
device to allow for more MOVABLE memory within the same memory device --
which only makes sense for special memory device types.

We base our calculation on "present pages", see the code comments for
details. Hotplugged memory will get online to ZONE_MOVABLE if the
configured ratio allows for it. Depending on the setup, this can result
in fragmented zones, which can make compaction slower and dynamic
allocation of gigantic pages when not using CMA less reliable (... which
is already pretty unreliable).

The old policy will be the default and called "contig-zones". In
follow-up patches, our new policy will use additional information, such as
memory groups, to make even smarter decisions across memory blocks.

Configuration:

* memory_hotplug.online_policy is used to switch between both polices
and defaults to "contig-zones".

* memory_hotplug.auto_movable_ratio defines the maximum ratio is in
percent and defaults to "301" -- allowing e.g., most 8 GiB machines to
grow to 32 GiB and have all hotplugged memory in ZONE_MOVABLE. The
additional percent accounts for a handful of lost present pages (e.g.,
firmware allocations). User space is expected to adjust this ratio when
enabling the new "auto-movable" policy, though.

* memory_hotplug.auto_movable_numa_aware considers numa node stats in
addition to global stats, and defaults to "true".

Note: just like the old policy, the new policy won't take things like
unmovable huge pages or memory ballooning that doesn't support balloon
compaction into account. User space has to configure onlining
accordingly.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210806124715.17090-3-david@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Cc: Hui Zhu <teawater@gmail.com>
Cc: Jason Wang <jasowang@redhat.com>
Cc: Len Brown <lenb@kernel.org>
Cc: Marek Kedzierski <mkedzier@redhat.com>
Cc: "Michael S. Tsirkin" <mst@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Pankaj Gupta <pankaj.gupta.linux@gmail.com>
Cc: Pavel Tatashin <pasha.tatashin@soleen.com>
Cc: Rafael J. Wysocki <rafael.j.wysocki@intel.com>
Cc: "Rafael J. Wysocki" <rjw@rjwysocki.net>
Cc: Vitaly Kuznetsov <vkuznets@redhat.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Wei Yang <richard.weiyang@linux.alibaba.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

4b097002 07-Sep-2021 David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>

mm: track present early pages per zone

Patch series "mm/memory_hotplug: "auto-movable" online policy and memory groups", v3.

I. Goal

The goal of this series is improving in-kernel auto-online support. It
tackles the fundamental problems that:

1) We can create zone imbalances when onlining all memory blindly to
ZONE_MOVABLE, in the worst case crashing the system. We have to know
upfront how much memory we are going to hotplug such that we can
safely enable auto-onlining of all hotplugged memory to ZONE_MOVABLE
via "online_movable". This is far from practical and only applicable in
limited setups -- like inside VMs under the RHV/oVirt hypervisor which
will never hotplug more than 3 times the boot memory (and the
limitation is only in place due to the Linux limitation).

2) We see more setups that implement dynamic VM resizing, hot(un)plugging
memory to resize VM memory. In these setups, we might hotplug a lot of
memory, but it might happen in various small steps in both directions
(e.g., 2 GiB -> 8 GiB -> 4 GiB -> 16 GiB ...). virtio-mem is the
primary driver of this upstream right now, performing such dynamic
resizing NUMA-aware via multiple virtio-mem devices.

Onlining all hotplugged memory to ZONE_NORMAL means we basically have
no hotunplug guarantees. Onlining all to ZONE_MOVABLE means we can
easily run into zone imbalances when growing a VM. We want a mixture,
and we want as much memory as reasonable/configured in ZONE_MOVABLE.
Details regarding zone imbalances can be found at [1].

3) Memory devices consist of 1..X memory block devices, however, the
kernel doesn't really track the relationship. Consequently, also user
space has no idea. We want to make per-device decisions.

As one example, for memory hotunplug it doesn't make sense to use a
mixture of zones within a single DIMM: we want all MOVABLE if
possible, otherwise all !MOVABLE, because any !MOVABLE part will easily
block the whole DIMM from getting hotunplugged.

As another example, virtio-mem operates on individual units that span
1..X memory blocks. Similar to a DIMM, we want a unit to either be all
MOVABLE or !MOVABLE. A "unit" can be thought of like a DIMM, however,
all units of a virtio-mem device logically belong together and are
managed (added/removed) by a single driver. We want as much memory of
a virtio-mem device to be MOVABLE as possible.

4) We want memory onlining to be done right from the kernel while adding
memory, not triggered by user space via udev rules; for example, this
is reqired for fast memory hotplug for drivers that add individual
memory blocks, like virito-mem. We want a way to configure a policy in
the kernel and avoid implementing advanced policies in user space.

The auto-onlining support we have in the kernel is not sufficient. All we
have is a) online everything MOVABLE (online_movable) b) online everything
!MOVABLE (online_kernel) c) keep zones contiguous (online). This series
allows configuring c) to mean instead "online movable if possible
according to the coniguration, driven by a maximum MOVABLE:KERNEL ratio"
-- a new onlining policy.

II. Approach

This series does 3 things:

1) Introduces the "auto-movable" online policy that initially operates on
individual memory blocks only. It uses a maximum MOVABLE:KERNEL ratio
to make a decision whether a memory block will be onlined to
ZONE_MOVABLE or not. However, in the basic form, hotplugged KERNEL
memory does not allow for more MOVABLE memory (details in the
patches). CMA memory is treated like MOVABLE memory.

2) Introduces static (e.g., DIMM) and dynamic (e.g., virtio-mem) memory
groups and uses group information to make decisions in the
"auto-movable" online policy across memory blocks of a single memory
device (modeled as memory group). More details can be found in patch
#3 or in the DIMM example below.

3) Maximizes ZONE_MOVABLE memory within dynamic memory groups, by
allowing ZONE_NORMAL memory within a dynamic memory group to allow for
more ZONE_MOVABLE memory within the same memory group. The target use
case is dynamic VM resizing using virtio-mem. See the virtio-mem
example below.

I remember that the basic idea of using a ratio to implement a policy in
the kernel was once mentioned by Vitaly Kuznetsov, but I might be wrong (I
lost the pointer to that discussion).

For me, the main use case is using it along with virtio-mem (and DIMMs /
ppc64 dlpar where necessary) for dynamic resizing of VMs, increasing the
amount of memory we can hotunplug reliably again if we might eventually
hotplug a lot of memory to a VM.

III. Target Usage

The target usage will be:

1) Linux boots with "mhp_default_online_type=offline"

2) User space (e.g., systemd unit) configures memory onlining (according
to a config file and system properties), for example:
* Setting memory_hotplug.online_policy=auto-movable
* Setting memory_hotplug.auto_movable_ratio=301
* Setting memory_hotplug.auto_movable_numa_aware=true

3) User space enabled auto onlining via "echo online >
/sys/devices/system/memory/auto_online_blocks"

4) User space triggers manual onlining of all already-offline memory
blocks (go over offline memory blocks and set them to "online")

IV. Example

For DIMMs, hotplugging 4 GiB DIMMs to a 4 GiB VM with a configured ratio of
301% results in the following layout:
Memory block 0-15: DMA32 (early)
Memory block 32-47: Normal (early)
Memory block 48-79: Movable (DIMM 0)
Memory block 80-111: Movable (DIMM 1)
Memory block 112-143: Movable (DIMM 2)
Memory block 144-275: Normal (DIMM 3)
Memory block 176-207: Normal (DIMM 4)
... all Normal
(-> hotplugged Normal memory does not allow for more Movable memory)

For virtio-mem, using a simple, single virtio-mem device with a 4 GiB VM
will result in the following layout:
Memory block 0-15: DMA32 (early)
Memory block 32-47: Normal (early)
Memory block 48-143: Movable (virtio-mem, first 12 GiB)
Memory block 144: Normal (virtio-mem, next 128 MiB)
Memory block 145-147: Movable (virtio-mem, next 384 MiB)
Memory block 148: Normal (virtio-mem, next 128 MiB)
Memory block 149-151: Movable (virtio-mem, next 384 MiB)
... Normal/Movable mixture as above
(-> hotplugged Normal memory allows for more Movable memory within
the same device)

Which gives us maximum flexibility when dynamically growing/shrinking a
VM in smaller steps.

V. Doc Update

I'll update the memory-hotplug.rst documentation, once the overhaul [1] is
usptream. Until then, details can be found in patch #2.

VI. Future Work

1) Use memory groups for ppc64 dlpar
2) Being able to specify a portion of (early) kernel memory that will be
excluded from the ratio. Like "128 MiB globally/per node" are excluded.

This might be helpful when starting VMs with extremely small memory
footprint (e.g., 128 MiB) and hotplugging memory later -- not wanting
the first hotplugged units getting onlined to ZONE_MOVABLE. One
alternative would be a trigger to not consider ZONE_DMA memory
in the ratio. We'll have to see if this is really rrequired.
3) Indicate to user space that MOVABLE might be a bad idea -- especially
relevant when memory ballooning without support for balloon compaction
is active.

This patch (of 9):

For implementing a new memory onlining policy, which determines when to
online memory blocks to ZONE_MOVABLE semi-automatically, we need the
number of present early (boot) pages -- present pages excluding hotplugged
pages. Let's track these pages per zone.

Pass a page instead of the zone to adjust_present_page_count(), similar as
adjust_managed_page_count() and derive the zone from the page.

It's worth noting that a memory block to be offlined/onlined is either
completely "early" or "not early". add_memory() and friends can only add
complete memory blocks and we only online/offline complete (individual)
memory blocks.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210806124715.17090-1-david@redhat.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210806124715.17090-2-david@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Vitaly Kuznetsov <vkuznets@redhat.com>
Cc: "Michael S. Tsirkin" <mst@redhat.com>
Cc: Jason Wang <jasowang@redhat.com>
Cc: Marek Kedzierski <mkedzier@redhat.com>
Cc: Hui Zhu <teawater@gmail.com>
Cc: Pankaj Gupta <pankaj.gupta.linux@gmail.com>
Cc: Wei Yang <richard.weiyang@linux.alibaba.com>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>
Cc: "Rafael J. Wysocki" <rjw@rjwysocki.net>
Cc: Len Brown <lenb@kernel.org>
Cc: Pavel Tatashin <pasha.tatashin@soleen.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Cc: Rafael J. Wysocki <rafael.j.wysocki@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

e1c158e4 07-Sep-2021 David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>

mm/memory_hotplug: remove nid parameter from remove_memory() and friends

There is only a single user remaining. We can simply lookup the nid only
used for node offlining purposes when walking our memory blocks. We don't
expect to remove multi-nid ranges; and if we'd ever do, we most probably
don't care about removing multi-nid ranges that actually result in empty
nodes.

If ever required, we can detect the "multi-nid" scenario and simply try
offlining all online nodes.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210712124052.26491-4-david@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au> (powerpc)
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: "Rafael J. Wysocki" <rjw@rjwysocki.net>
Cc: Len Brown <lenb@kernel.org>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Vishal Verma <vishal.l.verma@intel.com>
Cc: Dave Jiang <dave.jiang@intel.com>
Cc: "Michael S. Tsirkin" <mst@redhat.com>
Cc: Jason Wang <jasowang@redhat.com>
Cc: Nathan Lynch <nathanl@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Laurent Dufour <ldufour@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: "Aneesh Kumar K.V" <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Scott Cheloha <cheloha@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Anton Blanchard <anton@ozlabs.org>
Cc: Andy Lutomirski <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Cc: Ard Biesheuvel <ardb@kernel.org>
Cc: Baoquan He <bhe@redhat.com>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Christian Borntraeger <borntraeger@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@c-s.fr>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <hca@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Jia He <justin.he@arm.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: Kefeng Wang <wangkefeng.wang@huawei.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Michel Lespinasse <michel@lespinasse.org>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Pankaj Gupta <pankaj.gupta@ionos.com>
Cc: Pankaj Gupta <pankaj.gupta.linux@gmail.com>
Cc: Pavel Tatashin <pasha.tatashin@soleen.com>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Pierre Morel <pmorel@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: "Rafael J. Wysocki" <rafael.j.wysocki@intel.com>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Sergei Trofimovich <slyfox@gentoo.org>
Cc: Thiago Jung Bauermann <bauerman@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Vasily Gorbik <gor@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Vitaly Kuznetsov <vkuznets@redhat.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Wei Yang <richard.weiyang@linux.alibaba.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

65a2aa5f 07-Sep-2021 David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>

mm/memory_hotplug: remove nid parameter from arch_remove_memory()

The parameter is unused, let's remove it.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210712124052.26491-3-david@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Acked-by: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au> [powerpc]
Acked-by: Heiko Carstens <hca@linux.ibm.com> [s390]
Reviewed-by: Pankaj Gupta <pankaj.gupta@ionos.com>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <hca@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Vasily Gorbik <gor@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Christian Borntraeger <borntraeger@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Andy Lutomirski <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Cc: Ard Biesheuvel <ardb@kernel.org>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: Pavel Tatashin <pasha.tatashin@soleen.com>
Cc: Baoquan He <bhe@redhat.com>
Cc: Laurent Dufour <ldufour@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Sergei Trofimovich <slyfox@gentoo.org>
Cc: Kefeng Wang <wangkefeng.wang@huawei.com>
Cc: Michel Lespinasse <michel@lespinasse.org>
Cc: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@c-s.fr>
Cc: "Aneesh Kumar K.V" <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Thiago Jung Bauermann <bauerman@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: Pierre Morel <pmorel@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Jia He <justin.he@arm.com>
Cc: Anton Blanchard <anton@ozlabs.org>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Dave Jiang <dave.jiang@intel.com>
Cc: Jason Wang <jasowang@redhat.com>
Cc: Len Brown <lenb@kernel.org>
Cc: "Michael S. Tsirkin" <mst@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Nathan Lynch <nathanl@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Pankaj Gupta <pankaj.gupta.linux@gmail.com>
Cc: "Rafael J. Wysocki" <rafael.j.wysocki@intel.com>
Cc: "Rafael J. Wysocki" <rjw@rjwysocki.net>
Cc: Scott Cheloha <cheloha@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Vishal Verma <vishal.l.verma@intel.com>
Cc: Vitaly Kuznetsov <vkuznets@redhat.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Wei Yang <richard.weiyang@linux.alibaba.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

7cf209ba 07-Sep-2021 David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>

mm/memory_hotplug: use "unsigned long" for PFN in zone_for_pfn_range()

Patch series "mm/memory_hotplug: preparatory patches for new online policy and memory"

These are all cleanups and one fix previously sent as part of [1]:
[PATCH v1 00/12] mm/memory_hotplug: "auto-movable" online policy and memory
groups.

These patches make sense even without the other series, therefore I pulled
them out to make the other series easier to digest.

[1] https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210607195430.48228-1-david@redhat.com

This patch (of 4):

Checkpatch complained on a follow-up patch that we are using "unsigned"
here, which defaults to "unsigned int" and checkpatch is correct.

As we will search for a fitting zone using the wrong pfn, we might end
up onlining memory to one of the special kernel zones, such as ZONE_DMA,
which can end badly as the onlined memory does not satisfy properties of
these zones.

Use "unsigned long" instead, just as we do in other places when handling
PFNs. This can bite us once we have physical addresses in the range of
multiple TB.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210712124052.26491-2-david@redhat.com
Fixes: e5e689302633 ("mm, memory_hotplug: display allowed zones in the preferred ordering")
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Pankaj Gupta <pankaj.gupta@ionos.com>
Reviewed-by: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Vitaly Kuznetsov <vkuznets@redhat.com>
Cc: "Michael S. Tsirkin" <mst@redhat.com>
Cc: Jason Wang <jasowang@redhat.com>
Cc: Pankaj Gupta <pankaj.gupta.linux@gmail.com>
Cc: Wei Yang <richard.weiyang@linux.alibaba.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>
Cc: "Rafael J. Wysocki" <rjw@rjwysocki.net>
Cc: Len Brown <lenb@kernel.org>
Cc: Pavel Tatashin <pasha.tatashin@soleen.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <hca@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: virtualization@lists.linux-foundation.org
Cc: Andy Lutomirski <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: "Aneesh Kumar K.V" <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Anton Blanchard <anton@ozlabs.org>
Cc: Ard Biesheuvel <ardb@kernel.org>
Cc: Baoquan He <bhe@redhat.com>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Christian Borntraeger <borntraeger@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@c-s.fr>
Cc: Dave Jiang <dave.jiang@intel.com>
Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Jia He <justin.he@arm.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: Kefeng Wang <wangkefeng.wang@huawei.com>
Cc: Laurent Dufour <ldufour@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Michel Lespinasse <michel@lespinasse.org>
Cc: Nathan Lynch <nathanl@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Pierre Morel <pmorel@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: "Rafael J. Wysocki" <rafael.j.wysocki@intel.com>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Scott Cheloha <cheloha@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Sergei Trofimovich <slyfox@gentoo.org>
Cc: Thiago Jung Bauermann <bauerman@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Vasily Gorbik <gor@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Vishal Verma <vishal.l.verma@intel.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

673d40c8 07-Sep-2021 Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>

mm: memory_hotplug: cleanup after removal of pfn_valid_within()

When test_pages_in_a_zone() used pfn_valid_within() is has some logic
surrounding pfn_valid_within() checks.

Since pfn_valid_within() is gone, this logic can be removed.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210713080035.7464-3-rppt@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Acked-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Cc: "Rafael J. Wysocki" <rafael@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

859a85dd 07-Sep-2021 Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>

mm: remove pfn_valid_within() and CONFIG_HOLES_IN_ZONE

Patch series "mm: remove pfn_valid_within() and CONFIG_HOLES_IN_ZONE".

After recent updates to freeing unused parts of the memory map, no
architecture can have holes in the memory map within a pageblock. This
makes pfn_valid_within() check and CONFIG_HOLES_IN_ZONE configuration
option redundant.

The first patch removes them both in a mechanical way and the second patch
simplifies memory_hotplug::test_pages_in_a_zone() that had
pfn_valid_within() surrounded by more logic than simple if.

This patch (of 2):

After recent changes in freeing of the unused parts of the memory map and
rework of pfn_valid() in arm and arm64 there are no architectures that can
have holes in the memory map within a pageblock and so nothing can enable
CONFIG_HOLES_IN_ZONE which guards non trivial implementation of
pfn_valid_within().

With that, pfn_valid_within() is always hardwired to 1 and can be
completely removed.

Remove calls to pfn_valid_within() and CONFIG_HOLES_IN_ZONE.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210713080035.7464-1-rppt@kernel.org
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210713080035.7464-2-rppt@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Acked-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Cc: "Rafael J. Wysocki" <rafael@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

cd1adf1b 07-Sep-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Revert "mm/gup: remove try_get_page(), call try_get_compound_head() directly"

This reverts commit 9857a17f206ff374aea78bccfb687f145368be2e.

That commit was completely broken, and I should have caught on to it
earlier. But happily, the kernel test robot noticed the breakage fairly
quickly.

The breakage is because "try_get_page()" is about avoiding the page
reference count overflow case, but is otherwise the exact same as a
plain "get_page()".

In contrast, "try_get_compound_head()" is an entirely different beast,
and uses __page_cache_add_speculative() because it's not just about the
page reference count, but also about possibly racing with the underlying
page going away.

So all the commentary about how

"try_get_page() has fallen a little behind in terms of maintenance,
try_get_compound_head() handles speculative page references more
thoroughly"

was just completely wrong: yes, try_get_compound_head() handles
speculative page references, but the point is that try_get_page() does
not, and must not.

So there's no lack of maintainance - there are fundamentally different
semantics.

A speculative page reference would be entirely wrong in "get_page()",
and it's entirely wrong in "try_get_page()". It's not about
speculation, it's purely about "uhhuh, you can't get this page because
you've tried to increment the reference count too much already".

The reason the kernel test robot noticed this bug was that it hit the
VM_BUG_ON() in __page_cache_add_speculative(), which is all about
verifying that the context of any speculative page access is correct.
But since that isn't what try_get_page() is all about, the VM_BUG_ON()
tests things that are not correct to test for try_get_page().

Reported-by: kernel test robot <oliver.sang@intel.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

49624efa 04-Sep-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge tag 'denywrite-for-5.15' of git://github.com/davidhildenbrand/linux

Pull MAP_DENYWRITE removal from David Hildenbrand:
"Remove all in-tree usage of MAP_DENYWRITE from the kernel and remove
VM_DENYWRITE.

There are some (minor) user-visible changes:

- We no longer deny write access to shared libaries loaded via legacy
uselib(); this behavior matches modern user space e.g. dlopen().

- We no longer deny write access to the elf interpreter after exec
completed, treating it just like shared libraries (which it often
is).

- We always deny write access to the file linked via /proc/pid/exe:
sys_prctl(PR_SET_MM_MAP/EXE_FILE) will fail if write access to the
file cannot be denied, and write access to the file will remain
denied until the link is effectivel gone (exec, termination,
sys_prctl(PR_SET_MM_MAP/EXE_FILE)) -- just as if exec'ing the file.

Cross-compiled for a bunch of architectures (alpha, microblaze, i386,
s390x, ...) and verified via ltp that especially the relevant tests
(i.e., creat07 and execve04) continue working as expected"

* tag 'denywrite-for-5.15' of git://github.com/davidhildenbrand/linux:
fs: update documentation of get_write_access() and friends
mm: ignore MAP_DENYWRITE in ksys_mmap_pgoff()
mm: remove VM_DENYWRITE
binfmt: remove in-tree usage of MAP_DENYWRITE
kernel/fork: always deny write access to current MM exe_file
kernel/fork: factor out replacing the current MM exe_file
binfmt: don't use MAP_DENYWRITE when loading shared libraries via uselib()


bd0e7491 21-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: convert kmem_cpu_slab protection to local_lock

Embed local_lock into struct kmem_cpu_slab and use the irq-safe versions of
local_lock instead of plain local_irq_save/restore. On !PREEMPT_RT that's
equivalent, with better lockdep visibility. On PREEMPT_RT that means better
preemption.

However, the cost on PREEMPT_RT is the loss of lockless fast paths which only
work with cpu freelist. Those are designed to detect and recover from being
preempted by other conflicting operations (both fast or slow path), but the
slow path operations assume they cannot be preempted by a fast path operation,
which is guaranteed naturally with disabled irqs. With local locks on
PREEMPT_RT, the fast paths now also need to take the local lock to avoid races.

In the allocation fastpath slab_alloc_node() we can just defer to the slowpath
__slab_alloc() which also works with cpu freelist, but under the local lock.
In the free fastpath do_slab_free() we have to add a new local lock protected
version of freeing to the cpu freelist, as the existing slowpath only works
with the page freelist.

Also update the comment about locking scheme in SLUB to reflect changes done
by this series.

[ Mike Galbraith <efault@gmx.de>: use local_lock() without irq in PREEMPT_RT
scope; debugging of RT crashes resulting in put_cpu_partial() locking changes ]
Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

25c00c50 21-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: use migrate_disable() on PREEMPT_RT

We currently use preempt_disable() (directly or via get_cpu_ptr()) to stabilize
the pointer to kmem_cache_cpu. On PREEMPT_RT this would be incompatible with
the list_lock spinlock. We can use migrate_disable() instead, but that
increases overhead on !PREEMPT_RT as it's an unconditional function call.

In order to get the best available mechanism on both PREEMPT_RT and
!PREEMPT_RT, introduce private slub_get_cpu_ptr() and slub_put_cpu_ptr()
wrappers and use them.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

e0a043aa 27-Jul-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: protect put_cpu_partial() with disabled irqs instead of cmpxchg

Jann Horn reported [1] the following theoretically possible race:

task A: put_cpu_partial() calls preempt_disable()
task A: oldpage = this_cpu_read(s->cpu_slab->partial)
interrupt: kfree() reaches unfreeze_partials() and discards the page
task B (on another CPU): reallocates page as page cache
task A: reads page->pages and page->pobjects, which are actually
halves of the pointer page->lru.prev
task B (on another CPU): frees page
interrupt: allocates page as SLUB page and places it on the percpu partial list
task A: this_cpu_cmpxchg() succeeds

which would cause page->pages and page->pobjects to end up containing
halves of pointers that would then influence when put_cpu_partial()
happens and show up in root-only sysfs files. Maybe that's acceptable,
I don't know. But there should probably at least be a comment for now
to point out that we're reading union fields of a page that might be
in a completely different state.

Additionally, the this_cpu_cmpxchg() approach in put_cpu_partial() is only safe
against s->cpu_slab->partial manipulation in ___slab_alloc() if the latter
disables irqs, otherwise a __slab_free() in an irq handler could call
put_cpu_partial() in the middle of ___slab_alloc() manipulating ->partial
and corrupt it. This becomes an issue on RT after a local_lock is introduced
in later patch. The fix means taking the local_lock also in put_cpu_partial()
on RT.

After debugging this issue, Mike Galbraith suggested [2] that to avoid
different locking schemes on RT and !RT, we can just protect put_cpu_partial()
with disabled irqs (to be converted to local_lock_irqsave() later) everywhere.
This should be acceptable as it's not a fast path, and moving the actual
partial unfreezing outside of the irq disabled section makes it short, and with
the retry loop gone the code can be also simplified. In addition, the race
reported by Jann should no longer be possible.

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/CAG48ez1mvUuXwg0YPH5ANzhQLpbphqk-ZS+jbRz+H66fvm4FcA@mail.gmail.com/
[2] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-rt-users/e3470ab357b48bccfbd1f5133b982178a7d2befb.camel@gmx.de/

Reported-by: Jann Horn <jannh@google.com>
Suggested-by: Mike Galbraith <efault@gmx.de>
Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

a2b4ae8b 03-Jun-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: make slab_lock() disable irqs with PREEMPT_RT

We need to disable irqs around slab_lock() (a bit spinlock) to make it
irq-safe. Most calls to slab_lock() are nested under spin_lock_irqsave() which
doesn't disable irqs on PREEMPT_RT, so add explicit disabling with PREEMPT_RT.
The exception is cmpxchg_double_slab() which already disables irqs, so use a
__slab_[un]lock() variant without irq disable there.

slab_[un]lock() thus needs a flags pointer parameter, which is unused on !RT.
free_debug_processing() now has two flags variables, which looks odd, but only
one is actually used - the one used in spin_lock_irqsave() on !RT and the one
used in slab_lock() on RT.

As a result, __cmpxchg_double_slab() and cmpxchg_double_slab() become
effectively identical on RT, as both will disable irqs, which is necessary on
RT as most callers of this function also rely on irqsaving lock operations.
Thus, assert that irqs are already disabled in __cmpxchg_double_slab() only on
!RT and also change the VM_BUG_ON assertion to the more standard lockdep_assert
one.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

94ef0304 16-Jul-2020 Sebastian Andrzej Siewior <bigeasy@linutronix.de>

mm: slub: make object_map_lock a raw_spinlock_t

The variable object_map is protected by object_map_lock. The lock is always
acquired in debug code and within already atomic context

Make object_map_lock a raw_spinlock_t.

Signed-off-by: Sebastian Andrzej Siewior <bigeasy@linutronix.de>
Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

5a836bf6 26-Feb-2021 Sebastian Andrzej Siewior <bigeasy@linutronix.de>

mm: slub: move flush_cpu_slab() invocations __free_slab() invocations out of IRQ context

flush_all() flushes a specific SLAB cache on each CPU (where the cache
is present). The deactivate_slab()/__free_slab() invocation happens
within IPI handler and is problematic for PREEMPT_RT.

The flush operation is not a frequent operation or a hot path. The
per-CPU flush operation can be moved to within a workqueue.

Because a workqueue handler, unlike IPI handler, does not disable irqs,
flush_slab() now has to disable them for working with the kmem_cache_cpu
fields. deactivate_slab() is safe to call with irqs enabled.

[vbabka@suse.cz: adapt to new SLUB changes]
Signed-off-by: Sebastian Andrzej Siewior <bigeasy@linutronix.de>
Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

08beb547 03-Jun-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slab: split out the cpu offline variant of flush_slab()

flush_slab() is called either as part IPI handler on given live cpu, or as a
cleanup on behalf of another cpu that went offline. The first case needs to
protect updating the kmem_cache_cpu fields with disabled irqs. Currently the
whole call happens with irqs disabled by the IPI handler, but the following
patch will change from IPI to workqueue, and flush_slab() will have to disable
irqs (to be replaced with a local lock later) in the critical part.

To prepare for this change, replace the call to flush_slab() for the dead cpu
handling with an opencoded variant that will not disable irqs nor take a local
lock.

Suggested-by: Mike Galbraith <efault@gmx.de>
Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

0e7ac738 20-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: don't disable irqs in slub_cpu_dead()

slub_cpu_dead() cleans up for an offlined cpu from another cpu and calls only
functions that are now irq safe, so we don't need to disable irqs anymore.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

7cf9f3ba 20-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: only disable irq with spin_lock in __unfreeze_partials()

__unfreeze_partials() no longer needs to have irqs disabled, except for making
the spin_lock operations irq-safe, so convert the spin_locks operations and
remove the separate irq handling.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

fc1455f4 20-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: separate detaching of partial list in unfreeze_partials() from unfreezing

Unfreezing partial list can be split to two phases - detaching the list from
struct kmem_cache_cpu, and processing the list. The whole operation does not
need to be protected by disabled irqs. Restructure the code to separate the
detaching (with disabled irqs) and unfreezing (with irq disabling to be reduced
in the next patch).

Also, unfreeze_partials() can be called from another cpu on behalf of a cpu
that is being offlined, where disabling irqs on the local cpu has no sense, so
restructure the code as follows:

- __unfreeze_partials() is the bulk of unfreeze_partials() that processes the
detached percpu partial list
- unfreeze_partials() detaches list from current cpu with irqs disabled and
calls __unfreeze_partials()
- unfreeze_partials_cpu() is to be called for the offlined cpu so it needs no
irq disabling, and is called from __flush_cpu_slab()
- flush_cpu_slab() is for the local cpu thus it needs to call
unfreeze_partials(). So it can't simply call
__flush_cpu_slab(smp_processor_id()) anymore and we have to open-code the
proper calls.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

c2f973ba 20-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: detach whole partial list at once in unfreeze_partials()

Instead of iterating through the live percpu partial list, detach it from the
kmem_cache_cpu at once. This is simpler and will allow further optimization.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

8de06a6f 20-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: discard slabs in unfreeze_partials() without irqs disabled

No need for disabled irqs when discarding slabs, so restore them before
discarding.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

f3ab8b6b 20-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: move irq control into unfreeze_partials()

unfreeze_partials() can be optimized so that it doesn't need irqs disabled for
the whole time. As the first step, move irq control into the function and
remove it from the put_cpu_partial() caller.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

cfdf836e 12-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: call deactivate_slab() without disabling irqs

The function is now safe to be called with irqs enabled, so move the calls
outside of irq disabled sections.

When called from ___slab_alloc() -> flush_slab() we have irqs disabled, so to
reenable them before deactivate_slab() we need to open-code flush_slab() in
___slab_alloc() and reenable irqs after modifying the kmem_cache_cpu fields.
But that means a IRQ handler meanwhile might have assigned a new page to
kmem_cache_cpu.page so we have to retry the whole check.

The remaining callers of flush_slab() are the IPI handler which has disabled
irqs anyway, and slub_cpu_dead() which will be dealt with in the following
patch.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

3406e91b 12-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: make locking in deactivate_slab() irq-safe

dectivate_slab() now no longer touches the kmem_cache_cpu structure, so it will
be possible to call it with irqs enabled. Just convert the spin_lock calls to
their irq saving/restoring variants to make it irq-safe.

Note we now have to use cmpxchg_double_slab() for irq-safe slab_lock(), because
in some situations we don't take the list_lock, which would disable irqs.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

a019d201 12-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: move reset of c->page and freelist out of deactivate_slab()

deactivate_slab() removes the cpu slab by merging the cpu freelist with slab's
freelist and putting the slab on the proper node's list. It also sets the
respective kmem_cache_cpu pointers to NULL.

By extracting the kmem_cache_cpu operations from the function, we can make it
not dependent on disabled irqs.

Also if we return a single free pointer from ___slab_alloc, we no longer have
to assign kmem_cache_cpu.page before deactivation or care if somebody preempted
us and assigned a different page to our kmem_cache_cpu in the process.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

4b1f449d 11-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: stop disabling irqs around get_partial()

The function get_partial() does not need to have irqs disabled as a whole. It's
sufficient to convert spin_lock operations to their irq saving/restoring
versions.

As a result, it's now possible to reach the page allocator from the slab
allocator without disabling and re-enabling interrupts on the way.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

9f101ee8 11-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: check new pages with restored irqs

Building on top of the previous patch, re-enable irqs before checking new
pages. alloc_debug_processing() is now called with enabled irqs so we need to
remove VM_BUG_ON(!irqs_disabled()); in check_slab() - there doesn't seem to be
a need for it anyway.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

3f2b77e3 11-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: validate slab from partial list or page allocator before making it cpu slab

When we obtain a new slab page from node partial list or page allocator, we
assign it to kmem_cache_cpu, perform some checks, and if they fail, we undo
the assignment.

In order to allow doing the checks without irq disabled, restructure the code
so that the checks are done first, and kmem_cache_cpu.page assignment only
after they pass.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

6c1dbb67 10-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: restore irqs around calling new_slab()

allocate_slab() currently re-enables irqs before calling to the page allocator.
It depends on gfpflags_allow_blocking() to determine if it's safe to do so.
Now we can instead simply restore irq before calling it through new_slab().
The other caller early_kmem_cache_node_alloc() is unaffected by this.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

fa417ab7 10-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: move disabling irqs closer to get_partial() in ___slab_alloc()

Continue reducing the irq disabled scope. Check for per-cpu partial slabs with
first with irqs enabled and then recheck with irqs disabled before grabbing
the slab page. Mostly preparatory for the following patches.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

0b303fb4 07-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: do initial checks in ___slab_alloc() with irqs enabled

As another step of shortening irq disabled sections in ___slab_alloc(), delay
disabling irqs until we pass the initial checks if there is a cached percpu
slab and it's suitable for our allocation.

Now we have to recheck c->page after actually disabling irqs as an allocation
in irq handler might have replaced it.

Because we call pfmemalloc_match() as one of the checks, we might hit
VM_BUG_ON_PAGE(!PageSlab(page)) in PageSlabPfmemalloc in case we get
interrupted and the page is freed. Thus introduce a pfmemalloc_match_unsafe()
variant that lacks the PageSlab check.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

e500059b 07-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: move disabling/enabling irqs to ___slab_alloc()

Currently __slab_alloc() disables irqs around the whole ___slab_alloc(). This
includes cases where this is not needed, such as when the allocation ends up in
the page allocator and has to awkwardly enable irqs back based on gfp flags.
Also the whole kmem_cache_alloc_bulk() is executed with irqs disabled even when
it hits the __slab_alloc() slow path, and long periods with disabled interrupts
are undesirable.

As a first step towards reducing irq disabled periods, move irq handling into
___slab_alloc(). Callers will instead prevent the s->cpu_slab percpu pointer
from becoming invalid via get_cpu_ptr(), thus preempt_disable(). This does not
protect against modification by an irq handler, which is still done by disabled
irq for most of ___slab_alloc(). As a small immediate benefit,
slab_out_of_memory() from ___slab_alloc() is now called with irqs enabled.

kmem_cache_alloc_bulk() disables irqs for its fastpath and then re-enables them
before calling ___slab_alloc(), which then disables them at its discretion. The
whole kmem_cache_alloc_bulk() operation also disables preemption.

When ___slab_alloc() calls new_slab() to allocate a new page, re-enable
preemption, because new_slab() will re-enable interrupts in contexts that allow
blocking (this will be improved by later patches).

The patch itself will thus increase overhead a bit due to disabled preemption
(on configs where it matters) and increased disabling/enabling irqs in
kmem_cache_alloc_bulk(), but that will be gradually improved in the following
patches.

Note in __slab_alloc() we need to change the #ifdef CONFIG_PREEMPT guard to
CONFIG_PREEMPT_COUNT to make sure preempt disable/enable is properly paired in
all configurations. On configs without involuntary preemption and debugging
the re-read of kmem_cache_cpu pointer is still compiled out as it was before.

[ Mike Galbraith <efault@gmx.de>: Fix kmem_cache_alloc_bulk() error path ]
Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

9b4bc85a 17-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: simplify kmem_cache_cpu and tid setup

In slab_alloc_node() and do_slab_free() fastpaths we need to guarantee that
our kmem_cache_cpu pointer is from the same cpu as the tid value. Currently
that's done by reading the tid first using this_cpu_read(), then the
kmem_cache_cpu pointer and verifying we read the same tid using the pointer and
plain READ_ONCE().

This can be simplified to just fetching kmem_cache_cpu pointer and then reading
tid using the pointer. That guarantees they are from the same cpu. We don't
need to read the tid using this_cpu_read() because the value will be validated
by this_cpu_cmpxchg_double(), making sure we are on the correct cpu and the
freelist didn't change by anyone preempting us since reading the tid.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

1572df7c 11-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: restructure new page checks in ___slab_alloc()

When we allocate slab object from a newly acquired page (from node's partial
list or page allocator), we usually also retain the page as a new percpu slab.
There are two exceptions - when pfmemalloc status of the page doesn't match our
gfp flags, or when the cache has debugging enabled.

The current code for these decisions is not easy to follow, so restructure it
and add comments. The new structure will also help with the following changes.
No functional change.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

75c8ff28 11-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: return slab page from get_partial() and set c->page afterwards

The function get_partial() finds a suitable page on a partial list, acquires
and returns its freelist and assigns the page pointer to kmem_cache_cpu.
In later patch we will need more control over the kmem_cache_cpu.page
assignment, so instead of passing a kmem_cache_cpu pointer, pass a pointer to a
pointer to a page that get_partial() can fill and the caller can assign the
kmem_cache_cpu.page pointer. No functional change as all of this still happens
with disabled IRQs.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

53a0de06 11-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: dissolve new_slab_objects() into ___slab_alloc()

The later patches will need more fine grained control over individual actions
in ___slab_alloc(), the only caller of new_slab_objects(), so dissolve it
there. This is a preparatory step with no functional change.

The only minor change is moving WARN_ON_ONCE() for using a constructor together
with __GFP_ZERO to new_slab(), which makes it somewhat less frequent, but still
able to catch a development change introducing a systematic misuse.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

2a904905 10-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: extract get_partial() from new_slab_objects()

The later patches will need more fine grained control over individual actions
in ___slab_alloc(), the only caller of new_slab_objects(), so this is a first
preparatory step with no functional change.

This adds a goto label that appears unnecessary at this point, but will be
useful for later changes.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>

b250e6d1 03-Sep-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge tag 'kbuild-v5.15' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/masahiroy/linux-kbuild

Pull Kbuild updates from Masahiro Yamada:

- Add -s option (strict mode) to merge_config.sh to make it fail when
any symbol is redefined.

- Show a warning if a different compiler is used for building external
modules.

- Infer --target from ARCH for CC=clang to let you cross-compile the
kernel without CROSS_COMPILE.

- Make the integrated assembler default (LLVM_IAS=1) for CC=clang.

- Add <linux/stdarg.h> to the kernel source instead of borrowing
<stdarg.h> from the compiler.

- Add Nick Desaulniers as a Kbuild reviewer.

- Drop stale cc-option tests.

- Fix the combination of CONFIG_TRIM_UNUSED_KSYMS and CONFIG_LTO_CLANG
to handle symbols in inline assembly.

- Show a warning if 'FORCE' is missing for if_changed rules.

- Various cleanups

* tag 'kbuild-v5.15' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/masahiroy/linux-kbuild: (39 commits)
kbuild: redo fake deps at include/ksym/*.h
kbuild: clean up objtool_args slightly
modpost: get the *.mod file path more simply
checkkconfigsymbols.py: Fix the '--ignore' option
kbuild: merge vmlinux_link() between ARCH=um and other architectures
kbuild: do not remove 'linux' link in scripts/link-vmlinux.sh
kbuild: merge vmlinux_link() between the ordinary link and Clang LTO
kbuild: remove stale *.symversions
kbuild: remove unused quiet_cmd_update_lto_symversions
gen_compile_commands: extract compiler command from a series of commands
x86: remove cc-option-yn test for -mtune=
arc: replace cc-option-yn uses with cc-option
s390: replace cc-option-yn uses with cc-option
ia64: move core-y in arch/ia64/Makefile to arch/ia64/Kbuild
sparc: move the install rule to arch/sparc/Makefile
security: remove unneeded subdir-$(CONFIG_...)
kbuild: sh: remove unused install script
kbuild: Fix 'no symbols' warning when CONFIG_TRIM_UNUSD_KSYMS=y
kbuild: Switch to 'f' variants of integrated assembler flag
kbuild: Shuffle blank line to improve comment meaning
...


976b805c 07-Jun-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: remove redundant unfreeze_partials() from put_cpu_partial()

Commit d6e0b7fa1186 ("slub: make dead caches discard free slabs immediately")
introduced cpu partial flushing for kmemcg caches, based on setting the target
cpu_partial to 0 and adding a flushing check in put_cpu_partial().
This code that sets cpu_partial to 0 was later moved by c9fc586403e7 ("slab:
introduce __kmemcg_cache_deactivate()") and ultimately removed by 9855609bde03
("mm: memcg/slab: use a single set of kmem_caches for all accounted
allocations"). However the check and flush in put_cpu_partial() was never
removed, although it's effectively a dead code. So this patch removes it.

Note that d6e0b7fa1186 also added preempt_disable()/enable() to
unfreeze_partials() which could be thus also considered unnecessary. But
further patches will rely on it, so keep it.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

84048039 20-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: don't disable irq for debug_check_no_locks_freed()

In slab_free_hook() we disable irqs around the debug_check_no_locks_freed()
call, which is unnecessary, as irqs are already being disabled inside the call.
This seems to be leftover from the past where there were more calls inside the
irq disabled sections. Remove the irq disable/enable operations.

Mel noted:
> Looks like it was needed for kmemcheck which went away back in 4.15

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

0a19e7dd 22-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: allocate private object map for validate_slab_cache()

validate_slab_cache() is called either to handle a sysfs write, or from a
self-test context. In both situations it's straightforward to preallocate a
private object bitmap instead of grabbing the shared static one meant for
critical sections, so let's do that.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

b3fd64e1 22-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: allocate private object map for debugfs listings

Slub has a static spinlock protected bitmap for marking which objects are on
freelist when it wants to list them, for situations where dynamically
allocating such map can lead to recursion or locking issues, and on-stack
bitmap would be too large.

The handlers of debugfs files alloc_traces and free_traces also currently use this
shared bitmap, but their syscall context makes it straightforward to allocate a
private map before entering locked sections, so switch these processing paths
to use a private bitmap.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

eafb1d64 28-May-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, slub: don't call flush_all() from slab_debug_trace_open()

slab_debug_trace_open() can only be called on caches with SLAB_STORE_USER flag
and as with all slub debugging flags, such caches avoid cpu or percpu partial
slabs altogether, so there's nothing to flush.

Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>

14726903 03-Sep-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge branch 'akpm' (patches from Andrew)

Merge misc updates from Andrew Morton:
"173 patches.

Subsystems affected by this series: ia64, ocfs2, block, and mm (debug,
pagecache, gup, swap, shmem, memcg, selftests, pagemap, mremap,
bootmem, sparsemem, vmalloc, kasan, pagealloc, memory-failure,
hugetlb, userfaultfd, vmscan, compaction, mempolicy, memblock,
oom-kill, migration, ksm, percpu, vmstat, and madvise)"

* emailed patches from Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>: (173 commits)
mm/madvise: add MADV_WILLNEED to process_madvise()
mm/vmstat: remove unneeded return value
mm/vmstat: simplify the array size calculation
mm/vmstat: correct some wrong comments
mm/percpu,c: remove obsolete comments of pcpu_chunk_populated()
selftests: vm: add COW time test for KSM pages
selftests: vm: add KSM merging time test
mm: KSM: fix data type
selftests: vm: add KSM merging across nodes test
selftests: vm: add KSM zero page merging test
selftests: vm: add KSM unmerge test
selftests: vm: add KSM merge test
mm/migrate: correct kernel-doc notation
mm: wire up syscall process_mrelease
mm: introduce process_mrelease system call
memblock: make memblock_find_in_range method private
mm/mempolicy.c: use in_task() in mempolicy_slab_node()
mm/mempolicy: unify the create() func for bind/interleave/prefer-many policies
mm/mempolicy: advertise new MPOL_PREFERRED_MANY
mm/hugetlb: add support for mempolicy MPOL_PREFERRED_MANY
...


d5fffc5a 02-Sep-2021 zhangkui <zhangkui@oppo.com>

mm/madvise: add MADV_WILLNEED to process_madvise()

There is a usecase in Android that an app process's memory is swapped out
by process_madvise() with MADV_PAGEOUT, such as the memory is swapped to
zram or a backing device. When the process is scheduled to running, like
switch to foreground, multiple page faults may cause the app dropped
frames.

To reduce the problem, System Management Software can read-ahead memory
of the process immediately when the app switches to forground. Calling
process_madvise() with MADV_WILLNEED can meet this need.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210804082010.12482-1-zhangkui@oppo.com
Signed-off-by: zhangkui <zhangkui@oppo.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

33090af9 02-Sep-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/vmstat: remove unneeded return value

The return value of pagetypeinfo_showfree and pagetypeinfo_showblockcount
are unused now. Remove them.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210715122911.15700-4-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

64632fd3 02-Sep-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/vmstat: simplify the array size calculation

We can replace the array_num * sizeof(array[0]) with sizeof(array) to
simplify the code.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210715122911.15700-3-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

ea15ba17 02-Sep-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/vmstat: correct some wrong comments

Patch series "Cleanup for vmstat".

This series contains cleanups to remove unneeded return value, correct
wrong comment and simplify the array size calculation. More details can
be found in the respective changelogs.

This patch (of 3):

Correct wrong fls(mem+1) to fls(mem)+1 and remove the duplicated comment
with quiet_vmstat().

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210715122911.15700-1-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210715122911.15700-2-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

31981450 02-Sep-2021 Jing Xiangfeng <jingxiangfeng@huawei.com>

mm/percpu,c: remove obsolete comments of pcpu_chunk_populated()

Commit b239f7daf553 ("percpu: set PCPU_BITMAP_BLOCK_SIZE to PAGE_SIZE")
removed the parameter 'for_alloc', so remove this comment.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/1630576043-21367-1-git-send-email-jingxiangfeng@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Jing Xiangfeng <jingxiangfeng@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

584ff0df 02-Sep-2021 Zhansaya Bagdauletkyzy <zhansayabagdaulet@gmail.com>

mm: KSM: fix data type

ksm_stable_node_chains_prune_millisecs is declared as int, but in
stable__node_chains_prune_millisecs_store(), it can store values up to
UINT_MAX. Change its type to unsigned int.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210806111351.GA71845@asus
Signed-off-by: Zhansaya Bagdauletkyzy <zhansayabagdaulet@gmail.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

c9bd7d18 02-Sep-2021 Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>

mm/migrate: correct kernel-doc notation

Use the expected "Return:" format to prevent a kernel-doc warning.

mm/migrate.c:1157: warning: Excess function parameter 'returns' description in 'next_demotion_node'

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210808203151.10632-1-rdunlap@infradead.org
Signed-off-by: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

884a7e59 02-Sep-2021 Suren Baghdasaryan <surenb@google.com>

mm: introduce process_mrelease system call

In modern systems it's not unusual to have a system component monitoring
memory conditions of the system and tasked with keeping system memory
pressure under control. One way to accomplish that is to kill
non-essential processes to free up memory for more important ones.
Examples of this are Facebook's OOM killer daemon called oomd and
Android's low memory killer daemon called lmkd.

For such system component it's important to be able to free memory quickly
and efficiently. Unfortunately the time process takes to free up its
memory after receiving a SIGKILL might vary based on the state of the
process (uninterruptible sleep), size and OPP level of the core the
process is running. A mechanism to free resources of the target process
in a more predictable way would improve system's ability to control its
memory pressure.

Introduce process_mrelease system call that releases memory of a dying
process from the context of the caller. This way the memory is freed in a
more controllable way with CPU affinity and priority of the caller. The
workload of freeing the memory will also be charged to the caller. The
operation is allowed only on a dying process.

After previous discussions [1, 2, 3] the decision was made [4] to
introduce a dedicated system call to cover this use case.

The API is as follows,

int process_mrelease(int pidfd, unsigned int flags);

DESCRIPTION
The process_mrelease() system call is used to free the memory of
an exiting process.

The pidfd selects the process referred to by the PID file
descriptor.
(See pidfd_open(2) for further information)

The flags argument is reserved for future use; currently, this
argument must be specified as 0.

RETURN VALUE
On success, process_mrelease() returns 0. On error, -1 is
returned and errno is set to indicate the error.

ERRORS
EBADF pidfd is not a valid PID file descriptor.

EAGAIN Failed to release part of the address space.

EINTR The call was interrupted by a signal; see signal(7).

EINVAL flags is not 0.

EINVAL The memory of the task cannot be released because the
process is not exiting, the address space is shared
with another live process or there is a core dump in
progress.

ENOSYS This system call is not supported, for example, without
MMU support built into Linux.

ESRCH The target process does not exist (i.e., it has terminated
and been waited on).

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20190411014353.113252-3-surenb@google.com/
[2] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-api/20201113173448.1863419-1-surenb@google.com/
[3] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-api/20201124053943.1684874-3-surenb@google.com/
[4] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-api/20201223075712.GA4719@lst.de/

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210809185259.405936-1-surenb@google.com
Signed-off-by: Suren Baghdasaryan <surenb@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Acked-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Acked-by: Christian Brauner <christian.brauner@ubuntu.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org>
Cc: Oleg Nesterov <oleg@redhat.com>
Cc: Jann Horn <jannh@google.com>
Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org>
Cc: Andy Lutomirski <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Christian Brauner <christian.brauner@ubuntu.com>
Cc: Florian Weimer <fweimer@redhat.com>
Cc: Jan Engelhardt <jengelh@inai.de>
Cc: Tim Murray <timmurray@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

a7259df7 02-Sep-2021 Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>

memblock: make memblock_find_in_range method private

There are a lot of uses of memblock_find_in_range() along with
memblock_reserve() from the times memblock allocation APIs did not exist.

memblock_find_in_range() is the very core of memblock allocations, so any
future changes to its internal behaviour would mandate updates of all the
users outside memblock.

Replace the calls to memblock_find_in_range() with an equivalent calls to
memblock_phys_alloc() and memblock_phys_alloc_range() and make
memblock_find_in_range() private method of memblock.

This simplifies the callers, ensures that (unlikely) errors in
memblock_reserve() are handled and improves maintainability of
memblock_find_in_range().

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210816122622.30279-1-rppt@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> [arm64]
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shtuemov@linux.intel.com>
Acked-by: Rafael J. Wysocki <rafael.j.wysocki@intel.com> [ACPI]
Acked-by: Russell King (Oracle) <rmk+kernel@armlinux.org.uk>
Acked-by: Nick Kossifidis <mick@ics.forth.gr> [riscv]
Tested-by: Guenter Roeck <linux@roeck-us.net>
Acked-by: Rob Herring <robh@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

38b031dd 02-Sep-2021 Vasily Averin <vvs@virtuozzo.com>

mm/mempolicy.c: use in_task() in mempolicy_slab_node()

Obsoleted in_intrrupt() include task context with disabled BH, it's better
to use in_task() instead.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/984ee771-4834-21da-801f-c15c18ddf4d1@virtuozzo.com
Signed-off-by: Vasily Averin <vvs@virtuozzo.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

be897d48 02-Sep-2021 Feng Tang <feng.tang@intel.com>

mm/mempolicy: unify the create() func for bind/interleave/prefer-many policies

As they all do the same thing: sanity check and save nodemask info, create
one mpol_new_nodemask() to reduce redundancy.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/1627970362-61305-6-git-send-email-feng.tang@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Feng Tang <feng.tang@intel.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Andi Kleen <ak@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Ben Widawsky <ben.widawsky@intel.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

a38a59fd 02-Sep-2021 Ben Widawsky <ben.widawsky@intel.com>

mm/mempolicy: advertise new MPOL_PREFERRED_MANY

Adds a new mode to the existing mempolicy modes, MPOL_PREFERRED_MANY.

MPOL_PREFERRED_MANY will be adequately documented in the internal
admin-guide with this patch. Eventually, the man pages for mbind(2),
get_mempolicy(2), set_mempolicy(2) and numactl(8) will also have text
about this mode. Those shall contain the canonical reference.

NUMA systems continue to become more prevalent. New technologies like
PMEM make finer grain control over memory access patterns increasingly
desirable. MPOL_PREFERRED_MANY allows userspace to specify a set of nodes
that will be tried first when performing allocations. If those
allocations fail, all remaining nodes will be tried. It's a straight
forward API which solves many of the presumptive needs of system
administrators wanting to optimize workloads on such machines. The mode
will work either per VMA, or per thread.

[Michal Hocko: refine kernel doc for MPOL_PREFERRED_MANY]

Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20200630212517.308045-13-ben.widawsky@intel.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/1627970362-61305-5-git-send-email-feng.tang@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Ben Widawsky <ben.widawsky@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Feng Tang <feng.tang@intel.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Andi Kleen <ak@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

cfcaa66f 02-Sep-2021 Ben Widawsky <ben.widawsky@intel.com>

mm/hugetlb: add support for mempolicy MPOL_PREFERRED_MANY

Implement the missing huge page allocation functionality while obeying the
preferred node semantics. This is similar to the implementation for
general page allocation, as it uses a fallback mechanism to try multiple
preferred nodes first, and then all other nodes.

To avoid adding too many "#ifdef CONFIG_NUMA" check, add a helper function
in mempolicy.h to check whether a mempolicy is MPOL_PREFERRED_MANY.

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix compiling issue when merging with other hugetlb patch]
[Thanks to 0day bot for catching the !CONFIG_NUMA compiling issue]
[mhocko@suse.com: suggest to remove the #ifdef CONFIG_NUMA check]
[ben.widawsky@intel.com: add helpers to avoid ifdefs]
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20200630212517.308045-12-ben.widawsky@intel.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/1627970362-61305-4-git-send-email-feng.tang@intel.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210809024430.GA46432@shbuild999.sh.intel.com
[nathan@kernel.org: initialize page to NULL in alloc_buddy_huge_page_with_mpol()]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210810200632.3812797-1-nathan@kernel.org

Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20200630212517.308045-12-ben.widawsky@intel.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/1627970362-61305-4-git-send-email-feng.tang@intel.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210809024430.GA46432@shbuild999.sh.intel.com
Signed-off-by: Ben Widawsky <ben.widawsky@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Feng Tang <feng.tang@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Nathan Chancellor <nathan@kernel.org>
Co-developed-by: Feng Tang <feng.tang@intel.com>
Suggested-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

4c54d949 02-Sep-2021 Feng Tang <feng.tang@intel.com>

mm/memplicy: add page allocation function for MPOL_PREFERRED_MANY policy

The semantics of MPOL_PREFERRED_MANY is similar to MPOL_PREFERRED, that it
will first try to allocate memory from the preferred node(s), and fallback
to all nodes in system when first try fails.

Add a dedicated function alloc_pages_preferred_many() for it just like for
'interleave' policy, which will be used by 2 general memoory allocation
APIs: alloc_pages() and alloc_pages_vma()

Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20200630212517.308045-9-ben.widawsky@intel.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/1627970362-61305-3-git-send-email-feng.tang@intel.com
Suggested-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Originally-by: Ben Widawsky <ben.widawsky@intel.com>
Co-developed-by: Ben Widawsky <ben.widawsky@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Ben Widawsky <ben.widawsky@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Feng Tang <feng.tang@intel.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Andi Kleen <ak@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

b27abacc 02-Sep-2021 Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>

mm/mempolicy: add MPOL_PREFERRED_MANY for multiple preferred nodes

Patch series "Introduce multi-preference mempolicy", v7.

This patch series introduces the concept of the MPOL_PREFERRED_MANY
mempolicy. This mempolicy mode can be used with either the
set_mempolicy(2) or mbind(2) interfaces. Like the MPOL_PREFERRED
interface, it allows an application to set a preference for nodes which
will fulfil memory allocation requests. Unlike the MPOL_PREFERRED mode,
it takes a set of nodes. Like the MPOL_BIND interface, it works over a
set of nodes. Unlike MPOL_BIND, it will not cause a SIGSEGV or invoke the
OOM killer if those preferred nodes are not available.

Along with these patches are patches for libnuma, numactl, numademo, and
memhog. They still need some polish, but can be found here:
https://gitlab.com/bwidawsk/numactl/-/tree/prefer-many It allows new
usage: `numactl -P 0,3,4`

The goal of the new mode is to enable some use-cases when using tiered memory
usage models which I've lovingly named.

1a. The Hare - The interconnect is fast enough to meet bandwidth and
latency requirements allowing preference to be given to all nodes with
"fast" memory.
1b. The Indiscriminate Hare - An application knows it wants fast
memory (or perhaps slow memory), but doesn't care which node it runs
on. The application can prefer a set of nodes and then xpu bind to
the local node (cpu, accelerator, etc). This reverses the nodes are
chosen today where the kernel attempts to use local memory to the CPU
whenever possible. This will attempt to use the local accelerator to
the memory.
2. The Tortoise - The administrator (or the application itself) is
aware it only needs slow memory, and so can prefer that.

Much of this is almost achievable with the bind interface, but the bind
interface suffers from an inability to fallback to another set of nodes if
binding fails to all nodes in the nodemask.

Like MPOL_BIND a nodemask is given. Inherently this removes ordering from the
preference.

> /* Set first two nodes as preferred in an 8 node system. */
> const unsigned long nodes = 0x3
> set_mempolicy(MPOL_PREFER_MANY, &nodes, 8);

> /* Mimic interleave policy, but have fallback *.
> const unsigned long nodes = 0xaa
> set_mempolicy(MPOL_PREFER_MANY, &nodes, 8);

Some internal discussion took place around the interface. There are two
alternatives which we have discussed, plus one I stuck in:

1. Ordered list of nodes. Currently it's believed that the added
complexity is nod needed for expected usecases.
2. A flag for bind to allow falling back to other nodes. This
confuses the notion of binding and is less flexible than the current
solution.
3. Create flags or new modes that helps with some ordering. This
offers both a friendlier API as well as a solution for more customized
usage. It's unknown if it's worth the complexity to support this.
Here is sample code for how this might work:

> // Prefer specific nodes for some something wacky
> set_mempolicy(MPOL_PREFER_MANY, 0x17c, 1024);
>
> // Default
> set_mempolicy(MPOL_PREFER_MANY | MPOL_F_PREFER_ORDER_SOCKET, NULL, 0);
> // which is the same as
> set_mempolicy(MPOL_DEFAULT, NULL, 0);
>
> // The Hare
> set_mempolicy(MPOL_PREFER_MANY | MPOL_F_PREFER_ORDER_TYPE, NULL, 0);
>
> // The Tortoise
> set_mempolicy(MPOL_PREFER_MANY | MPOL_F_PREFER_ORDER_TYPE_REV, NULL, 0);
>
> // Prefer the fast memory of the first two sockets
> set_mempolicy(MPOL_PREFER_MANY | MPOL_F_PREFER_ORDER_TYPE, -1, 2);
>

This patch (of 5):

The NUMA APIs currently allow passing in a "preferred node" as a single
bit set in a nodemask. If more than one bit it set, bits after the first
are ignored.

This single node is generally OK for location-based NUMA where memory
being allocated will eventually be operated on by a single CPU. However,
in systems with multiple memory types, folks want to target a *type* of
memory instead of a location. For instance, someone might want some
high-bandwidth memory but do not care about the CPU next to which it is
allocated. Or, they want a cheap, high capacity allocation and want to
target all NUMA nodes which have persistent memory in volatile mode. In
both of these cases, the application wants to target a *set* of nodes, but
does not want strict MPOL_BIND behavior as that could lead to OOM killer
or SIGSEGV.

So add MPOL_PREFERRED_MANY policy to support the multiple preferred nodes
requirement. This is not a pie-in-the-sky dream for an API. This was a
response to a specific ask of more than one group at Intel. Specifically:

1. There are existing libraries that target memory types such as
https://github.com/memkind/memkind. These are known to suffer from
SIGSEGV's when memory is low on targeted memory "kinds" that span more
than one node. The MCDRAM on a Xeon Phi in "Cluster on Die" mode is an
example of this.

2. Volatile-use persistent memory users want to have a memory policy
which is targeted at either "cheap and slow" (PMEM) or "expensive and
fast" (DRAM). However, they do not want to experience allocation
failures when the targeted type is unavailable.

3. Allocate-then-run. Generally, we let the process scheduler decide
on which physical CPU to run a task. That location provides a default
allocation policy, and memory availability is not generally considered
when placing tasks. For situations where memory is valuable and
constrained, some users want to allocate memory first, *then* allocate
close compute resources to the allocation. This is the reverse of the
normal (CPU) model. Accelerators such as GPUs that operate on
core-mm-managed memory are interested in this model.

A check is added in sanitize_mpol_flags() to not permit 'prefer_many'
policy to be used for now, and will be removed in later patch after all
implementations for 'prefer_many' are ready, as suggested by Michal Hocko.

[mhocko@kernel.org: suggest to refine policy_node/policy_nodemask handling]

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/1627970362-61305-1-git-send-email-feng.tang@intel.com
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20200630212517.308045-4-ben.widawsky@intel.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/1627970362-61305-2-git-send-email-feng.tang@intel.com
Co-developed-by: Ben Widawsky <ben.widawsky@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Ben Widawsky <ben.widawsky@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Feng Tang <feng.tang@intel.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andi Kleen <ak@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>b
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

062db293 02-Sep-2021 Baolin Wang <baolin.wang@linux.alibaba.com>

mm/mempolicy: use readable NUMA_NO_NODE macro instead of magic number

The caller of mpol_misplaced() already use NUMA_NO_NODE to check whether
current page node is misplaced, thus using NUMA_NO_NODE in
mpol_misplaced() instead of magic number is more readable.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/1b77c0ce21183fa86f4db250b115cf5e27396528.1627558356.git.baolin.wang@linux.alibaba.com
Signed-off-by: Baolin Wang <baolin.wang@linux.alibaba.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

65d759c8 02-Sep-2021 Charan Teja Reddy <charante@codeaurora.org>

mm: compaction: support triggering of proactive compaction by user

The proactive compaction[1] gets triggered for every 500msec and run
compaction on the node for COMPACTION_HPAGE_ORDER (usually order-9) pages
based on the value set to sysctl.compaction_proactiveness. Triggering the
compaction for every 500msec in search of COMPACTION_HPAGE_ORDER pages is
not needed for all applications, especially on the embedded system
usecases which may have few MB's of RAM. Enabling the proactive
compaction in its state will endup in running almost always on such
systems.

Other side, proactive compaction can still be very much useful for getting
a set of higher order pages in some controllable manner(controlled by
using the sysctl.compaction_proactiveness). So, on systems where enabling
the proactive compaction always may proove not required, can trigger the
same from user space on write to its sysctl interface. As an example, say
app launcher decide to launch the memory heavy application which can be
launched fast if it gets more higher order pages thus launcher can prepare
the system in advance by triggering the proactive compaction from
userspace.

This triggering of proactive compaction is done on a write to
sysctl.compaction_proactiveness by user.

[1]https://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/torvalds/linux.git/commit?id=facdaa917c4d5a376d09d25865f5a863f906234a

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: tweak vm.rst, per Mike]

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/1627653207-12317-1-git-send-email-charante@codeaurora.org
Signed-off-by: Charan Teja Reddy <charante@codeaurora.org>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Rafael Aquini <aquini@redhat.com>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>
Cc: Luis Chamberlain <mcgrof@kernel.org>
Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Cc: Iurii Zaikin <yzaikin@google.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Cc: Nitin Gupta <nigupta@nvidia.com>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Khalid Aziz <khalid.aziz@oracle.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Vinayak Menon <vinmenon@codeaurora.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

e1e92bfa 02-Sep-2021 Charan Teja Reddy <charante@codeaurora.org>

mm: compaction: optimize proactive compaction deferrals

Vlastimil Babka figured out that when fragmentation score didn't go down
across the proactive compaction i.e. when no progress is made, next wake
up for proactive compaction is deferred for 1 << COMPACT_MAX_DEFER_SHIFT,
i.e. 64 times, with each wakeup interval of
HPAGE_FRAG_CHECK_INTERVAL_MSEC(=500). In each of this wakeup, it just
decrement 'proactive_defer' counter and goes sleep i.e. it is getting
woken to just decrement a counter.

The same deferral time can also achieved by simply doing the
HPAGE_FRAG_CHECK_INTERVAL_MSEC << COMPACT_MAX_DEFER_SHIFT thus unnecessary
wakeup of kcompact thread is avoided thus also removes the need of
'proactive_defer' thread counter.

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: tweak comment]

Link: https://lore.kernel.org/linux-fsdevel/88abfdb6-2c13-b5a6-5b46-742d12d1c910@suse.cz/
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/1626869599-25412-1-git-send-email-charante@codeaurora.org
Signed-off-by: Charan Teja Reddy <charante@codeaurora.org>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Reviewed-by: Khalid Aziz <khalid.aziz@oracle.com>
Acked-by: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Nitin Gupta <nigupta@nvidia.com>
Cc: Vinayak Menon <vinmenon@codeaurora.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

1399af7e 02-Sep-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm, vmscan: guarantee drop_slab_node() termination

drop_slab_node() is called as part of echo 2>/proc/sys/vm/drop_caches
operation. It iterates over all memcgs and calls shrink_slab() which in
turn iterates over all slab shrinkers. Freed objects are counted and as
long as the total number of freed objects from all memcgs and shrinkers is
higher than 10, drop_slab_node() loops for another full memcgs*shrinkers
iteration.

This arbitrary constant threshold of 10 can result in effectively an
infinite loop on a system with large number of memcgs and/or parallel
activity that allocates new objects. This has been reported previously by
Chunxin Zang [1] and recently by our customer.

The previous report [1] has resulted in commit 069c411de40a ("mm/vmscan:
fix infinite loop in drop_slab_node") which added a check for signals
allowing the user to terminate the command writing to drop_caches. At the
time it was also considered to make the threshold grow with each iteration
to guarantee termination, but such patch hasn't been formally proposed
yet.

This patch implements the dynamically growing threshold. At first
iteration it's enough to free one object to continue, and this threshold
effectively doubles with each iteration. Our customer's feedback was
positive.

There is always a risk that this change will result on some system in a
previously terminating drop_caches operation to terminate sooner and free
fewer objects. Ideally the semantics would guarantee freeing all freeable
objects that existed at the moment of starting the operation, while not
looping forever for newly allocated objects, but that's not feasible to
track. In the less ideal solution based on thresholds, arguably the
termination guarantee is more important than the exhaustiveness guarantee.
If there are reports of large regression wrt being exhaustive, we can
tune how fast the threshold grows.

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20200909152047.27905-1-zangchunxin@bytedance.com/T/#u

[vbabka@suse.cz: avoid undefined shift behaviour]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/2f034e6f-a753-550a-f374-e4e23899d3d5@suse.cz

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210818152239.25502-1-vbabka@suse.cz
Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Reported-by: Chunxin Zang <zangchunxin@bytedance.com>
Cc: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Cc: Chris Down <chris@chrisdown.name>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Kefeng Wang <wangkefeng.wang@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

2e786d9e 02-Sep-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/vmscan: add 'else' to remove check_pending label

We could add 'else' to remove the somewhat odd check_pending label to make
code core succinct.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210717065911.61497-5-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Alex Shi <alexs@kernel.org>
Cc: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hillf.zj@alibaba-inc.com>
Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@fb.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Yu Zhao <yuzhao@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

b87c517a 02-Sep-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/vmscan: remove unneeded return value of kswapd_run()

The return value of kswapd_run() is unused now. Clean it up.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210717065911.61497-4-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Alex Shi <alexs@kernel.org>
Cc: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hillf.zj@alibaba-inc.com>
Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@fb.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Yu Zhao <yuzhao@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

eaad1ae7 02-Sep-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/vmscan: remove misleading setting to sc->priority

The priority field of sc is used to control how many pages we should scan
at once while we always traverse the list to shrink the pages in these
functions. So these settings are unneeded and misleading.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210717065911.61497-3-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Alex Shi <alexs@kernel.org>
Cc: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hillf.zj@alibaba-inc.com>
Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@fb.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Yu Zhao <yuzhao@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

d17be2d9 02-Sep-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/vmscan: remove the PageDirty check after MADV_FREE pages are page_ref_freezed

Patch series "Cleanups for vmscan", v2.

This series contains cleanups to remove unneeded return value, misleading
setting and so on. Also this remove the PageDirty check after MADV_FREE
pages are page_ref_freezed. More details can be found in the respective
changelogs.

This patch (of 4):

If the MADV_FREE pages are redirtied before they could be reclaimed, put
the pages back to anonymous LRU list by setting SwapBacked flag and the
pages will be reclaimed in normal swapout way. But as Yu Zhao pointed
out, "The page has only one reference left, which is from the isolation.
After the caller puts the page back on lru and drops the reference, the
page will be freed anyway. It doesn't matter which lru it goes." So we
don't bother checking PageDirty here.

[Yu Zhao's comment is also quoted in the code.]

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210717065911.61497-1-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210717065911.61497-2-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: Yu Zhao <yuzhao@google.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Alex Shi <alexs@kernel.org>
Cc: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@fb.com>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hillf.zj@alibaba-inc.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

9647875b 02-Sep-2021 Hui Su <suhui@zeku.com>

mm/vmpressure: replace vmpressure_to_css() with vmpressure_to_memcg()

We can get memcg directly form vmpr instead of vmpr->memcg->css->memcg, so
add a new func helper vmpressure_to_memcg(). And no code will use
vmpressure_to_css(), so delete it.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210630112146.455103-1-suhui@zeku.com
Signed-off-by: Hui Su <suhui@zeku.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Acked-by: Chris Down <chris@chrisdown.name>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Vladimir Davydov <vdavydov.dev@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

20b51af1 02-Sep-2021 Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>

mm/migrate: add sysfs interface to enable reclaim migration

Some method is obviously needed to enable reclaim-based migration.

Just like traditional autonuma, there will be some workloads that will
benefit like workloads with more "static" configurations where hot pages
stay hot and cold pages stay cold. If pages come and go from the hot and
cold sets, the benefits of this approach will be more limited.

The benefits are truly workload-based and *not* hardware-based. We do not
believe that there is a viable threshold where certain hardware
configurations should have this mechanism enabled while others do not.

To be conservative, earlier work defaulted to disable reclaim- based
migration and did not include a mechanism to enable it. This proposes add
a new sysfs file

/sys/kernel/mm/numa/demotion_enabled

as a method to enable it.

We are open to any alternative that allows end users to enable this
mechanism or disable it if workload harm is detected (just like
traditional autonuma).

Once this is enabled page demotion may move data to a NUMA node that does
not fall into the cpuset of the allocating process. This could be
construed to violate the guarantees of cpusets. However, since this is an
opt-in mechanism, the assumption is that anyone enabling it is content to
relax the guarantees.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210721063926.3024591-9-ying.huang@intel.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210715055145.195411-10-ying.huang@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>
Originally-by: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Wei Xu <weixugc@google.com>
Cc: Yang Shi <yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com>
Cc: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Greg Thelen <gthelen@google.com>
Cc: Keith Busch <kbusch@kernel.org>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

3a235693 02-Sep-2021 Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>

mm/vmscan: never demote for memcg reclaim

Global reclaim aims to reduce the amount of memory used on a given node or
set of nodes. Migrating pages to another node serves this purpose.

memcg reclaim is different. Its goal is to reduce the total memory
consumption of the entire memcg, across all nodes. Migration does not
assist memcg reclaim because it just moves page contents between nodes
rather than actually reducing memory consumption.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210715055145.195411-9-ying.huang@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: "Huang, Ying" <ying.huang@intel.com>
Suggested-by: Yang Shi <yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Wei Xu <weixugc@google.com>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Greg Thelen <gthelen@google.com>
Cc: Keith Busch <kbusch@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

a2a36488 02-Sep-2021 Keith Busch <kbusch@kernel.org>

mm/vmscan: Consider anonymous pages without swap

Reclaim anonymous pages if a migration path is available now that demotion
provides a non-swap recourse for reclaiming anon pages.

Note that this check is subtly different from the can_age_anon_pages()
checks. This mechanism checks whether a specific page in a specific
context can actually be reclaimed, given current swap space and cgroup
limits.

can_age_anon_pages() is a much simpler and more preliminary check which
just says whether there is a possibility of future reclaim.

[kbusch@kernel.org: v11]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210715055145.195411-8-ying.huang@intel.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210721063926.3024591-7-ying.huang@intel.com

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210715055145.195411-8-ying.huang@intel.com
Cc: Keith Busch <kbusch@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: "Huang, Ying" <ying.huang@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Wei Xu <weixugc@google.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Greg Thelen <gthelen@google.com>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Yang Shi <yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

2f368a9f 02-Sep-2021 Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>

mm/vmscan: add helper for querying ability to age anonymous pages

Anonymous pages are kept on their own LRU(s). These lists could
theoretically always be scanned and maintained. But, without swap, there
is currently nothing the kernel can *do* with the results of a scanned,
sorted LRU for anonymous pages.

A check for '!total_swap_pages' currently serves as a valid check as to
whether anonymous LRUs should be maintained. However, another method will
be added shortly: page demotion.

Abstract out the 'total_swap_pages' checks into a helper, give it a
logically significant name, and check for the possibility of page
demotion.

[dave.hansen@linux.intel.com: v11]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210715055145.195411-7-ying.huang@intel.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210721063926.3024591-6-ying.huang@intel.com

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210715055145.195411-7-ying.huang@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: "Huang, Ying" <ying.huang@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Greg Thelen <gthelen@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Wei Xu <weixugc@google.com>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Keith Busch <kbusch@kernel.org>
Cc: Yang Shi <yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

668e4147 02-Sep-2021 Yang Shi <yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com>

mm/vmscan: add page demotion counter

Account the number of demoted pages.

Add pgdemote_kswapd and pgdemote_direct VM counters showed in
/proc/vmstat.

[ daveh:
- __count_vm_events() a bit, and made them look at the THP
size directly rather than getting data from migrate_pages()
]

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210721063926.3024591-5-ying.huang@intel.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210715055145.195411-6-ying.huang@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com>
Signed-off-by: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: "Huang, Ying" <ying.huang@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Wei Xu <weixugc@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Greg Thelen <gthelen@google.com>
Cc: Keith Busch <kbusch@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

26aa2d19 02-Sep-2021 Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>

mm/migrate: demote pages during reclaim

This is mostly derived from a patch from Yang Shi:

https://lore.kernel.org/linux-mm/1560468577-101178-10-git-send-email-yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com/

Add code to the reclaim path (shrink_page_list()) to "demote" data to
another NUMA node instead of discarding the data. This always avoids the
cost of I/O needed to read the page back in and sometimes avoids the
writeout cost when the page is dirty.

A second pass through shrink_page_list() will be made if any demotions
fail. This essentially falls back to normal reclaim behavior in the case
that demotions fail. Previous versions of this patch may have simply
failed to reclaim pages which were eligible for demotion but were unable
to be demoted in practice.

For some cases, for example, MADV_PAGEOUT, the pages are always discarded
instead of demoted to follow the kernel API definition. Because
MADV_PAGEOUT is defined as freeing specified pages regardless in which
tier they are.

Note: This just adds the start of infrastructure for migration. It is
actually disabled next to the FIXME in migrate_demote_page_ok().

[dave.hansen@linux.intel.com: v11]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210715055145.195411-5-ying.huang@intel.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210721063926.3024591-4-ying.huang@intel.com

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210715055145.195411-5-ying.huang@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: "Huang, Ying" <ying.huang@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Wei Xu <weixugc@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Reviewed-by: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Greg Thelen <gthelen@google.com>
Cc: Keith Busch <kbusch@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

5ac95884 02-Sep-2021 Yang Shi <yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com>

mm/migrate: enable returning precise migrate_pages() success count

Under normal circumstances, migrate_pages() returns the number of pages
migrated. In error conditions, it returns an error code. When returning
an error code, there is no way to know how many pages were migrated or not
migrated.

Make migrate_pages() return how many pages are demoted successfully for
all cases, including when encountering errors. Page reclaim behavior will
depend on this in subsequent patches.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210721063926.3024591-3-ying.huang@intel.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210715055145.195411-4-ying.huang@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com>
Signed-off-by: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: "Huang, Ying" <ying.huang@intel.com>
Suggested-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de> [optional parameter]
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Wei Xu <weixugc@google.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Greg Thelen <gthelen@google.com>
Cc: Keith Busch <kbusch@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

884a6e5d 02-Sep-2021 Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>

mm/migrate: update node demotion order on hotplug events

Reclaim-based migration is attempting to optimize data placement in memory
based on the system topology. If the system changes, so must the
migration ordering.

The implementation is conceptually simple and entirely unoptimized. On
any memory or CPU hotplug events, assume that a node was added or removed
and recalculate all migration targets. This ensures that the
node_demotion[] array is always ready to be used in case the new reclaim
mode is enabled.

This recalculation is far from optimal, most glaringly that it does not
even attempt to figure out the hotplug event would have some *actual*
effect on the demotion order. But, given the expected paucity of hotplug
events, this should be fine.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210721063926.3024591-2-ying.huang@intel.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210715055145.195411-3-ying.huang@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: "Huang, Ying" <ying.huang@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Wei Xu <weixugc@google.com>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Greg Thelen <gthelen@google.com>
Cc: Keith Busch <kbusch@kernel.org>
Cc: Yang Shi <yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

79c28a41 02-Sep-2021 Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>

mm/numa: automatically generate node migration order

Patch series "Migrate Pages in lieu of discard", v11.

We're starting to see systems with more and more kinds of memory such as
Intel's implementation of persistent memory.

Let's say you have a system with some DRAM and some persistent memory.
Today, once DRAM fills up, reclaim will start and some of the DRAM
contents will be thrown out. Allocations will, at some point, start
falling over to the slower persistent memory.

That has two nasty properties. First, the newer allocations can end up in
the slower persistent memory. Second, reclaimed data in DRAM are just
discarded even if there are gobs of space in persistent memory that could
be used.

This patchset implements a solution to these problems. At the end of the
reclaim process in shrink_page_list() just before the last page refcount
is dropped, the page is migrated to persistent memory instead of being
dropped.

While I've talked about a DRAM/PMEM pairing, this approach would function
in any environment where memory tiers exist.

This is not perfect. It "strands" pages in slower memory and never brings
them back to fast DRAM. Huang Ying has follow-on work which repurposes
NUMA balancing to promote hot pages back to DRAM.

This is also all based on an upstream mechanism that allows persistent
memory to be onlined and used as if it were volatile:

http://lkml.kernel.org/r/20190124231441.37A4A305@viggo.jf.intel.com

With that, the DRAM and PMEM in each socket will be represented as 2
separate NUMA nodes, with the CPUs sit in the DRAM node. So the
general inter-NUMA demotion mechanism introduced in the patchset can
migrate the cold DRAM pages to the PMEM node.

We have tested the patchset with the postgresql and pgbench. On a
2-socket server machine with DRAM and PMEM, the kernel with the patchset
can improve the score of pgbench up to 22.1% compared with that of the
DRAM only + disk case. This comes from the reduced disk read throughput
(which reduces up to 70.8%).

== Open Issues ==

* Memory policies and cpusets that, for instance, restrict allocations
to DRAM can be demoted to PMEM whenever they opt in to this
new mechanism. A cgroup-level API to opt-in or opt-out of
these migrations will likely be required as a follow-on.
* Could be more aggressive about where anon LRU scanning occurs
since it no longer necessarily involves I/O. get_scan_count()
for instance says: "If we have no swap space, do not bother
scanning anon pages"

This patch (of 9):

Prepare for the kernel to auto-migrate pages to other memory nodes with a
node migration table. This allows creating single migration target for
each NUMA node to enable the kernel to do NUMA page migrations instead of
simply discarding colder pages. A node with no target is a "terminal
node", so reclaim acts normally there. The migration target does not
fundamentally _need_ to be a single node, but this implementation starts
there to limit complexity.

When memory fills up on a node, memory contents can be automatically
migrated to another node. The biggest problems are knowing when to
migrate and to where the migration should be targeted.

The most straightforward way to generate the "to where" list would be to
follow the page allocator fallback lists. Those lists already tell us if
memory is full where to look next. It would also be logical to move
memory in that order.

But, the allocator fallback lists have a fatal flaw: most nodes appear in
all the lists. This would potentially lead to migration cycles (A->B,
B->A, A->B, ...).

Instead of using the allocator fallback lists directly, keep a separate
node migration ordering. But, reuse the same data used to generate page
allocator fallback in the first place: find_next_best_node().

This means that the firmware data used to populate node distances
essentially dictates the ordering for now. It should also be
architecture-neutral since all NUMA architectures have a working
find_next_best_node().

RCU is used to allow lock-less read of node_demotion[] and prevent
demotion cycles been observed. If multiple reads of node_demotion[] are
performed, a single rcu_read_lock() must be held over all reads to ensure
no cycles are observed. Details are as follows.

=== What does RCU provide? ===

Imagine a simple loop which walks down the demotion path looking
for the last node:

terminal_node = start_node;
while (node_demotion[terminal_node] != NUMA_NO_NODE) {
terminal_node = node_demotion[terminal_node];
}

The initial values are:

node_demotion[0] = 1;
node_demotion[1] = NUMA_NO_NODE;

and are updated to:

node_demotion[0] = NUMA_NO_NODE;
node_demotion[1] = 0;

What guarantees that the cycle is not observed:

node_demotion[0] = 1;
node_demotion[1] = 0;

and would loop forever?

With RCU, a rcu_read_lock/unlock() can be placed around the loop. Since
the write side does a synchronize_rcu(), the loop that observed the old
contents is known to be complete before the synchronize_rcu() has
completed.

RCU, combined with disable_all_migrate_targets(), ensures that the old
migration state is not visible by the time __set_migration_target_nodes()
is called.

=== What does READ_ONCE() provide? ===

READ_ONCE() forbids the compiler from merging or reordering successive
reads of node_demotion[]. This ensures that any updates are *eventually*
observed.

Consider the above loop again. The compiler could theoretically read the
entirety of node_demotion[] into local storage (registers) and never go
back to memory, and *permanently* observe bad values for node_demotion[].

Note: RCU does not provide any universal compiler-ordering
guarantees:

https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20150921204327.GH4029@linux.vnet.ibm.com/

This code is unused for now. It will be called later in the
series.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210721063926.3024591-1-ying.huang@intel.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210715055145.195411-1-ying.huang@intel.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210715055145.195411-2-ying.huang@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: "Huang, Ying" <ying.huang@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Wei Xu <weixugc@google.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Greg Thelen <gthelen@google.com>
Cc: Keith Busch <kbusch@kernel.org>
Cc: Yang Shi <yang.shi@linux.alibaba.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

a759a909 02-Sep-2021 Nadav Amit <namit@vmware.com>

userfaultfd: change mmap_changing to atomic

Patch series "userfaultfd: minor bug fixes".

Three unrelated bug fixes. The first two addresses possible issues (not
too theoretical ones), but I did not encounter them in practice.

The third patch addresses a test bug that causes the test to fail on my
system. It has been sent before as part of a bigger RFC.

This patch (of 3):

mmap_changing is currently a boolean variable, which is set and cleared
without any lock that protects against concurrent modifications.

mmap_changing is supposed to mark whether userfaultfd page-faults handling
should be retried since mappings are undergoing a change. However,
concurrent calls, for instance to madvise(MADV_DONTNEED), might cause
mmap_changing to be false, although the remove event was still not read
(hence acknowledged) by the user.

Change mmap_changing to atomic_t and increase/decrease appropriately. Add
a debug assertion to see whether mmap_changing is negative.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210808020724.1022515-1-namit@vmware.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210808020724.1022515-2-namit@vmware.com
Fixes: df2cc96e77011 ("userfaultfd: prevent non-cooperative events vs mcopy_atomic races")
Signed-off-by: Nadav Amit <namit@vmware.com>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Axel Rasmussen <axelrasmussen@google.com>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

09a26e83 02-Sep-2021 Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>

hugetlb: fix hugetlb cgroup refcounting during vma split

Guillaume Morin reported hitting the following WARNING followed by GPF or
NULL pointer deference either in cgroups_destroy or in the kill_css path.:

percpu ref (css_release) <= 0 (-1) after switching to atomic
WARNING: CPU: 23 PID: 130 at lib/percpu-refcount.c:196 percpu_ref_switch_to_atomic_rcu+0x127/0x130
CPU: 23 PID: 130 Comm: ksoftirqd/23 Kdump: loaded Tainted: G O 5.10.60 #1
RIP: 0010:percpu_ref_switch_to_atomic_rcu+0x127/0x130
Call Trace:
rcu_core+0x30f/0x530
rcu_core_si+0xe/0x10
__do_softirq+0x103/0x2a2
run_ksoftirqd+0x2b/0x40
smpboot_thread_fn+0x11a/0x170
kthread+0x10a/0x140
ret_from_fork+0x22/0x30

Upon further examination, it was discovered that the css structure was
associated with hugetlb reservations.

For private hugetlb mappings the vma points to a reserve map that
contains a pointer to the css. At mmap time, reservations are set up
and a reference to the css is taken. This reference is dropped in the
vma close operation; hugetlb_vm_op_close. However, if a vma is split no
additional reference to the css is taken yet hugetlb_vm_op_close will be
called twice for the split vma resulting in an underflow.

Fix by taking another reference in hugetlb_vm_op_open. Note that the
reference is only taken for the owner of the reserve map. In the more
common fork case, the pointer to the reserve map is cleared for
non-owning vmas.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210830215015.155224-1-mike.kravetz@oracle.com
Fixes: e9fe92ae0cd2 ("hugetlb_cgroup: add reservation accounting for private mappings")
Signed-off-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Reported-by: Guillaume Morin <guillaume@morinfr.org>
Suggested-by: Guillaume Morin <guillaume@morinfr.org>
Tested-by: Guillaume Morin <guillaume@morinfr.org>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

e32d20c0 02-Sep-2021 Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>

hugetlb: before freeing hugetlb page set dtor to appropriate value

When removing a hugetlb page from the pool the ref count is set to one (as
the free page has no ref count) and compound page destructor is set to
NULL_COMPOUND_DTOR. Since a subsequent call to free the hugetlb page will
call __free_pages for non-gigantic pages and free_gigantic_page for
gigantic pages the destructor is not used.

However, consider the following race with code taking a speculative
reference on the page:

Thread 0 Thread 1
-------- --------
remove_hugetlb_page
set_page_refcounted(page);
set_compound_page_dtor(page,
NULL_COMPOUND_DTOR);
get_page_unless_zero(page)
__update_and_free_page
__free_pages(page,
huge_page_order(h));

/* Note that __free_pages() will simply drop
the reference to the page. */

put_page(page)
__put_compound_page()
destroy_compound_page
NULL_COMPOUND_DTOR
BUG: kernel NULL pointer
dereference, address:
0000000000000000

To address this race, set the dtor to the normal compound page dtor for
non-gigantic pages. The dtor for gigantic pages does not matter as
gigantic pages are changed from a compound page to 'just a group of pages'
before freeing. Hence, the destructor is not used.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210809184832.18342-4-mike.kravetz@oracle.com
Signed-off-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Reviewed-by: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@linux.dev>
Cc: Mina Almasry <almasrymina@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

b65a4eda 02-Sep-2021 Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>

hugetlb: drop ref count earlier after page allocation

When discussing the possibility of inflated page ref counts, Muuchun Song
pointed out this potential issue [1]. It is true that any code could
potentially take a reference on a compound page after allocation and
before it is converted to and put into use as a hugetlb page.
Specifically, this could be done by any users of get_page_unless_zero.

There are three areas of concern within hugetlb code.

1) When adding pages to the pool. In this case, new pages are
allocated added to the pool by calling put_page to invoke the hugetlb
destructor (free_huge_page). If there is an inflated ref count on the
page, it will not be immediately added to the free list. It will only
be added to the free list when the temporary ref count is dropped.
This is deemed acceptable and will not be addressed.

2) A page is allocated for immediate use normally as a surplus page or
migration target. In this case, the user of the page will also hold a
reference. There is no issue as this is just like normal page ref
counting.

3) A page is allocated and MUST be added to the free list to satisfy a
reservation. One such example is gather_surplus_pages as pointed out
by Muchun in [1]. More specifically, this case covers callers of
enqueue_huge_page where the page reference count must be zero. This
patch covers this third case.

Three routines call enqueue_huge_page when the page reference count could
potentially be inflated. They are: gather_surplus_pages,
alloc_and_dissolve_huge_page and add_hugetlb_page.

add_hugetlb_page is called on error paths when a huge page can not be
freed due to the inability to allocate vmemmap pages. In this case, the
temporairly inflated ref count is not an issue. When the ref is dropped
the appropriate action will be taken. Instead of VM_BUG_ON if the ref
count does not drop to zero, simply return.

In gather_surplus_pages and alloc_and_dissolve_huge_page the caller
expects a page (or pages) to be put on the free lists. In this case we
must ensure there are no temporary ref counts. We do this by calling
put_page_testzero() earlier and not using pages without a zero ref count.
The temporary page flag (HPageTemporary) is used in such cases so that as
soon as the inflated ref count is dropped the page will be freed.

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-mm/CAMZfGtVMn3daKrJwZMaVOGOaJU+B4dS--x_oPmGQMD=c=QNGEg@mail.gmail.com/

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210809184832.18342-3-mike.kravetz@oracle.com
Signed-off-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Mina Almasry <almasrymina@google.com>
Cc: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Cc: Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@linux.dev>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

416d85ed 02-Sep-2021 Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>

hugetlb: simplify prep_compound_gigantic_page ref count racing code

Code in prep_compound_gigantic_page waits for a rcu grace period if it
notices a temporarily inflated ref count on a tail page. This was due to
the identified potential race with speculative page cache references which
could only last for a rcu grace period. This is overly complicated as
this situation is VERY unlikely to ever happen. Instead, just quickly
return an error.

Also, only print a warning in prep_compound_gigantic_page instead of
multiple callers.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210809184832.18342-2-mike.kravetz@oracle.com
Signed-off-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Mina Almasry <almasrymina@google.com>
Cc: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Cc: Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@linux.dev>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

f87060d3 02-Sep-2021 Michael Wang <yun.wang@linux.alibaba.com>

mm: fix panic caused by __page_handle_poison()

In commit 510d25c92ec4 ("mm/hwpoison: disable pcp for
page_handle_poison()"), __page_handle_poison() was introduced, and if we
mark:

RET_A = dissolve_free_huge_page();
RET_B = take_page_off_buddy();

then __page_handle_poison was supposed to return TRUE When RET_A == 0 &&
RET_B == TRUE

But since it failed to take care the case when RET_A is -EBUSY or -ENOMEM,
and just return the ret as a bool which actually become TRUE, it break the
original logic.

The following result is a huge page in freelist but was
referenced as poisoned, and lead into the final panic:

kernel BUG at mm/internal.h:95!
invalid opcode: 0000 [#1] SMP PTI
skip...
RIP: 0010:set_page_refcounted mm/internal.h:95 [inline]
RIP: 0010:remove_hugetlb_page+0x23c/0x240 mm/hugetlb.c:1371
skip...
Call Trace:
remove_pool_huge_page+0xe4/0x110 mm/hugetlb.c:1892
return_unused_surplus_pages+0x8d/0x150 mm/hugetlb.c:2272
hugetlb_acct_memory.part.91+0x524/0x690 mm/hugetlb.c:4017

This patch replaces 'bool' with 'int' to handle RET_A correctly.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/61782ac6-1e8a-4f6f-35e6-e94fce3b37f5@linux.alibaba.com
Fixes: 510d25c92ec4 ("mm/hwpoison: disable pcp for page_handle_poison()")
Signed-off-by: Michael Wang <yun.wang@linux.alibaba.com>
Acked-by: Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>
Reported-by: Abaci <abaci@linux.alibaba.com>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org> [5.14+]
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

941ca063 02-Sep-2021 Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>

mm: hwpoison: dump page for unhandlable page

Currently just very simple message is shown for unhandlable page, e.g.
non-LRU page, like: soft_offline: 0x1469f2: unknown non LRU page type
5ffff0000000000 ()

It is not very helpful for further debug, calling dump_page() could show
more useful information.

Calling dump_page() in get_any_page() in order to not duplicate the call
in a couple of different places. It may be called with pcp disabled and
holding memory hotplug lock, it should be not a big deal since hwpoison
handler is not called very often.

[shy828301@gmail.com: remove redundant pr_info per Noaya Horiguchi]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210824020946.195257-3-shy828301@gmail.com

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210819054116.266126-3-shy828301@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Suggested-by: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Acked-by: Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: David Mackey <tdmackey@twitter.com>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

d0505e9f 02-Sep-2021 Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>

mm: hwpoison: don't drop slab caches for offlining non-LRU page

In the current implementation of soft offline, if non-LRU page is met,
all the slab caches will be dropped to free the page then offline. But
if the page is not slab page all the effort is wasted in vain. Even
though it is a slab page, it is not guaranteed the page could be freed
at all.

However the side effect and cost is quite high. It does not only drop
the slab caches, but also may drop a significant amount of page caches
which are associated with inode caches. It could make the most
workingset gone in order to just offline a page. And the offline is not
guaranteed to succeed at all, actually I really doubt the success rate
for real life workload.

Furthermore the worse consequence is the system may be locked up and
unusable since the page cache release may incur huge amount of works
queued for memcg release.

Actually we ran into such unpleasant case in our production environment.
Firstly, the workqueue of memory_failure_work_func is locked up as
below:

BUG: workqueue lockup - pool cpus=1 node=0 flags=0x0 nice=0 stuck for 53s!
Showing busy workqueues and worker pools:
workqueue events: flags=0x0
pwq 2: cpus=1 node=0 flags=0x0 nice=0 active=14/256 refcnt=15
in-flight: 409271:memory_failure_work_func
pending: kfree_rcu_work, kfree_rcu_monitor, kfree_rcu_work, rht_deferred_worker, rht_deferred_worker, rht_deferred_worker, rht_deferred_worker, kfree_rcu_work, kfree_rcu_work, kfree_rcu_work, kfree_rcu_work, drain_local_stock, kfree_rcu_work
workqueue mm_percpu_wq: flags=0x8
pwq 2: cpus=1 node=0 flags=0x0 nice=0 active=1/256 refcnt=2
pending: vmstat_update
workqueue cgroup_destroy: flags=0x0
pwq 2: cpus=1 node=0 flags=0x0 nice=0 active=1/1 refcnt=12072
pending: css_release_work_fn

There were over 12K css_release_work_fn queued, and this caused a few
lockups due to the contention of worker pool lock with IRQ disabled, for
example:

NMI watchdog: Watchdog detected hard LOCKUP on cpu 1
Modules linked in: amd64_edac_mod edac_mce_amd crct10dif_pclmul crc32_pclmul ghash_clmulni_intel xt_DSCP iptable_mangle kvm_amd bpfilter vfat fat acpi_ipmi i2c_piix4 usb_storage ipmi_si k10temp i2c_core ipmi_devintf ipmi_msghandler acpi_cpufreq sch_fq_codel xfs libcrc32c crc32c_intel mlx5_core mlxfw nvme xhci_pci ptp nvme_core pps_core xhci_hcd
CPU: 1 PID: 205500 Comm: kworker/1:0 Tainted: G L 5.10.32-t1.el7.twitter.x86_64 #1
Hardware name: TYAN F5AMT /z /S8026GM2NRE-CGN, BIOS V8.030 03/30/2021
Workqueue: events memory_failure_work_func
RIP: 0010:queued_spin_lock_slowpath+0x41/0x1a0
Code: 41 f0 0f ba 2f 08 0f 92 c0 0f b6 c0 c1 e0 08 89 c2 8b 07 30 e4 09 d0 a9 00 01 ff ff 75 1b 85 c0 74 0e 8b 07 84 c0 74 08 f3 90 <8b> 07 84 c0 75 f8 b8 01 00 00 00 66 89 07 c3 f6 c4 01 75 04 c6 47
RSP: 0018:ffff9b2ac278f900 EFLAGS: 00000002
RAX: 0000000000480101 RBX: ffff8ce98ce71800 RCX: 0000000000000084
RDX: 0000000000000000 RSI: 0000000000000000 RDI: ffff8ce98ce6a140
RBP: 00000000000284c8 R08: ffffd7248dcb6808 R09: 0000000000000000
R10: 0000000000000003 R11: ffff9b2ac278f9b0 R12: 0000000000000001
R13: ffff8cb44dab9c00 R14: ffffffffbd1ce6a0 R15: ffff8cacaa37f068
FS: 0000000000000000(0000) GS:ffff8ce98ce40000(0000) knlGS:0000000000000000
CS: 0010 DS: 0000 ES: 0000 CR0: 0000000080050033
CR2: 00007fcf6e8cb000 CR3: 0000000a0c60a000 CR4: 0000000000350ee0
Call Trace:
__queue_work+0xd6/0x3c0
queue_work_on+0x1c/0x30
uncharge_batch+0x10e/0x110
mem_cgroup_uncharge_list+0x6d/0x80
release_pages+0x37f/0x3f0
__pagevec_release+0x1c/0x50
__invalidate_mapping_pages+0x348/0x380
inode_lru_isolate+0x10a/0x160
__list_lru_walk_one+0x7b/0x170
list_lru_walk_one+0x4a/0x60
prune_icache_sb+0x37/0x50
super_cache_scan+0x123/0x1a0
do_shrink_slab+0x10c/0x2c0
shrink_slab+0x1f1/0x290
drop_slab_node+0x4d/0x70
soft_offline_page+0x1ac/0x5b0
memory_failure_work_func+0x6a/0x90
process_one_work+0x19e/0x340
worker_thread+0x30/0x360
kthread+0x116/0x130

The lockup made the machine is quite unusable. And it also made the
most workingset gone, the reclaimabled slab caches were reduced from 12G
to 300MB, the page caches were decreased from 17G to 4G.

But the most disappointing thing is all the effort doesn't make the page
offline, it just returns:

soft_offline: 0x1469f2: unknown non LRU page type 5ffff0000000000 ()

It seems the aggressive behavior for non-LRU page didn't pay back, so it
doesn't make too much sense to keep it considering the terrible side
effect.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210819054116.266126-1-shy828301@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Reported-by: David Mackey <tdmackey@twitter.com>
Acked-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

a21c184f 02-Sep-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/hwpoison: fix some obsolete comments

Since commit cb731d6c62bb ("vmscan: per memory cgroup slab shrinkers"),
shrink_node_slabs is renamed to drop_slab_node. And doit argument is
changed to forcekill since commit 6751ed65dc66 ("x86/mce: Fix
siginfo_t->si_addr value for non-recoverable memory faults").

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210814105131.48814-5-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Acked-by: Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

ed8c2f49 02-Sep-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/hwpoison: change argument struct page **hpagep to *hpage

It's unnecessary to pass in a struct page **hpagep because it's never
modified. Changing to use *hpage to simplify the code.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210814105131.48814-4-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Acked-by: Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

ea3732f7 02-Sep-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/hwpoison: fix potential pte_unmap_unlock pte error

If the first pte is equal to poisoned_pfn, i.e. check_hwpoisoned_entry()
return 1, the wrong ptep - 1 would be passed to pte_unmap_unlock().

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210814105131.48814-3-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Fixes: ad9c59c24095 ("mm,hwpoison: send SIGBUS with error virutal address")
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Acked-by: Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

ae611d07 02-Sep-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/hwpoison: remove unneeded variable unmap_success

Patch series "Cleanups and fixup for hwpoison"

This series contains cleanups to remove unneeded variable, fix some
obsolete comments and so on. Also we fix potential pte_unmap_unlock on
wrong pte. More details can be found in the respective changelogs.

This patch (of 4):

unmap_success is used to indicate whether page is successfully unmapped
but it's irrelated with ZONE_DEVICE page and unmap_success is always true
here. Remove this unneeded one.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210814105131.48814-1-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210814105131.48814-2-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Acked-by: Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

1d09510b 02-Sep-2021 George G. Davis <davis.george@siemens.com>

mm/page_isolation: tracing: trace all test_pages_isolated failures

Some test_pages_isolated failure conditions don't include trace points.
For debugging issues caused by "pinned" pages, make sure to trace all
calls whether they succeed or fail. In this case, a failure case did not
result in a trace point. So add the missing failure case in
test_pages_isolated traces.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210823202823.13765-1-george_davis@mentor.com
Signed-off-by: George G. Davis <davis.george@siemens.com>
Cc: Eugeniu Rosca <erosca@de.adit-jv.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

88dc6f20 02-Sep-2021 Vasily Averin <vvs@virtuozzo.com>

mm/page_alloc.c: use in_task()

Obsoleted in_intrrupt() include task context with disabled BH, it's better
to use in_task() instead.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/877caa99-1994-5545-92d2-d0bb2e394182@virtuozzo.com
Signed-off-by: Vasily Averin <vvs@virtuozzo.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

3b446da6 02-Sep-2021 Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>

mm/page_alloc: make alloc_node_mem_map() __init rather than __ref

alloc_node_mem_map() is never only called from free_area_init_node() that
is an __init function.

Make the actual alloc_node_mem_map() also __init and its stub version
static inline.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210716064124.31865-1-rppt@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

b346075f 02-Sep-2021 Nico Pache <npache@redhat.com>

mm/page_alloc.c: fix 'zone_id' may be used uninitialized in this function warning

When compiling with -Werror, cc1 will warn that 'zone_id' may be used
uninitialized in this function warning.

Initialize the zone_id as 0.

Its safe to assume that if the code reaches this point it has at least one
numa node with memory, so no need for an assertion before
init_unavilable_range.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210716210336.1114114-1-npache@redhat.com
Fixes: 122e093c1734 ("mm/page_alloc: fix memory map initialization for descending nodes")
Signed-off-by: Nico Pache <npache@redhat.com>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

08678804 02-Sep-2021 Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>

memblock: stop poisoning raw allocations

Functions memblock_alloc_exact_nid_raw() and memblock_alloc_try_nid_raw()
are intended for early memory allocation without overhead of zeroing the
allocated memory. Since these functions were used to allocate the memory
map, they have ended up with addition of a call to page_init_poison() that
poisoned the allocated memory when CONFIG_PAGE_POISON was set.

Since the memory map is allocated using a dedicated memmep_alloc()
function that takes care of the poisoning, remove page poisoning from the
memblock_alloc_*_raw() functions.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210714123739.16493-5-rppt@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Michal Simek <monstr@monstr.eu>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

c803b3c8 02-Sep-2021 Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>

mm: introduce memmap_alloc() to unify memory map allocation

There are several places that allocate memory for the memory map:
alloc_node_mem_map() for FLATMEM, sparse_buffer_init() and
__populate_section_memmap() for SPARSEMEM.

The memory allocated in the FLATMEM case is zeroed and it is never
poisoned, regardless of CONFIG_PAGE_POISON setting.

The memory allocated in the SPARSEMEM cases is not zeroed and it is
implicitly poisoned inside memblock if CONFIG_PAGE_POISON is set.

Introduce memmap_alloc() wrapper for memblock allocators that will be used
for both FLATMEM and SPARSEMEM cases and will makei memory map zeroing and
poisoning consistent for different memory models.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210714123739.16493-4-rppt@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Michal Simek <monstr@monstr.eu>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

c3ab6baf 02-Sep-2021 Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>

mm/page_alloc: always initialize memory map for the holes

Patch series "mm: ensure consistency of memory map poisoning".

Currently memory map allocation for FLATMEM case does not poison the
struct pages regardless of CONFIG_PAGE_POISON setting.

This happens because allocation of the memory map for FLATMEM and SPARSMEM
use different memblock functions and those that are used for SPARSMEM case
(namely memblock_alloc_try_nid_raw() and memblock_alloc_exact_nid_raw())
implicitly poison the allocated memory.

Another side effect of this implicit poisoning is that early setup code
that uses the same functions to allocate memory burns cycles for the
memory poisoning even if it was not intended.

These patches introduce memmap_alloc() wrapper that ensure that the memory
map allocation is consistent for different memory models.

This patch (of 4):

Currently memory map for the holes is initialized only when SPARSEMEM
memory model is used. Yet, even with FLATMEM there could be holes in the
physical memory layout that have memory map entries.

For instance, the memory reserved using e820 API on i386 or
"reserved-memory" nodes in device tree would not appear in memblock.memory
and hence the struct pages for such holes will be skipped during memory
map initialization.

These struct pages will be zeroed because the memory map for FLATMEM
systems is allocated with memblock_alloc_node() that clears the allocated
memory. While zeroed struct pages do not cause immediate problems, the
correct behaviour is to initialize every page using __init_single_page().
Besides, enabling page poison for FLATMEM case will trigger
PF_POISONED_CHECK() unless the memory map is properly initialized.

Make sure init_unavailable_range() is called for both SPARSEMEM and
FLATMEM so that struct pages representing memory holes would appear as
PG_Reserved with any memory layout.

[rppt@kernel.org: fix microblaze]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/YQWW3RCE4eWBuMu/@kernel.org

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210714123739.16493-1-rppt@kernel.org
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210714123739.16493-2-rppt@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Acked-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Tested-by: Guenter Roeck <linux@roeck-us.net>
Cc: Michal Simek <monstr@monstr.eu>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

c9d1af2b 02-Sep-2021 Woody Lin <woodylin@google.com>

mm/kasan: move kasan.fault to mm/kasan/report.c

Move the boot parameter 'kasan.fault' from hw_tags.c to report.c, so it
can support all KASAN modes - generic, and both tag-based.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210713010536.3161822-1-woodylin@google.com
Signed-off-by: Woody Lin <woodylin@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrey Konovalov <andreyknvl@gmail.com>
Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <ryabinin.a.a@gmail.com>
Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com>
Cc: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

f181234a 02-Sep-2021 Chen Wandun <chenwandun@huawei.com>

mm/vmalloc: fix wrong behavior in vread

commit f608788cd2d6 ("mm/vmalloc: use rb_tree instead of list for vread()
lookups") use rb_tree instread of list to speed up lookup, but function
__find_vmap_area is try to find a vmap_area that include target address,
if target address is smaller than the leftmost node in vmap_area_root, it
will return NULL, then vread will read nothing. This behavior is
different from the primitive semantics.

The correct way is find the first vmap_are that bigger than target addr,
that is what function find_vmap_area_exceed_addr does.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210714015959.3204871-1-chenwandun@huawei.com
Fixes: f608788cd2d6 ("mm/vmalloc: use rb_tree instead of list for vread() lookups")
Signed-off-by: Chen Wandun <chenwandun@huawei.com>
Reported-by: Hulk Robot <hulkci@huawei.com>
Cc: Serapheim Dimitropoulos <serapheim.dimitro@delphix.com>
Cc: Uladzislau Rezki (Sony) <urezki@gmail.com>
Cc: Kefeng Wang <wangkefeng.wang@huawei.com>
Cc: Wei Yongjun <weiyongjun1@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

12e376a6 02-Sep-2021 Uladzislau Rezki (Sony) <urezki@gmail.com>

mm/vmalloc: remove gfpflags_allow_blocking() check

Get rid of gfpflags_allow_blocking() check from the vmalloc() path as it
is supposed to be sleepable anyway. Thus remove it from the
alloc_vmap_area() as well as from the vm_area_alloc_pages().

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210707182639.31282-2-urezki@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Uladzislau Rezki (Sony) <urezki@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hdanton@sina.com>
Cc: Oleksiy Avramchenko <oleksiy.avramchenko@sonymobile.com>
Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

343ab817 02-Sep-2021 Uladzislau Rezki (Sony) <urezki@gmail.com>

mm/vmalloc: use batched page requests in bulk-allocator

In case of simultaneous vmalloc allocations, for example it is 1GB and 12
CPUs my system is able to hit "BUG: soft lockup" for !CONFIG_PREEMPT
kernel.

RIP: 0010:__alloc_pages_bulk+0xa9f/0xbb0
Call Trace:
__vmalloc_node_range+0x11c/0x2d0
__vmalloc_node+0x4b/0x70
fix_size_alloc_test+0x44/0x60 [test_vmalloc]
test_func+0xe7/0x1f0 [test_vmalloc]
kthread+0x11a/0x140
ret_from_fork+0x22/0x30

To address this issue invoke a bulk-allocator many times until all pages
are obtained, i.e. do batched page requests adding cond_resched()
meanwhile to reschedule. Batched value is hard-coded and is 100 pages per
call.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210707182639.31282-1-urezki@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Uladzislau Rezki (Sony) <urezki@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hdanton@sina.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: Oleksiy Avramchenko <oleksiy.avramchenko@sonymobile.com>
Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

bdbda735 02-Sep-2021 Miles Chen <miles.chen@mediatek.com>

mm/sparse: clarify pgdat_to_phys

Clarify pgdat_to_phys() by testing if
pgdat == &contig_page_data when CONFIG_NUMA=n.

We only expect contig_page_data in such case, so we
use &contig_page_data directly instead of pgdat.

No functional change intended when CONFIG_BUG_VM=n.

Comment from Mark [1]:
"
... and I reckon it'd be clearer and more robust to define
pgdat_to_phys() in the same ifdefs as contig_page_data so
that these, stay in-sync. e.g. have:

| #ifdef CONFIG_NUMA
| #define pgdat_to_phys(x) virt_to_phys(x)
| #else /* CONFIG_NUMA */
|
| extern struct pglist_data contig_page_data;
| ...
| #define pgdat_to_phys(x) __pa_symbol(&contig_page_data)
|
| #endif /* CONIFIG_NUMA */
"

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-arm-kernel/20210615131902.GB47121@C02TD0UTHF1T.local/

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210723123342.26406-1-miles.chen@mediatek.com
Signed-off-by: Miles Chen <miles.chen@mediatek.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Mark Rutland <mark.rutland@arm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

e0dbb2bc 02-Sep-2021 Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>

include/linux/mmzone.h: avoid a warning in sparse memory support

cppcheck warns that we're possibly losing information by shifting an int.
It's a false positive, because we don't allow for a NUMA node ID that
large, but if we ever change SECTION_NID_SHIFT, it could become a problem,
and in any case this is usually a legitimate warning. Fix it by adding
the necessary cast, which makes the compiler generate the right code.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/YOya+aBZFFmC476e@casper.infradead.org
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/202107130348.6LsVT9Nc-lkp@intel.com
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

11e02d37 02-Sep-2021 Ohhoon Kwon <ohoono.kwon@samsung.com>

mm: sparse: remove __section_nr() function

As the last users of __section_nr() are gone, let's remove unused function
__section_nr().

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210707150212.855-4-ohoono.kwon@samsung.com
Signed-off-by: Ohhoon Kwon <ohoono.kwon@samsung.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Acked-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Baoquan He <bhe@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

a1bc561b 02-Sep-2021 Ohhoon Kwon <ohoono.kwon@samsung.com>

mm: sparse: pass section_nr to section_mark_present

Patch series "mm: sparse: remove __section_nr() function", v4.

This patch (of 3):

With CONFIG_SPARSEMEM_EXTREME enabled, __section_nr() which converts
mem_section to section_nr could be costly since it iterates all section
roots to check if the given mem_section is in its range.

Since both callers of section_mark_present already know section_nr, let's
also pass section_nr as well as mem_section in order to reduce costly
translation.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210707150212.855-1-ohoono.kwon@samsung.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210707150212.855-2-ohoono.kwon@samsung.com
Signed-off-by: Ohhoon Kwon <ohoono.kwon@samsung.com>
Acked-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Baoquan He <bhe@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

cdcfc631 02-Sep-2021 Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>

mm/bootmem_info.c: mark __init on register_page_bootmem_info_section

register_page_bootmem_info_section() is only called from __init functions,
so mark it __init as well.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210817042221.77172-1-songmuchun@bytedance.com
Signed-off-by: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

5e22928a 02-Sep-2021 Chen Wandun <chenwandun@huawei.com>

mm/mremap: fix memory account on do_munmap() failure

mremap will account the delta between new_len and old_len in
vma_to_resize, and then call move_vma when expanding an existing memory
mapping. In function move_vma, there are two scenarios when calling
do_munmap:

1. move_page_tables from old_addr to new_addr success
2. move_page_tables from old_addr to new_addr fail

In first scenario, it should account old_len if do_munmap fail, because
the delta has already been accounted.

In second scenario, new_addr/new_len will assign to old_addr/old_len if
move_page_table fail, so do_munmap is try to unmap new_addr actually, if
do_munmap fail, it should account the new_len, because error code will be
return from move_vma, and delta will be unaccounted. What'more, because
of new_len == old_len, so account old_len also is OK.

In summary, account old_len will be correct if do_munmap fail.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210717101942.120607-1-chenwandun@huawei.com
Fixes: 51df7bcb6151 ("mm/mremap: account memory on do_munmap() failure")
Signed-off-by: Chen Wandun <chenwandun@huawei.com>
Acked-by: Dmitry Safonov <dima@arista.com>
Cc: Kefeng Wang <wangkefeng.wang@huawei.com>
Cc: Wei Yongjun <weiyongjun1@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

9b593cb2 02-Sep-2021 Liam R. Howlett <Liam.Howlett@Oracle.com>

remap_file_pages: Use vma_lookup() instead of find_vma()

Using vma_lookup() verifies the start address is contained in the found vma.
This results in easier to read code.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210817135234.1550204-1-Liam.Howlett@oracle.com
Signed-off-by: Liam R. Howlett <Liam.Howlett@Oracle.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

5b78ed24 02-Sep-2021 Luigi Rizzo <lrizzo@google.com>

mm/pagemap: add mmap_assert_locked() annotations to find_vma*()

find_vma() and variants need protection when used. This patch adds
mmap_assert_lock() calls in the functions.

To make sure the invariant is satisfied, we also need to add a
mmap_read_lock() around the get_user_pages_remote() call in
get_arg_page(). The lock is not strictly necessary because the mm has
been newly created, but the extra cost is limited because the same mutex
was also acquired shortly before in __bprm_mm_init(), so it is hot and
uncontended.

[penguin-kernel@i-love.sakura.ne.jp: TOMOYO needs the same protection which get_arg_page() needs]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/58bb6bf7-a57e-8a40-e74b-39584b415152@i-love.sakura.ne.jp

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210731175341.3458608-1-lrizzo@google.com
Signed-off-by: Luigi Rizzo <lrizzo@google.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

f00230ff 02-Sep-2021 Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>

mm,do_huge_pmd_numa_page: remove unnecessary TLB flushing code

Before commit c5b5a3dd2c1f ("mm: thp: refactor NUMA fault handling"), the
TLB flushing is done in do_huge_pmd_numa_page() itself via
flush_tlb_range().

But after commit c5b5a3dd2c1f ("mm: thp: refactor NUMA fault handling"),
the TLB flushing is done in migrate_pages() as in the following code path
anyway.

do_huge_pmd_numa_page
migrate_misplaced_page
migrate_pages

So now, the TLB flushing code in do_huge_pmd_numa_page() becomes
unnecessary. So the code is deleted in this patch to simplify the code.
This is only code cleanup, there's no visible performance difference.

The mmu_notifier_invalidate_range() in do_huge_pmd_numa_page() is
deleted too. Because migrate_pages() takes care of that too when CPU
TLB is flushed.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210720065529.716031-1-ying.huang@intel.com
Signed-off-by: "Huang, Ying" <ying.huang@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Cc: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Christian Borntraeger <borntraeger@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Gerald Schaefer <gerald.schaefer@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <hca@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Vasily Gorbik <gor@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Paolo Bonzini <pbonzini@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

4ba9515d 02-Sep-2021 Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>

memcg: make memcg->event_list_lock irqsafe

The memcg->event_list_lock is usually taken in the normal context but when
the userspace closes the corresponding eventfd, eventfd_release through
memcg_event_wake takes memcg->event_list_lock with interrupts disabled.
This is not an issue on its own but it creates a nested dependency from
eventfd_ctx->wqh.lock to memcg->event_list_lock.

Independently, for unrelated eventfd, eventfd_signal() can be called in
the irq context, thus making eventfd_ctx->wqh.lock an irq lock. For
example, FPGA DFL driver, VHOST VPDA driver and couple of VFIO drivers.
This will force memcg->event_list_lock to be an irqsafe lock as well.

One way to break the nested dependency between eventfd_ctx->wqh.lock and
memcg->event_list_lock is to add an indirection. However the simplest
solution would be to make memcg->event_list_lock irqsafe. This is cgroup
v1 feature, is in maintenance and may get deprecated in near future. So,
no need to add more code.

BTW this has been discussed previously [1] but there weren't irq users of
eventfd_signal() at the time.

[1] https://www.spinics.net/lists/cgroups/msg06248.html

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210830172953.207257-1-shakeelb@google.com
Signed-off-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

5c49cf9a 02-Sep-2021 Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>

memcg: fix up drain_local_stock comment

Thomas and Vlastimil have noticed that the comment in drain_local_stock
doesn't quite make sense. It talks about a synchronization with the
memory hotplug but there is no actual memory hotplug involvement here. I
meant to talk about cpu hotplug here. Fix that up and hopefuly make the
comment more helpful by referencing the cpu hotplug callback as well.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/YRDwOhVglJmY7ES5@dhcp22.suse.cz
Signed-off-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

27fb0956 02-Sep-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm, memcg: save some atomic ops when flush is already true

Add 'else' to save some atomic ops in obj_stock_flush_required() when
flush is already true. No functional change intended here.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210807082835.61281-3-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Acked-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Vladimir Davydov <vdavydov.dev@gmail.com>
Cc: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Alex Shi <alexs@kernel.org>
Cc: Wei Yang <richard.weiyang@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

37bc3cb9 02-Sep-2021 Baolin Wang <baolin.wang@linux.alibaba.com>

mm: memcontrol: set the correct memcg swappiness restriction

Since commit c843966c556d ("mm: allow swappiness that prefers reclaiming
anon over the file workingset") has expended the swappiness value to make
swap to be preferred in some systems. We should also change the memcg
swappiness restriction to allow memcg swap-preferred.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/d77469b90c45c49953ccbc51e54a1d465bc18f70.1627626255.git.baolin.wang@linux.alibaba.com
Fixes: c843966c556d ("mm: allow swappiness that prefers reclaiming anon over the file workingset")
Signed-off-by: Baolin Wang <baolin.wang@linux.alibaba.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Vladimir Davydov <vdavydov.dev@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

55a68c82 02-Sep-2021 Vasily Averin <vvs@virtuozzo.com>

memcg: replace in_interrupt() by !in_task() in active_memcg()

set_active_memcg() uses in_interrupt() check to select proper storage for
cgroup: pointer on task struct or per-cpu pointer.

It isn't fully correct: obsoleted in_interrupt() includes tasks with
disabled BH. It's better to use '!in_task()' instead.

Link: https://lkml.org/lkml/2021/7/26/487
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/ed4448b0-4970-616f-7368-ef9dd3cb628d@virtuozzo.com
Fixes: 37d5985c003d ("mm: kmem: prepare remote memcg charging infra for interrupt contexts")
Signed-off-by: Vasily Averin <vvs@virtuozzo.com>
Reviewed-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

aa48e47e 02-Sep-2021 Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>

memcg: infrastructure to flush memcg stats

At the moment memcg stats are read in four contexts:

1. memcg stat user interfaces
2. dirty throttling
3. page fault
4. memory reclaim

Currently the kernel flushes the stats for first two cases. Flushing the
stats for remaining two casese may have performance impact. Always
flushing the memcg stats on the page fault code path may negatively
impacts the performance of the applications. In addition flushing in the
memory reclaim code path, though treated as slowpath, can become the
source of contention for the global lock taken for stat flushing because
when system or memcg is under memory pressure, many tasks may enter the
reclaim path.

This patch uses following mechanisms to solve these challenges:

1. Periodically flush the stats from root memcg every 2 seconds. This
will time limit the out of sync stats.

2. Asynchronously flush the stats after fixed number of stat updates.
In the worst case the stat can be out of sync by O(nr_cpus * BATCH) for
2 seconds.

3. For avoiding thundering herd to flush the stats particularly from
the memory reclaim context, introduce memcg local spinlock and let only
one flusher active at a time. This could have been done through
cgroup_rstat_lock lock but that lock is used by other subsystem and for
userspace reading memcg stats. So, it is better to keep flushers
introduced by this patch decoupled from cgroup_rstat_lock. However we
would have to use irqsafe version of rstat flush but that is fine as
this code path will be flushing for whole tree and do the work for
everyone. No one will be waiting for that worker.

[shakeelb@google.com: fix sleep-in-wrong context bug]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210716212137.1391164-2-shakeelb@google.com

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210714013948.270662-2-shakeelb@google.com
Signed-off-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Tested-by: Marek Szyprowski <m.szyprowski@samsung.com>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hdanton@sina.com>
Cc: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Michal Koutný <mkoutny@suse.com>
Cc: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Cc: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

7e1c0d6f 02-Sep-2021 Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>

memcg: switch lruvec stats to rstat

The commit 2d146aa3aa84 ("mm: memcontrol: switch to rstat") switched memcg
stats to rstat infrastructure but skipped the conversion of the lruvec
stats as such stats are read in the performance critical code paths and
flushing stats may have impacted the performances of the applications.
This patch converts the lruvec stats to rstat and later patches add
mechanisms to keep the performance impact to minimum.

The rstat conversion comes with the price i.e. memory cost. Effectively
this patch reverts the savings done by the commit f3344adf38bd ("mm:
memcontrol: optimize per-lruvec stats counter memory usage"). However
this cost is justified due to negative impact of the inaccurate lruvec
stats on many heuristics. One such case is reported in [1].

The memory reclaim code is filled with plethora of heuristics and many of
those heuristics reads the lruvec stats. So, inaccurate stats can make
such heuristics ineffective. [1] reports the impact of inaccurate lruvec
stats on the "cache trim mode" heuristic. Inaccurate lruvec stats can
impact the deactivation and aging anon heuristics as well.

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-mm/20210311004449.1170308-1-ying.huang@intel.com/

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210716212137.1391164-1-shakeelb@google.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210714013948.270662-1-shakeelb@google.com
Signed-off-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hdanton@sina.com>
Cc: Michal Koutný <mkoutny@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

01c4b28c 02-Sep-2021 Suren Baghdasaryan <surenb@google.com>

mm, memcg: inline swap-related functions to improve disabled memcg config

Inline mem_cgroup_try_charge_swap, mem_cgroup_uncharge_swap and
cgroup_throttle_swaprate functions to perform mem_cgroup_disabled static
key check inline before calling the main body of the function. This
minimizes the memcg overhead in the pagefault and exit_mmap paths when
memcgs are disabled using cgroup_disable=memory command-line option. This
change results in ~1% overhead reduction when running PFT test [1]
comparing {CONFIG_MEMCG=n} against {CONFIG_MEMCG=y, cgroup_disable=memory}
configuration on an 8-core ARM64 Android device.

[1] https://lkml.org/lkml/2006/8/29/294 also used in mmtests suite

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210713010934.299876-3-surenb@google.com
Signed-off-by: Suren Baghdasaryan <surenb@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Acked-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Cc: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Cc: Alex Shi <alexs@kernel.org>
Cc: Wei Yang <richard.weiyang@gmail.com>
Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

2c8d8f97 02-Sep-2021 Suren Baghdasaryan <surenb@google.com>

mm, memcg: inline mem_cgroup_{charge/uncharge} to improve disabled memcg config

Inline mem_cgroup_{charge/uncharge} and mem_cgroup_uncharge_list functions
functions to perform mem_cgroup_disabled static key check inline before
calling the main body of the function. This minimizes the memcg overhead
in the pagefault and exit_mmap paths when memcgs are disabled using
cgroup_disable=memory command-line option.

This change results in ~0.4% overhead reduction when running PFT test [1]
comparing {CONFIG_MEMCG=n} against {CONFIG_MEMCG=y, cgroup_disable=memory}
configuration on an 8-core ARM64 Android device.

[1] https://lkml.org/lkml/2006/8/29/294 also used in mmtests suite

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210713010934.299876-2-surenb@google.com
Signed-off-by: Suren Baghdasaryan <surenb@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Acked-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Alex Shi <alexs@kernel.org>
Cc: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Cc: Wei Yang <richard.weiyang@gmail.com>
Cc: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

56cab285 02-Sep-2021 Suren Baghdasaryan <surenb@google.com>

mm, memcg: add mem_cgroup_disabled checks in vmpressure and swap-related functions

Add mem_cgroup_disabled check in vmpressure, mem_cgroup_uncharge_swap and
cgroup_throttle_swaprate functions. This minimizes the memcg overhead in
the pagefault and exit_mmap paths when memcgs are disabled using
cgroup_disable=memory command-line option.

This change results in ~2.1% overhead reduction when running PFT test [1]
comparing {CONFIG_MEMCG=n, CONFIG_MEMCG_SWAP=n} against {CONFIG_MEMCG=y,
CONFIG_MEMCG_SWAP=y, cgroup_disable=memory} configuration on an 8-core
ARM64 Android device.

[1] https://lkml.org/lkml/2006/8/29/294 also used in mmtests suite

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210713010934.299876-1-surenb@google.com
Signed-off-by: Suren Baghdasaryan <surenb@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Acked-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Alex Shi <alexs@kernel.org>
Cc: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Cc: Wei Yang <richard.weiyang@gmail.com>
Cc: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

1e6decf3 02-Sep-2021 Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>

shmem: shmem_writepage() split unlikely i915 THP

drivers/gpu/drm/i915/gem/i915_gem_shmem.c contains a shmem_writeback()
which calls shmem_writepage() from a shrinker: that usually works well
enough; but if /sys/kernel/mm/transparent_hugepage/shmem_enabled has been
set to "always" (intended to be usable) or "force" (forces huge everywhere
for easy testing), shmem_writepage() is surprised to be called with a huge
page, and crashes on the VM_BUG_ON_PAGE(PageCompound) (I did not find out
where the crash happens when CONFIG_DEBUG_VM is off).

LRU page reclaim always splits the shmem huge page first: I'd prefer not
to demand that of i915, so check and split compound in shmem_writepage().

Patch history: when first sent last year
http://lkml.kernel.org/r/alpine.LSU.2.11.2008301401390.5954@eggly.anvils
https://lore.kernel.org/linux-mm/20200919042009.bomzxmrg7%25akpm@linux-foundation.org/
Matthew Wilcox noticed that tail pages were wrongly left clean. This
version brackets the split with Set and Clear PageDirty as he suggested:
which works very well, even if it falls short of our aspirations. And
recently I realized that the crash is not limited to the testing option
"force", but affects "always" too: which is more important to fix.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/bac6158c-8b3d-4dca-cffc-4982f58d9794@google.com
Fixes: 2d6692e642e7 ("drm/i915: Start writeback from the shrinker")
Signed-off-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Acked-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

a7fddc36 02-Sep-2021 Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>

huge tmpfs: decide stat.st_blksize by shmem_is_huge()

4.18 commit 89fdcd262fd4 ("mm: shmem: make stat.st_blksize return huge
page size if THP is on") added is_huge_enabled() to decide st_blksize: if
hugeness is to be defined per file, that will need to be replaced by
shmem_is_huge().

This does give a different answer (No) for small files on a
"huge=within_size" mount: but that can be considered a minor bugfix. And
a different answer (No) for default files on a "huge=advise" mount: I'm
reluctant to complicate it, just to reproduce the same debatable answer as
before.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/af7fb3f9-4415-9e8e-fdac-b1a5253ad21@google.com
Signed-off-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

5e6e5a12 02-Sep-2021 Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>

huge tmpfs: shmem_is_huge(vma, inode, index)

Extend shmem_huge_enabled(vma) to shmem_is_huge(vma, inode, index), so
that a consistent set of checks can be applied, even when the inode is
accessed through read/write syscalls (with NULL vma) instead of mmaps (the
index argument is seldom of interest, but required by mount option
"huge=within_size"). Clean up and rearrange the checks a little.

This then replaces the checks which shmem_fault() and shmem_getpage_gfp()
were making, and eliminates the SGP_HUGE and SGP_NOHUGE modes.

Replace a couple of 0s by explicit SHMEM_HUGE_NEVERs; and replace the
obscure !shmem_mapping() symlink check by explicit S_ISLNK() - nothing
else needs that symlink check, so leave it there in shmem_getpage_gfp().

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/23a77889-2ddc-b030-75cd-44ca27fd4d1@google.com
Signed-off-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

acdd9f8e 02-Sep-2021 Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>

huge tmpfs: SGP_NOALLOC to stop collapse_file() on race

khugepaged's collapse_file() currently uses SGP_NOHUGE to tell
shmem_getpage() not to try allocating a huge page, in the very unlikely
event that a racing hole-punch removes the swapped or fallocated page as
soon as i_pages lock is dropped.

We want to consolidate shmem's huge decisions, removing SGP_HUGE and
SGP_NOHUGE; but cannot quite persuade ourselves that it's okay to regress
the protection in this case - Yang Shi points out that the huge page would
remain indefinitely, charged to root instead of the intended memcg.

collapse_file() should not even allocate a small page in this case: why
proceed if someone is punching a hole? SGP_READ is almost the right flag
here, except that it optimizes away from a fallocated page, with NULL to
tell caller to fill with zeroes (like a hole); whereas collapse_file()'s
sequence relies on using a cache page. Add SGP_NOALLOC just for this.

There are too many consecutive "if (page"s there in shmem_getpage_gfp():
group it better; and fix the outdated "bring it back from swap" comment.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/1355343b-acf-4653-ef79-6aee40214ac5@google.com
Signed-off-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

c852023e 02-Sep-2021 Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>

huge tmpfs: move shmem_huge_enabled() upwards

shmem_huge_enabled() is about to be enhanced into shmem_is_huge(), so that
it can be used more widely throughout: before making functional changes,
shift it to its final position (to avoid forward declaration).

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/16fec7b7-5c84-415a-8586-69d8bf6a6685@google.com
Signed-off-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

b9e2faaf 02-Sep-2021 Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>

huge tmpfs: revert shmem's use of transhuge_vma_enabled()

5.14 commit e6be37b2e7bd ("mm/huge_memory.c: add missing read-only THP
checking in transparent_hugepage_enabled()") added transhuge_vma_enabled()
as a wrapper for two very different checks (one check is whether the app
has marked its address range not to use THPs, the other check is whether
the app is running in a hierarchy that has been marked never to use THPs).
shmem_huge_enabled() prefers to show those two checks explicitly, as
before.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/45e5338-18d-c6f9-c17e-34f510bc1728@google.com
Signed-off-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

2b5bbcb1 02-Sep-2021 Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>

huge tmpfs: remove shrinklist addition from shmem_setattr()

There's a block of code in shmem_setattr() to add the inode to
shmem_unused_huge_shrink()'s shrinklist when lowering i_size: it dates
from before 5.7 changed truncation to do split_huge_page() for itself, and
should have been removed at that time.

I am over-stating that: split_huge_page() can fail (notably if there's an
extra reference to the page at that time), so there might be value in
retrying. But there were already retries as truncation worked through the
tails, and this addition risks repeating unsuccessful retries
indefinitely: I'd rather remove it now, and work on reducing the chance of
split_huge_page() failures separately, if we need to.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/b73b3492-8822-18f9-83e2-938528cdde94@google.com
Fixes: 71725ed10c40 ("mm: huge tmpfs: try to split_huge_page() when punching hole")
Signed-off-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

d144bf62 02-Sep-2021 Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>

huge tmpfs: fix split_huge_page() after FALLOC_FL_KEEP_SIZE

A successful shmem_fallocate() guarantees that the extent has been
reserved, even beyond i_size when the FALLOC_FL_KEEP_SIZE flag was used.
But that guarantee is broken by shmem_unused_huge_shrink()'s attempts to
split huge pages and free their excess beyond i_size; and by other uses of
split_huge_page() near i_size.

It's sad to add a shmem inode field just for this, but I did not find a
better way to keep the guarantee. A flag to say KEEP_SIZE has been used
would be cheaper, but I'm averse to unclearable flags. The fallocend
field is not perfect either (many disjoint ranges might be fallocated),
but good enough; and gains another use later on.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/ca9a146-3a59-6cd3-7f28-e9a044bb1052@google.com
Fixes: 779750d20b93 ("shmem: split huge pages beyond i_size under memory pressure")
Signed-off-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

050dcb5c 02-Sep-2021 Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>

huge tmpfs: fix fallocate(vanilla) advance over huge pages

Patch series "huge tmpfs: shmem_is_huge() fixes and cleanups".

A series of huge tmpfs fixes and cleanups.

This patch (of 9):

shmem_fallocate() goes to a lot of trouble to leave its newly allocated
pages !Uptodate, partly to identify and undo them on failure, partly to
leave the overhead of clearing them until later. But the huge page case
did not skip to the end of the extent, walked through the tail pages one
by one, and appeared to work just fine: but in doing so, cleared and
Uptodated the huge page, so there was no way to undo it on failure.

And by setting Uptodate too soon, it messed up both its nr_falloced and
nr_unswapped counts, so that the intended "time to give up" heuristic did
not work at all.

Now advance immediately to the end of the huge extent, with a comment on
why this is more than just an optimization. But although this speeds up
huge tmpfs fallocation, it does leave the clearing until first use, and
some users may have come to appreciate slow fallocate but fast first use:
if they complain, then we can consider adding a pass to clear at the end.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/da632211-8e3e-6b1-aee-ab24734429a0@google.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/16201bd2-70e-37e2-e89b-5f929430da@google.com
Fixes: 800d8c63b2e9 ("shmem: add huge pages support")
Signed-off-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

86a2f3f2 02-Sep-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

shmem: include header file to declare swap_info

It's bad to extern swap_info[] in .c. Include corresponding header file
instead.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210812120350.49801-5-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

cdd89d4c 02-Sep-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

shmem: remove unneeded function forward declaration

The forward declaration for shmem_should_replace_page() and
shmem_replace_page() is unnecessary. Remove them.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210812120350.49801-4-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

b6378fc8 02-Sep-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

shmem: remove unneeded header file

mfill_atomic_install_pte() is introduced to install pte and update mmu
cache since commit bf6ebd97aba0 ("userfaultfd/shmem: modify
shmem_mfill_atomic_pte to use install_pte()"). So we should remove
tlbflush.h as update_mmu_cache() is not called here now.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210812120350.49801-3-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

f2b346e4 02-Sep-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

shmem: remove unneeded variable ret

Patch series "Cleanups for shmem".

This series contains cleanups to remove unneeded variable, header file,
function forward declaration and so on. More details can be found in the
respective changelogs.

This patch (of 4):

The local variable ret is always equal to -ENOMEM and never touched. So
remove it and return -ENOMEM directly to simplify the code.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210812120350.49801-1-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210812120350.49801-2-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

bf11b9a8 02-Sep-2021 Sebastian Andrzej Siewior <bigeasy@linutronix.de>

shmem: use raw_spinlock_t for ->stat_lock

Each CPU has SHMEM_INO_BATCH inodes available in `->ino_batch' which is
per-CPU. Access here is serialized by disabling preemption. If the pool
is empty, it gets reloaded from `->next_ino'. Access here is serialized
by ->stat_lock which is a spinlock_t and can not be acquired with disabled
preemption.

One way around it would make per-CPU ino_batch struct containing the inode
number a local_lock_t.

Another solution is to promote ->stat_lock to a raw_spinlock_t. The
critical sections are short. The mpol_put() must be moved outside of the
critical section to avoid invoking the destructor with disabled
preemption.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210806142916.jdwkb5bx62q5fwfo@linutronix.de
Signed-off-by: Sebastian Andrzej Siewior <bigeasy@linutronix.de>
Acked-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

3969b1a6 02-Sep-2021 John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>

mm: delete unused get_kernel_page()

get_kernel_page() was added in 2012 by [1]. It was used for a while for
NFS, but then in 2014, a refactoring [2] removed all callers, and it has
apparently not been used since.

Remove get_kernel_page() because it has no callers.

[1] commit 18022c5d8627 ("mm: add get_kernel_page[s] for pinning of
kernel addresses for I/O")
[2] commit 91f79c43d1b5 ("new helper: iov_iter_get_pages_alloc()")

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210729221847.1165665-1-jhubbard@nvidia.com
Signed-off-by: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@redhat.com>
Cc: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Eric B Munson <emunson@mgebm.net>
Cc: Eric Paris <eparis@redhat.com>
Cc: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
Cc: Mike Christie <michaelc@cs.wisc.edu>
Cc: Neil Brown <neilb@suse.de>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <a.p.zijlstra@chello.nl>
Cc: Sebastian Andrzej Siewior <sebastian@breakpoint.cc>
Cc: Trond Myklebust <Trond.Myklebust@netapp.com>
Cc: Xiaotian Feng <dfeng@redhat.com>
Cc: Mark Salter <msalter@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

51cc3a66 02-Sep-2021 Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>

fs, mm: fix race in unlinking swapfile

We had a recurring situation in which admin procedures setting up
swapfiles would race with test preparation clearing away swapfiles; and
just occasionally that got stuck on a swapfile "(deleted)" which could
never be swapped off. That is not supposed to be possible.

2.6.28 commit f9454548e17c ("don't unlink an active swapfile") admitted
that it was leaving a race window open: now close it.

may_delete() makes the IS_SWAPFILE check (amongst many others) before
inode_lock has been taken on target: now repeat just that simple check in
vfs_unlink() and vfs_rename(), after taking inode_lock.

Which goes most of the way to fixing the race, but swapon() must also
check after it acquires inode_lock, that the file just opened has not
already been unlinked.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/e17b91ad-a578-9a15-5e3-4989e0f999b5@google.com
Fixes: f9454548e17c ("don't unlink an active swapfile")
Signed-off-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

9857a17f 02-Sep-2021 John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>

mm/gup: remove try_get_page(), call try_get_compound_head() directly

try_get_page() is very similar to try_get_compound_head(), and in fact
try_get_page() has fallen a little behind in terms of maintenance:
try_get_compound_head() handles speculative page references more
thoroughly.

There are only two try_get_page() callsites, so just call
try_get_compound_head() directly from those, and remove try_get_page()
entirely.

Also, seeing as how this changes try_get_compound_head() into a non-static
function, provide some kerneldoc documentation for it.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210813044133.1536842-4-jhubbard@nvidia.com
Signed-off-by: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Christian Borntraeger <borntraeger@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <hca@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Vasily Gorbik <gor@linux.ibm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

54d516b1 02-Sep-2021 John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>

mm/gup: small refactoring: simplify try_grab_page()

try_grab_page() does the same thing as try_grab_compound_head(..., refs=1,
...), just with a different API. So there is a lot of code duplication
there.

Change try_grab_page() to call try_grab_compound_head(), while keeping the
API contract identical for callers.

Also, now that try_grab_compound_head() always has a caller, remove the
__maybe_unused annotation.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210813044133.1536842-3-jhubbard@nvidia.com
Signed-off-by: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Christian Borntraeger <borntraeger@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <hca@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Vasily Gorbik <gor@linux.ibm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

3967db22 02-Sep-2021 John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>

mm/gup: documentation corrections for gup/pup

Patch series "A few gup refactorings and documentation updates", v3.

While reviewing some of the other things going on around gup.c, I noticed
that the documentation was wrong for a few of the routines that I wrote.
And then I noticed that there was some significant code duplication too.
So this fixes those issues.

This is not entirely risk-free, but after looking closely at this, I think
it's actually a useful improvement, getting rid of the code duplication
here.

This patch (of 3):

The documentation for try_grab_compound_head() and try_grab_page() has
fallen a little out of date. Update and clarify a few points.

Also make it kerneldoc-correct, by adding @args documentation.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210813044133.1536842-1-jhubbard@nvidia.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210813044133.1536842-2-jhubbard@nvidia.com
Signed-off-by: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <hca@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Vasily Gorbik <gor@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Christian Borntraeger <borntraeger@de.ibm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

be51eb18 02-Sep-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm: gup: use helper PAGE_ALIGNED in populate_vma_page_range()

Use helper PAGE_ALIGNED to check if address is aligned to PAGE_SIZE.
Minor readability improvement.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210807093620.21347-6-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Claudio Imbrenda <imbrenda@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

6401c4eb 02-Sep-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm: gup: fix potential pgmap refcnt leak in __gup_device_huge()

When failed to try_grab_page, put_dev_pagemap() is missed. So pgmap
refcnt will leak in this case. Also we remove the check for pgmap against
NULL as it's also checked inside the put_dev_pagemap().

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: simplify, cleanup]
[akpm@linux-foundation.org: fix return value]

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210807093620.21347-5-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Fixes: 3faa52c03f44 ("mm/gup: track FOLL_PIN pages")
Reviewed-by: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Claudio Imbrenda <imbrenda@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

06a9e696 02-Sep-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm: gup: remove useless BUG_ON in __get_user_pages()

Indeed, this BUG_ON couldn't catch anything useful. We are sure ret == 0
here because we would already bail out if ret != 0 and ret is untouched
till here.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210807093620.21347-4-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Claudio Imbrenda <imbrenda@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

0fef147b 02-Sep-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm: gup: remove unneed local variable orig_refs

Remove unneed local variable orig_refs since refs is unchanged now.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210807093620.21347-3-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Claudio Imbrenda <imbrenda@linux.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

8fed2f3c 02-Sep-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm: gup: remove set but unused local variable major

Patch series "Cleanups and fixup for gup".

This series contains cleanups to remove unneeded variable, useless BUG_ON
and use helper to improve readability. Also we fix a potential pgmap
refcnt leak. More details can be found in the respective changelogs.

This patch (of 5):

Since commit a2beb5f1efed ("mm: clean up the last pieces of page fault
accountings"), the local variable major is unused. Remove it.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210807093620.21347-1-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210807093620.21347-2-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Claudio Imbrenda <imbrenda@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

7490a2d2 02-Sep-2021 Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>

writeback: memcg: simplify cgroup_writeback_by_id

Currently cgroup_writeback_by_id calls mem_cgroup_wb_stats() to get dirty
pages for a memcg. However mem_cgroup_wb_stats() does a lot more than
just get the number of dirty pages. Just directly get the number of dirty
pages instead of calling mem_cgroup_wb_stats(). Also
cgroup_writeback_by_id() is only called for best-effort dirty flushing, so
remove the unused 'nr' parameter and no need to explicitly flush memcg
stats.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210722182627.2267368-1-shakeelb@google.com
Signed-off-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

7ae12c80 02-Sep-2021 Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>

fs: inode: count invalidated shadow pages in pginodesteal

pginodesteal is supposed to capture the impact that inode reclaim has on
the page cache state. Currently, it doesn't consider shadow pages that
get dropped this way, even though this can have a significant impact on
paging behavior, memory pressure calculations etc.

To improve visibility into these effects, make sure shadow pages get
counted when they get dropped through inode reclaim.

This changes the return value semantics of invalidate_mapping_pages()
semantics slightly, but the only two users are the inode shrinker itsel
and a usb driver that logs it for debugging purposes.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210614211904.14420-3-hannes@cmpxchg.org
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

30472509 02-Sep-2021 Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>

mm: remove irqsave/restore locking from contexts with irqs enabled

The page cache deletion paths all have interrupts enabled, so no need to
use irqsafe/irqrestore locking variants.

They used to have irqs disabled by the memcg lock added in commit
c4843a7593a9 ("memcg: add per cgroup dirty page accounting"), but that has
since been replaced by memcg taking the page lock instead, commit
0a31bc97c80c ("mm: memcontrol: rewrite uncharge AP").

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210614211904.14420-1-hannes@cmpxchg.org
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

20792ebf 02-Sep-2021 Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>

writeback: use READ_ONCE for unlocked reads of writeback stats

We do some unlocked reads of writeback statistics like
avg_write_bandwidth, dirty_ratelimit, or bw_time_stamp. Generally we are
fine with getting somewhat out-of-date values but actually getting
different values in various parts of the functions because the compiler
decided to reload value from original memory location could confuse
calculations. Use READ_ONCE for these unlocked accesses and WRITE_ONCE
for the updates to be on the safe side.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210713104716.22868-5-jack@suse.cz
Signed-off-by: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Michael Stapelberg <stapelberg+linux@google.com>
Cc: Wu Fengguang <fengguang.wu@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

42dd235c 02-Sep-2021 Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>

writeback: rename domain_update_bandwidth()

Rename domain_update_bandwidth() to domain_update_dirty_limit(). The
original name is a misnomer. The function has nothing to do with a
bandwidth, it updates dirty limits.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210713104716.22868-4-jack@suse.cz
Signed-off-by: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Michael Stapelberg <stapelberg+linux@google.com>
Cc: Wu Fengguang <fengguang.wu@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

45a2966f 02-Sep-2021 Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>

writeback: fix bandwidth estimate for spiky workload

Michael Stapelberg has reported that for workload with short big spikes of
writes (GCC linker seem to trigger this frequently) the write throughput
is heavily underestimated and tends to steadily sink until it reaches
zero. This has rather bad impact on writeback throttling (causing
stalls). The problem is that writeback throughput estimate gets updated
at most once per 200 ms. One update happens early after we submit pages
for writeback (at that point writeout of only small fraction of pages is
completed and thus observed throughput is tiny). Next update happens only
during the next write spike (updates happen only from inode writeback and
dirty throttling code) and if that is more than 1s after previous spike,
we decide system was idle and just ignore whatever was written until this
moment.

Fix the problem by making sure writeback throughput estimate is also
updated shortly after writeback completes to get reasonable estimate of
throughput for spiky workloads.

[jack@suse.cz: avoid division by 0 in wb_update_dirty_ratelimit()]

Link: https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20210617095309.3542373-1-stapelberg+linux@google.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210713104716.22868-3-jack@suse.cz
Signed-off-by: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Reported-by: Michael Stapelberg <stapelberg+linux@google.com>
Tested-by: Michael Stapelberg <stapelberg+linux@google.com>
Cc: Wu Fengguang <fengguang.wu@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

fee468fd 02-Sep-2021 Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>

writeback: reliably update bandwidth estimation

Currently we trigger writeback bandwidth estimation from
balance_dirty_pages() and from wb_writeback(). However neither of these
need to trigger when the system is relatively idle and writeback is
triggered e.g. from fsync(2). Make sure writeback estimates happen
reliably by triggering them from do_writepages().

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210713104716.22868-2-jack@suse.cz
Signed-off-by: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Michael Stapelberg <stapelberg+linux@google.com>
Cc: Wu Fengguang <fengguang.wu@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

633a2abb 02-Sep-2021 Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>

writeback: track number of inodes under writeback

Patch series "writeback: Fix bandwidth estimates", v4.

Fix estimate of writeback throughput when device is not fully busy doing
writeback. Michael Stapelberg has reported that such workload (e.g.
generated by linking) tends to push estimated throughput down to 0 and as
a result writeback on the device is practically stalled.

The first three patches fix the reported issue, the remaining two patches
are unrelated cleanups of problems I've noticed when reading the code.

This patch (of 4):

Track number of inodes under writeback for each bdi_writeback structure.
We will use this to decide whether wb does any IO and so we can estimate
its writeback throughput. In principle we could use number of pages under
writeback (WB_WRITEBACK counter) for this however normal percpu counter
reads are too inaccurate for our purposes and summing the counter is too
expensive.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210713104519.16394-1-jack@suse.cz
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210713104716.22868-1-jack@suse.cz
Signed-off-by: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Wu Fengguang <fengguang.wu@intel.com>
Cc: Michael Stapelberg <stapelberg+linux@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

eb2169ce 02-Sep-2021 liuhailong <liuhailong@oppo.com>

mm: add kernel_misc_reclaimable in show_free_areas

Print NR_KERNEL_MISC_RECLAIMABLE stat from show_free_areas() so users can
check whether the shrinker is working correctly and to show the current
memory usage.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210813104725.4562-1-liuhailong@oppo.com
Signed-off-by: liuhailong <liuhailong@oppo.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

4f3eaf45 02-Sep-2021 Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>

mm: report a more useful address for reclaim acquisition

A recent lockdep report included these lines:

[ 96.177910] 3 locks held by containerd/770:
[ 96.177934] #0: ffff88810815ea28 (&mm->mmap_lock#2){++++}-{3:3},
at: do_user_addr_fault+0x115/0x770
[ 96.177999] #1: ffffffff82915020 (rcu_read_lock){....}-{1:2}, at:
get_swap_device+0x33/0x140
[ 96.178057] #2: ffffffff82955ba0 (fs_reclaim){+.+.}-{0:0}, at:
__fs_reclaim_acquire+0x5/0x30

While it was not useful to that bug report to know where the reclaim lock
had been acquired, it might be useful under other circumstances. Allow
the caller of __fs_reclaim_acquire to specify the instruction pointer to
use.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210719185709.1755149-1-willy@infradead.org
Signed-off-by: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Omar Sandoval <osandov@fb.com>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Cc: Boqun Feng <boqun.feng@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

8c5b3a8a 02-Sep-2021 Gavin Shan <gshan@redhat.com>

mm/debug_vm_pgtable: fix corrupted page flag

In page table entry modifying tests, set_xxx_at() are used to populate
the page table entries. On ARM64, PG_arch_1 (PG_dcache_clean) flag is
set to the target page flag if execution permission is given. The logic
exits since commit 4f04d8f00545 ("arm64: MMU definitions"). The page
flag is kept when the page is free'd to buddy's free area list. However,
it will trigger page checking failure when it's pulled from the buddy's
free area list, as the following warning messages indicate.

BUG: Bad page state in process memhog pfn:08000
page:0000000015c0a628 refcount:0 mapcount:0 \
mapping:0000000000000000 index:0x1 pfn:0x8000
flags: 0x7ffff8000000800(arch_1|node=0|zone=0|lastcpupid=0xfffff)
raw: 07ffff8000000800 dead000000000100 dead000000000122 0000000000000000
raw: 0000000000000001 0000000000000000 00000000ffffffff 0000000000000000
page dumped because: PAGE_FLAGS_CHECK_AT_PREP flag(s) set

This fixes the issue by clearing PG_arch_1 through flush_dcache_page()
after set_xxx_at() is called. For architectures other than ARM64, the
unexpected overhead of cache flushing is acceptable.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210809092631.1888748-13-gshan@redhat.com
Fixes: a5c3b9ffb0f4 ("mm/debug_vm_pgtable: add tests validating advanced arch page table helpers")
Signed-off-by: Gavin Shan <gshan@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Tested-by: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu> [powerpc 8xx]
Tested-by: Gerald Schaefer <gerald.schaefer@linux.ibm.com> [s390]
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Chunyu Hu <chuhu@redhat.com>
Cc: Qian Cai <cai@lca.pw>
Cc: Vineet Gupta <vgupta@synopsys.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

fda88cfd 02-Sep-2021 Gavin Shan <gshan@redhat.com>

mm/debug_vm_pgtable: remove unused code

The variables used by old implementation isn't needed as we switched to
"struct pgtable_debug_args". Lets remove them and related code in
debug_vm_pgtable().

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210809092631.1888748-12-gshan@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Gavin Shan <gshan@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Tested-by: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu> [powerpc 8xx]
Tested-by: Gerald Schaefer <gerald.schaefer@linux.ibm.com> [s390]
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Chunyu Hu <chuhu@redhat.com>
Cc: Qian Cai <cai@lca.pw>
Cc: Vineet Gupta <vgupta@synopsys.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

2f87f8c3 02-Sep-2021 Gavin Shan <gshan@redhat.com>

mm/debug_vm_pgtable: use struct pgtable_debug_args in PGD and P4D modifying tests

This uses struct pgtable_debug_args in PGD/P4D modifying tests. No
allocated huge page is used in these tests. Besides, the unused variable
@saved_p4dp and @saved_pudp are dropped.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210809092631.1888748-11-gshan@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Gavin Shan <gshan@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Tested-by: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu> [powerpc 8xx]
Tested-by: Gerald Schaefer <gerald.schaefer@linux.ibm.com> [s390]
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Chunyu Hu <chuhu@redhat.com>
Cc: Qian Cai <cai@lca.pw>
Cc: Vineet Gupta <vgupta@synopsys.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

4cbde03b 02-Sep-2021 Gavin Shan <gshan@redhat.com>

mm/debug_vm_pgtable: use struct pgtable_debug_args in PUD modifying tests

This uses struct pgtable_debug_args in PUD modifying tests. The allocated
huge page is used when set_pud_at() is used. The corresponding tests are
skipped if the huge page doesn't exist. Besides, the following unused
variables in debug_vm_pgtable() are dropped: @prot, @paddr, @pud_aligned.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210809092631.1888748-10-gshan@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Gavin Shan <gshan@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Tested-by: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu> [powerpc 8xx]
Tested-by: Gerald Schaefer <gerald.schaefer@linux.ibm.com> [s390]
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Chunyu Hu <chuhu@redhat.com>
Cc: Qian Cai <cai@lca.pw>
Cc: Vineet Gupta <vgupta@synopsys.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

c0fe07b0 02-Sep-2021 Gavin Shan <gshan@redhat.com>

mm/debug_vm_pgtable: use struct pgtable_debug_args in PMD modifying tests

This uses struct pgtable_debug_args in PMD modifying tests. The allocated
huge page is used when set_pmd_at() is used. The corresponding tests are
skipped if the huge page doesn't exist. Besides, the unused variable
@pmd_aligned in debug_vm_pgtable() is dropped.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210809092631.1888748-9-gshan@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Gavin Shan <gshan@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Tested-by: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu> [powerpc 8xx]
Tested-by: Gerald Schaefer <gerald.schaefer@linux.ibm.com> [s390]
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Chunyu Hu <chuhu@redhat.com>
Cc: Qian Cai <cai@lca.pw>
Cc: Vineet Gupta <vgupta@synopsys.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

44966c44 02-Sep-2021 Gavin Shan <gshan@redhat.com>

mm/debug_vm_pgtable: use struct pgtable_debug_args in PTE modifying tests

This uses struct pgtable_debug_args in PTE modifying tests. The allocated
page is used as set_pte_at() is used there. The tests are skipped if the
allocated page doesn't exist. It's notable that args->ptep need to be
mapped before the tests. The reason why we don't map args->ptep at the
beginning is PTE entry is only mapped and accessible in atomic context
when CONFIG_HIGHPTE is enabled. So we avoid to do that so that atomic
context is only enabled if needed.

Besides, the unused variable @pte_aligned and @ptep in debug_vm_pgtable()
are dropped.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210809092631.1888748-8-gshan@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Gavin Shan <gshan@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Tested-by: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu> [powerpc 8xx]
Tested-by: Gerald Schaefer <gerald.schaefer@linux.ibm.com> [s390]
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Chunyu Hu <chuhu@redhat.com>
Cc: Qian Cai <cai@lca.pw>
Cc: Vineet Gupta <vgupta@synopsys.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

4878a888 02-Sep-2021 Gavin Shan <gshan@redhat.com>

mm/debug_vm_pgtable: use struct pgtable_debug_args in migration and thp tests

This uses struct pgtable_debug_args in the migration and thp test
functions. It's notable that the pre-allocated page is used in
swap_migration_tests() as set_pte_at() is used there.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210809092631.1888748-7-gshan@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Gavin Shan <gshan@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Tested-by: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu> [powerpc 8xx]
Tested-by: Gerald Schaefer <gerald.schaefer@linux.ibm.com> [s390]
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Chunyu Hu <chuhu@redhat.com>
Cc: Qian Cai <cai@lca.pw>
Cc: Vineet Gupta <vgupta@synopsys.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

5f447e80 02-Sep-2021 Gavin Shan <gshan@redhat.com>

mm/debug_vm_pgtable: use struct pgtable_debug_args in soft_dirty and swap tests

This uses struct pgtable_debug_args in the soft_dirty and swap test
functions.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210809092631.1888748-6-gshan@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Gavin Shan <gshan@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Tested-by: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu> [powerpc 8xx]
Tested-by: Gerald Schaefer <gerald.schaefer@linux.ibm.com> [s390]
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Chunyu Hu <chuhu@redhat.com>
Cc: Qian Cai <cai@lca.pw>
Cc: Vineet Gupta <vgupta@synopsys.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

8cb183f2 02-Sep-2021 Gavin Shan <gshan@redhat.com>

mm/debug_vm_pgtable: use struct pgtable_debug_args in protnone and devmap tests

This uses struct pgtable_debug_args in protnone and devmap test functions.
After that, the unused variable @protnone in debug_vm_pgtable() is
dropped.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210809092631.1888748-5-gshan@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Gavin Shan <gshan@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Tested-by: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu> [powerpc 8xx]
Tested-by: Gerald Schaefer <gerald.schaefer@linux.ibm.com> [s390]
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Chunyu Hu <chuhu@redhat.com>
Cc: Qian Cai <cai@lca.pw>
Cc: Vineet Gupta <vgupta@synopsys.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

8983d231 02-Sep-2021 Gavin Shan <gshan@redhat.com>

mm/debug_vm_pgtable: use struct pgtable_debug_args in leaf and savewrite tests

This uses struct pgtable_debug_args in the leaf and savewrite test
functions.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210809092631.1888748-4-gshan@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Gavin Shan <gshan@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Tested-by: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu> [powerpc 8xx]
Tested-by: Gerald Schaefer <gerald.schaefer@linux.ibm.com> [s390]
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Chunyu Hu <chuhu@redhat.com>
Cc: Qian Cai <cai@lca.pw>
Cc: Vineet Gupta <vgupta@synopsys.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

36b77d1e 02-Sep-2021 Gavin Shan <gshan@redhat.com>

mm/debug_vm_pgtable: use struct pgtable_debug_args in basic tests

This uses struct pgtable_debug_args in the basic test functions. The
unused variables @pgd_aligned and @p4d_aligned in debug_vm_pgtable() are
dropped.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210809092631.1888748-3-gshan@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Gavin Shan <gshan@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Tested-by: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu> [powerpc 8xx]
Tested-by: Gerald Schaefer <gerald.schaefer@linux.ibm.com> [s390]
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Chunyu Hu <chuhu@redhat.com>
Cc: Qian Cai <cai@lca.pw>
Cc: Vineet Gupta <vgupta@synopsys.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

3c9b84f0 02-Sep-2021 Gavin Shan <gshan@redhat.com>

mm/debug_vm_pgtable: introduce struct pgtable_debug_args

Patch series "mm/debug_vm_pgtable: Enhancements", v6.

There are a couple of issues with current implementations and this series
tries to resolve the issues:

(a) All needed information are scattered in variables, passed to various
test functions. The code is organized in pretty much relaxed fashion.

(b) The page isn't allocated from buddy during page table entry modifying
tests. The page can be invalid, conflicting to the implementations
of set_xxx_at() on ARM64. The target page is accessed so that the
iCache can be flushed when execution permission is given on ARM64.
Besides, the target page can be unmapped and accessing to it causes
kernel crash.

"struct pgtable_debug_args" is introduced to address issue (a). For issue
(b), the used page is allocated from buddy in page table entry modifying
tests. The corresponding tets will be skipped if we fail to allocate the
(huge) page. For other test cases, the original page around to kernel
symbol (@start_kernel) is still used.

The patches are organized as below. PATCH[2-10] could be combined to one
patch, but it will make the review harder:

PATCH[1] introduces "struct pgtable_debug_args" as place holder of all
needed information. With it, the old and new implementation
can coexist.
PATCH[2-10] uses "struct pgtable_debug_args" in various test functions.
PATCH[11] removes the unused code for old implementation.
PATCH[12] fixes the issue of corrupted page flag for ARM64

This patch (of 6):

In debug_vm_pgtable(), there are many local variables introduced to track
the needed information and they are passed to the functions for various
test cases. It'd better to introduce a struct as place holder for these
information. With it, what the tests functions need is the struct. In
this way, the code is simplified and easier to be maintained.

Besides, set_xxx_at() could access the data on the corresponding pages in
the page table modifying tests. So the accessed pages in the tests should
have been allocated from buddy. Otherwise, we're accessing pages that
aren't owned by us. This causes issues like page flag corruption or
kernel crash on accessing unmapped page when CONFIG_DEBUG_PAGEALLOC is
enabled.

This introduces "struct pgtable_debug_args". The struct is initialized
and destroyed, but the information in the struct isn't used yet. It will
be used in subsequent patches.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210809092631.1888748-1-gshan@redhat.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210809092631.1888748-2-gshan@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Gavin Shan <gshan@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Tested-by: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu> [powerpc 8xx]
Tested-by: Gerald Schaefer <gerald.schaefer@linux.ibm.com> [s390]
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Qian Cai <cai@lca.pw>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Cc: Vineet Gupta <vgupta@synopsys.com>
Cc: Chunyu Hu <chuhu@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

6128b3af 23-Apr-2021 David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>

mm: ignore MAP_DENYWRITE in ksys_mmap_pgoff()

Let's also remove masking off MAP_DENYWRITE from ksys_mmap_pgoff():
the last in-tree occurrence of MAP_DENYWRITE is now in LEGACY_MAP_MASK,
which accepts the flag e.g., for MAP_SHARED_VALIDATE; however, the flag
is ignored throughout the kernel now.

Add a comment to LEGACY_MAP_MASK stating that MAP_DENYWRITE is ignored.

Acked-by: "Eric W. Biederman" <ebiederm@xmission.com>
Acked-by: Christian König <christian.koenig@amd.com>
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>

8d0920bd 21-Apr-2021 David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>

mm: remove VM_DENYWRITE

All in-tree users of MAP_DENYWRITE are gone. MAP_DENYWRITE cannot be
set from user space, so all users are gone; let's remove it.

Acked-by: "Eric W. Biederman" <ebiederm@xmission.com>
Acked-by: Christian König <christian.koenig@amd.com>
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>

612b23f2 02-Sep-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge tag 'memblock-v5.15-rc1' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/rppt/memblock

Pull memblock updates from Mike Rapoport:
"Robustness and debug improvements:

- add check for memory add/cap ordering

- add missing debug code to memblock_add_node()"

* tag 'memblock-v5.15-rc1' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/rppt/memblock:
memblock: Check memory add/cap ordering
memblock: Add missing debug code to memblock_add_node()


7661809d 14-Jul-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

mm: don't allow oversized kvmalloc() calls

'kvmalloc()' is a convenience function for people who want to do a
kmalloc() but fall back on vmalloc() if there aren't enough physically
contiguous pages, or if the allocation is larger than what kmalloc()
supports.

However, let's make sure it doesn't get _too_ easy to do crazy things
with it. In particular, don't allow big allocations that could be due
to integer overflow or underflow. So make sure the allocation size fits
in an 'int', to protect against trivial integer conversion issues.

Acked-by: Willy Tarreau <w@1wt.eu>
Cc: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

90c90cda 02-Sep-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge tag 'xfs-5.15-merge-6' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/fs/xfs/xfs-linux

Pull xfs updates from Darrick Wong:
"There's a lot in this cycle.

Starting with bug fixes: To avoid livelocks between the logging code
and the quota code, we've disabled the ability of quotaoff to turn off
quota accounting. (Admins can still disable quota enforcement, but
truly turning off accounting requires a remount.) We've tried to do
this in a careful enough way that there shouldn't be any user visible
effects aside from quotaoff no longer randomly hanging the system.

We've also fixed some bugs in runtime log behavior that could trip up
log recovery if (otherwise unrelated) transactions manage to start and
commit concurrently; some bugs in the GETFSMAP ioctl where we would
incorrectly restrict the range of records output if the two xfs
devices are of different sizes; a bug that resulted in fallocate
funshare failing unnecessarily; and broken behavior in the xfs inode
cache when DONTCACHE is in play.

As for new features: we now batch inode inactivations in percpu
background threads, which sharply decreases frontend thread wait time
when performing file deletions and should improve overall directory
tree deletion times. This eliminates both the problem where closing an
unlinked file (especially on a frozen fs) can stall for a long time,
and should also ease complaints about direct reclaim bogging down on
unlinked file cleanup.

Starting with this release, we've enabled pipelining of the XFS log.
On workloads with high rates of metadata updates to different shards
of the filesystem, multiple threads can be used to format committed
log updates into log checkpoints.

Lastly, with this release, two new features have graduated to
supported status: inode btree counters (for faster mounts), and
support for dates beyond Y2038. Expect these to be enabled by default
in a future release of xfsprogs.

Summary:

- Fix a potential log livelock on busy filesystems when there's so
much work going on that we can't finish a quotaoff before filling
up the log by removing the ability to disable quota accounting.

- Introduce the ability to use per-CPU data structures in XFS so that
we can do a better job of maintaining CPU locality for certain
operations.

- Defer inode inactivation work to per-CPU lists, which will help us
batch that processing. Deletions of large sparse files will
*appear* to run faster, but all that means is that we've moved the
work to the backend.

- Drop the EXPERIMENTAL warnings from the y2038+ support and the
inode btree counters, since it's been nearly a year and no
complaints have come in.

- Remove more of our bespoke kmem* variants in favor of using the
standard Linux calls.

- Prepare for the addition of log incompat features in upcoming
cycles by actually adding code to support this.

- Small cleanups of the xattr code in preparation for landing support
for full logging of extended attribute updates in a future cycle.

- Replace the various log shutdown state and flag code all over xfs
with a single atomic bit flag.

- Fix a serious log recovery bug where log item replay can be skipped
based on the start lsn of a transaction even though the transaction
commit lsn is the key data point for that by enforcing start lsns
to appear in the log in the same order as commit lsns.

- Enable pipelining in the code that pushes log items to disk.

- Drop ->writepage.

- Fix some bugs in GETFSMAP where the last fsmap record reported for
a device could extend beyond the end of the device, and a separate
bug where query keys for one device could be applied to another.

- Don't let GETFSMAP query functions edit their input parameters.

- Small cleanups to the scrub code's handling of perag structures.

- Small cleanups to the incore inode tree walk code.

- Constify btree function parameters that aren't changed, so that
there will never again be confusion about range query functions
changing their input parameters.

- Standardize the format and names of tracepoint data attributes.

- Clean up all the mount state and feature flags to use wrapped
bitset functions instead of inconsistently open-coded flag checks.

- Fix some confusion between xfs_buf hash table key variable vs.
block number.

- Fix a mis-interaction with iomap where we reported shared delalloc
cow fork extents to iomap, which would cause the iomap unshare
operation to return IO errors unnecessarily.

- Fix DONTCACHE behavior"

* tag 'xfs-5.15-merge-6' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/fs/xfs/xfs-linux: (103 commits)
xfs: fix I_DONTCACHE
xfs: only set IOMAP_F_SHARED when providing a srcmap to a write
xfs: fix perag structure refcounting error when scrub fails
xfs: rename buffer cache index variable b_bn
xfs: convert bp->b_bn references to xfs_buf_daddr()
xfs: introduce xfs_buf_daddr()
xfs: kill xfs_sb_version_has_v3inode()
xfs: introduce xfs_sb_is_v5 helper
xfs: remove unused xfs_sb_version_has wrappers
xfs: convert xfs_sb_version_has checks to use mount features
xfs: convert scrub to use mount-based feature checks
xfs: open code sb verifier feature checks
xfs: convert xfs_fs_geometry to use mount feature checks
xfs: replace XFS_FORCED_SHUTDOWN with xfs_is_shutdown
xfs: convert remaining mount flags to state flags
xfs: convert mount flags to features
xfs: consolidate mount option features in m_features
xfs: replace xfs_sb_version checks with feature flag checks
xfs: reflect sb features in xfs_mount
xfs: rework attr2 feature and mount options
...


57c78a23 01-Sep-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge tag 'arm64-upstream' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/arm64/linux

Pull arm64 updates from Catalin Marinas:

- Support for 32-bit tasks on asymmetric AArch32 systems (on top of the
scheduler changes merged via the tip tree).

- More entry.S clean-ups and conversion to C.

- MTE updates: allow a preferred tag checking mode to be set per CPU
(the overhead of synchronous mode is smaller for some CPUs than
others); optimisations for kernel entry/exit path; optionally disable
MTE on the kernel command line.

- Kselftest improvements for SVE and signal handling, PtrAuth.

- Fix unlikely race where a TLBI could use stale ASID on an ASID
roll-over (found by inspection).

- Miscellaneous fixes: disable trapping of PMSNEVFR_EL1 to higher
exception levels; drop unnecessary sigdelsetmask() call in the
signal32 handling; remove BUG_ON when failing to allocate SVE state
(just signal the process); SYM_CODE annotations.

- Other trivial clean-ups: use macros instead of magic numbers, remove
redundant returns, typos.

* tag 'arm64-upstream' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/arm64/linux: (56 commits)
arm64: Do not trap PMSNEVFR_EL1
arm64: mm: fix comment typo of pud_offset_phys()
arm64: signal32: Drop pointless call to sigdelsetmask()
arm64/sve: Better handle failure to allocate SVE register storage
arm64: Document the requirement for SCR_EL3.HCE
arm64: head: avoid over-mapping in map_memory
arm64/sve: Add a comment documenting the binutils needed for SVE asm
arm64/sve: Add some comments for sve_save/load_state()
kselftest/arm64: signal: Add a TODO list for signal handling tests
kselftest/arm64: signal: Add test case for SVE register state in signals
kselftest/arm64: signal: Verify that signals can't change the SVE vector length
kselftest/arm64: signal: Check SVE signal frame shows expected vector length
kselftest/arm64: signal: Support signal frames with SVE register data
kselftest/arm64: signal: Add SVE to the set of features we can check for
arm64: replace in_irq() with in_hardirq()
kselftest/arm64: pac: Fix skipping of tests on systems without PAC
Documentation: arm64: describe asymmetric 32-bit support
arm64: Remove logic to kill 32-bit tasks on 64-bit-only cores
arm64: Hook up cmdline parameter to allow mismatched 32-bit EL0
arm64: Advertise CPUs capable of running 32-bit applications in sysfs
...


9e9fb765 31-Aug-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge tag 'net-next-5.15' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/netdev/net-next

Pull networking updates from Jakub Kicinski:
"Core:

- Enable memcg accounting for various networking objects.

BPF:

- Introduce bpf timers.

- Add perf link and opaque bpf_cookie which the program can read out
again, to be used in libbpf-based USDT library.

- Add bpf_task_pt_regs() helper to access user space pt_regs in
kprobes, to help user space stack unwinding.

- Add support for UNIX sockets for BPF sockmap.

- Extend BPF iterator support for UNIX domain sockets.

- Allow BPF TCP congestion control progs and bpf iterators to call
bpf_setsockopt(), e.g. to switch to another congestion control
algorithm.

Protocols:

- Support IOAM Pre-allocated Trace with IPv6.

- Support Management Component Transport Protocol.

- bridge: multicast: add vlan support.

- netfilter: add hooks for the SRv6 lightweight tunnel driver.

- tcp:
- enable mid-stream window clamping (by user space or BPF)
- allow data-less, empty-cookie SYN with TFO_SERVER_COOKIE_NOT_REQD
- more accurate DSACK processing for RACK-TLP

- mptcp:
- add full mesh path manager option
- add partial support for MP_FAIL
- improve use of backup subflows
- optimize option processing

- af_unix: add OOB notification support.

- ipv6: add IFLA_INET6_RA_MTU to expose MTU value advertised by the
router.

- mac80211: Target Wake Time support in AP mode.

- can: j1939: extend UAPI to notify about RX status.

Driver APIs:

- Add page frag support in page pool API.

- Many improvements to the DSA (distributed switch) APIs.

- ethtool: extend IRQ coalesce uAPI with timer reset modes.

- devlink: control which auxiliary devices are created.

- Support CAN PHYs via the generic PHY subsystem.

- Proper cross-chip support for tag_8021q.

- Allow TX forwarding for the software bridge data path to be
offloaded to capable devices.

Drivers:

- veth: more flexible channels number configuration.

- openvswitch: introduce per-cpu upcall dispatch.

- Add internet mix (IMIX) mode to pktgen.

- Transparently handle XDP operations in the bonding driver.

- Add LiteETH network driver.

- Renesas (ravb):
- support Gigabit Ethernet IP

- NXP Ethernet switch (sja1105):
- fast aging support
- support for "H" switch topologies
- traffic termination for ports under VLAN-aware bridge

- Intel 1G Ethernet
- support getcrosststamp() with PCIe PTM (Precision Time
Measurement) for better time sync
- support Credit-Based Shaper (CBS) offload, enabling HW traffic
prioritization and bandwidth reservation

- Broadcom Ethernet (bnxt)
- support pulse-per-second output
- support larger Rx rings

- Mellanox Ethernet (mlx5)
- support ethtool RSS contexts and MQPRIO channel mode
- support LAG offload with bridging
- support devlink rate limit API
- support packet sampling on tunnels

- Huawei Ethernet (hns3):
- basic devlink support
- add extended IRQ coalescing support
- report extended link state

- Netronome Ethernet (nfp):
- add conntrack offload support

- Broadcom WiFi (brcmfmac):
- add WPA3 Personal with FT to supported cipher suites
- support 43752 SDIO device

- Intel WiFi (iwlwifi):
- support scanning hidden 6GHz networks
- support for a new hardware family (Bz)

- Xen pv driver:
- harden netfront against malicious backends

- Qualcomm mobile
- ipa: refactor power management and enable automatic suspend
- mhi: move MBIM to WWAN subsystem interfaces

Refactor:

- Ambient BPF run context and cgroup storage cleanup.

- Compat rework for ndo_ioctl.

Old code removal:

- prism54 remove the obsoleted driver, deprecated by the p54 driver.

- wan: remove sbni/granch driver"

* tag 'net-next-5.15' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/netdev/net-next: (1715 commits)
net: Add depends on OF_NET for LiteX's LiteETH
ipv6: seg6: remove duplicated include
net: hns3: remove unnecessary spaces
net: hns3: add some required spaces
net: hns3: clean up a type mismatch warning
net: hns3: refine function hns3_set_default_feature()
ipv6: remove duplicated 'net/lwtunnel.h' include
net: w5100: check return value after calling platform_get_resource()
net/mlxbf_gige: Make use of devm_platform_ioremap_resourcexxx()
net: mdio: mscc-miim: Make use of the helper function devm_platform_ioremap_resource()
net: mdio-ipq4019: Make use of devm_platform_ioremap_resource()
fou: remove sparse errors
ipv4: fix endianness issue in inet_rtm_getroute_build_skb()
octeontx2-af: Set proper errorcode for IPv4 checksum errors
octeontx2-af: Fix static code analyzer reported issues
octeontx2-af: Fix mailbox errors in nix_rss_flowkey_cfg
octeontx2-af: Fix loop in free and unmap counter
af_unix: fix potential NULL deref in unix_dgram_connect()
dpaa2-eth: Replace strlcpy with strscpy
octeontx2-af: Use NDC TX for transmit packet data
...


87045e65 31-Aug-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge tag 'for-5.15-tag' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/kdave/linux

Pull btrfs updates from David Sterba:
"The highlights of this round are integrations with fs-verity and
idmapped mounts, the rest is usual mix of minor improvements, speedups
and cleanups.

There are some patches outside of btrfs, namely updating some VFS
interfaces, all straightforward and acked.

Features:

- fs-verity support, using standard ioctls, backward compatible with
read-only limitation on inodes with previously enabled fs-verity

- idmapped mount support

- make mount with rescue=ibadroots more tolerant to partially damaged
trees

- allow raid0 on a single device and raid10 on two devices,
degenerate cases but might be useful as an intermediate step during
conversion to other profiles

- zoned mode block group auto reclaim can be disabled via sysfs knob

Performance improvements:

- continue readahead of node siblings even if target node is in
memory, could speed up full send (on sample test +11%)

- batching of delayed items can speed up creating many files

- fsync/tree-log speedups
- avoid unnecessary work (gains +2% throughput, -2% run time on
sample load)
- reduced lock contention on renames (on dbench +4% throughput,
up to -30% latency)

Fixes:

- various zoned mode fixes

- preemptive flushing threshold tuning, avoid excessive work on
almost full filesystems

Core:

- continued subpage support, preparation for implementing remaining
features like compression and defragmentation; with some
limitations, write is now enabled on 64K page systems with 4K
sectors, still considered experimental
- no readahead on compressed reads
- inline extents disabled
- disabled raid56 profile conversion and mount

- improved flushing logic, fixing early ENOSPC on some workloads

- inode flags have been internally split to read-only and read-write
incompat bit parts, used by fs-verity

- new tree items for fs-verity
- descriptor item
- Merkle tree item

- inode operations extended to be namespace-aware

- cleanups and refactoring

Generic code changes:

- fs: new export filemap_fdatawrite_wbc

- fs: removed sync_inode

- block: bio_trim argument type fixups

- vfs: add namespace-aware lookup"

* tag 'for-5.15-tag' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/kdave/linux: (114 commits)
btrfs: reset replace target device to allocation state on close
btrfs: zoned: fix ordered extent boundary calculation
btrfs: do not do preemptive flushing if the majority is global rsv
btrfs: reduce the preemptive flushing threshold to 90%
btrfs: tree-log: check btrfs_lookup_data_extent return value
btrfs: avoid unnecessarily logging directories that had no changes
btrfs: allow idmapped mount
btrfs: handle ACLs on idmapped mounts
btrfs: allow idmapped INO_LOOKUP_USER ioctl
btrfs: allow idmapped SUBVOL_SETFLAGS ioctl
btrfs: allow idmapped SET_RECEIVED_SUBVOL ioctls
btrfs: relax restrictions for SNAP_DESTROY_V2 with subvolids
btrfs: allow idmapped SNAP_DESTROY ioctls
btrfs: allow idmapped SNAP_CREATE/SUBVOL_CREATE ioctls
btrfs: check whether fsgid/fsuid are mapped during subvolume creation
btrfs: allow idmapped permission inode op
btrfs: allow idmapped setattr inode op
btrfs: allow idmapped tmpfile inode op
btrfs: allow idmapped symlink inode op
btrfs: allow idmapped mkdir inode op
...


65266a7c 31-Aug-2021 Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>

Merge remote-tracking branch 'tip/sched/arm64' into for-next/core

* tip/sched/arm64: (785 commits)
Documentation: arm64: describe asymmetric 32-bit support
arm64: Remove logic to kill 32-bit tasks on 64-bit-only cores
arm64: Hook up cmdline parameter to allow mismatched 32-bit EL0
arm64: Advertise CPUs capable of running 32-bit applications in sysfs
arm64: Prevent offlining first CPU with 32-bit EL0 on mismatched system
arm64: exec: Adjust affinity for compat tasks with mismatched 32-bit EL0
arm64: Implement task_cpu_possible_mask()
sched: Introduce dl_task_check_affinity() to check proposed affinity
sched: Allow task CPU affinity to be restricted on asymmetric systems
sched: Split the guts of sched_setaffinity() into a helper function
sched: Introduce task_struct::user_cpus_ptr to track requested affinity
sched: Reject CPU affinity changes based on task_cpu_possible_mask()
cpuset: Cleanup cpuset_cpus_allowed_fallback() use in select_fallback_rq()
cpuset: Honour task_cpu_possible_mask() in guarantee_online_cpus()
cpuset: Don't use the cpu_possible_mask as a last resort for cgroup v1
sched: Introduce task_cpu_possible_mask() to limit fallback rq selection
sched: Cgroup SCHED_IDLE support
sched/topology: Skip updating masks for non-online nodes
Linux 5.14-rc6
lib: use PFN_PHYS() in devmem_is_allowed()
...


67936911 30-Aug-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge tag 'for-5.15/block-2021-08-30' of git://git.kernel.dk/linux-block

Pull block updates from Jens Axboe:
"Nothing major in here - lots of good cleanups and tech debt handling,
which is also evident in the diffstats. In particular:

- Add disk sequence numbers (Matteo)

- Discard merge fix (Ming)

- Relax disk zoned reporting restrictions (Niklas)

- Bio error handling zoned leak fix (Pavel)

- Start of proper add_disk() error handling (Luis, Christoph)

- blk crypto fix (Eric)

- Non-standard GPT location support (Dmitry)

- IO priority improvements and cleanups (Damien)o

- blk-throtl improvements (Chunguang)

- diskstats_show() stack reduction (Abd-Alrhman)

- Loop scheduler selection (Bart)

- Switch block layer to use kmap_local_page() (Christoph)

- Remove obsolete disk_name helper (Christoph)

- block_device refcounting improvements (Christoph)

- Ensure gendisk always has a request queue reference (Christoph)

- Misc fixes/cleanups (Shaokun, Oliver, Guoqing)"

* tag 'for-5.15/block-2021-08-30' of git://git.kernel.dk/linux-block: (129 commits)
sg: pass the device name to blk_trace_setup
block, bfq: cleanup the repeated declaration
blk-crypto: fix check for too-large dun_bytes
blk-zoned: allow BLKREPORTZONE without CAP_SYS_ADMIN
blk-zoned: allow zone management send operations without CAP_SYS_ADMIN
block: mark blkdev_fsync static
block: refine the disk_live check in del_gendisk
mmc: sdhci-tegra: Enable MMC_CAP2_ALT_GPT_TEGRA
mmc: block: Support alternative_gpt_sector() operation
partitions/efi: Support non-standard GPT location
block: Add alternative_gpt_sector() operation
bio: fix page leak bio_add_hw_page failure
block: remove CONFIG_DEBUG_BLOCK_EXT_DEVT
block: remove a pointless call to MINOR() in device_add_disk
null_blk: add error handling support for add_disk()
virtio_blk: add error handling support for add_disk()
block: add error handling for device_add_disk / add_disk
block: return errors from disk_alloc_events
block: return errors from blk_integrity_add
block: call blk_register_queue earlier in device_add_disk
...


08403e21 30-Aug-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge tag 'smp-core-2021-08-30' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/tip/tip

Pull SMP core updates from Thomas Gleixner:

- Replace get/put_online_cpus() in various places. The final removal
will happen shortly before v5.15-rc1 when the rest of the patches
have been merged.

- Add debug code to help the analysis of CPU hotplug failures

- A set of kernel doc updates

* tag 'smp-core-2021-08-30' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/tip/tip:
mm: Replace deprecated CPU-hotplug functions.
md/raid5: Replace deprecated CPU-hotplug functions.
Documentation: Replace deprecated CPU-hotplug functions.
smp: Fix all kernel-doc warnings
cpu/hotplug: Add debug printks for hotplug callback failures
cpu/hotplug: Use DEVICE_ATTR_*() macro
cpu/hotplug: Eliminate all kernel-doc warnings
cpu/hotplug: Fix kernel doc warnings for __cpuhp_setup_state_cpuslocked()
cpu/hotplug: Fix comment typo
smpboot: Replace deprecated CPU-hotplug functions.


c7a5238e 30-Aug-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge tag 's390-5.15-1' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/s390/linux

Pull s390 updates from Heiko Carstens:

- Improve ftrace code patching so that stop_machine is not required
anymore. This requires a small common code patch acked by Steven
Rostedt:

https://lore.kernel.org/linux-s390/20210730220741.4da6fdf6@oasis.local.home/

- Enable KCSAN for s390. This comes with a small common code change to
fix a compile warning. Acked by Marco Elver:

https://lore.kernel.org/r/20210729142811.1309391-1-hca@linux.ibm.com

- Add KFENCE support for s390. This also comes with a minimal x86 patch
from Marco Elver who said also this can be carried via the s390 tree:

https://lore.kernel.org/linux-s390/YQJdarx6XSUQ1tFZ@elver.google.com/

- More changes to prepare the decompressor for relocation.

- Enable DAT also for CPU restart path.

- Final set of register asm removal patches; leaving only three
locations where needed and sane.

- Add NNPA, Vector-Packed-Decimal-Enhancement Facility 2, PCI MIO
support to hwcaps flags.

- Cleanup hwcaps implementation.

- Add new instructions to in-kernel disassembler.

- Various QDIO cleanups.

- Add SCLP debug feature.

- Various other cleanups and improvements all over the place.

* tag 's390-5.15-1' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/s390/linux: (105 commits)
s390: remove SCHED_CORE from defconfigs
s390/smp: do not use nodat_stack for secondary CPU start
s390/smp: enable DAT before CPU restart callback is called
s390: update defconfigs
s390/ap: fix state machine hang after failure to enable irq
KVM: s390: generate kvm hypercall functions
s390/sclp: add tracing of SCLP interactions
s390/debug: add early tracing support
s390/debug: fix debug area life cycle
s390/debug: keep debug data on resize
s390/diag: make restart_part2 a local label
s390/mm,pageattr: fix walk_pte_level() early exit
s390: fix typo in linker script
s390: remove do_signal() prototype and do_notify_resume() function
s390/crypto: fix all kernel-doc warnings in vfio_ap_ops.c
s390/pci: improve DMA translation init and exit
s390/pci: simplify CLP List PCI handling
s390/pci: handle FH state mismatch only on disable
s390/pci: fix misleading rc in clp_set_pci_fn()
s390/boot: factor out offset_vmlinux_info() function
...


6f01c935 30-Aug-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge tag 'locks-v5.15' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/jlayton/linux

Pull file locking updates from Jeff Layton:
"This starts with a couple of fixes for potential deadlocks in the
fowner/fasync handling.

The next patch removes the old mandatory locking code from the kernel
altogether.

The last patch cleans up rw_verify_area a bit more after the mandatory
locking removal"

* tag 'locks-v5.15' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/jlayton/linux:
fs: clean up after mandatory file locking support removal
fs: remove mandatory file locking support
fcntl: fix potential deadlock for &fasync_struct.fa_lock
fcntl: fix potential deadlocks for &fown_struct.lock


aa99f3c2 30-Aug-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge tag 'hole_punch_for_v5.15-rc1' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/jack/linux-fs

Pull fs hole punching vs cache filling race fixes from Jan Kara:
"Fix races leading to possible data corruption or stale data exposure
in multiple filesystems when hole punching races with operations such
as readahead.

This is the series I was sending for the last merge window but with
your objection fixed - now filemap_fault() has been modified to take
invalidate_lock only when we need to create new page in the page cache
and / or bring it uptodate"

* tag 'hole_punch_for_v5.15-rc1' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/jack/linux-fs:
filesystems/locking: fix Malformed table warning
cifs: Fix race between hole punch and page fault
ceph: Fix race between hole punch and page fault
fuse: Convert to using invalidate_lock
f2fs: Convert to using invalidate_lock
zonefs: Convert to using invalidate_lock
xfs: Convert double locking of MMAPLOCK to use VFS helpers
xfs: Convert to use invalidate_lock
xfs: Refactor xfs_isilocked()
ext2: Convert to using invalidate_lock
ext4: Convert to use mapping->invalidate_lock
mm: Add functions to lock invalidate_lock for two mappings
mm: Protect operations adding pages to page cache with invalidate_lock
documentation: Sync file_operations members with reality
mm: Fix comments mentioning i_mutex


7625eccd 03-Aug-2021 Sebastian Andrzej Siewior <bigeasy@linutronix.de>

mm: Replace deprecated CPU-hotplug functions.

The functions get_online_cpus() and put_online_cpus() have been
deprecated during the CPU hotplug rework. They map directly to
cpus_read_lock() and cpus_read_unlock().

Replace deprecated CPU-hotplug functions with the official version.
The behavior remains unchanged.

Signed-off-by: Sebastian Andrzej Siewior <bigeasy@linutronix.de>
Signed-off-by: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20210803141621.780504-21-bigeasy@linutronix.de

97c78d0a 26-Aug-2021 Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>

Merge git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/netdev/net

drivers/net/wwan/mhi_wwan_mbim.c - drop the extra arg.

Signed-off-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>


946746d1 25-Aug-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/memory_hotplug: fix potential permanent lru cache disable

If offline_pages failed after lru_cache_disable(), it forgot to do
lru_cache_enable() in error path. So we would have lru cache disabled
permanently in this case.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210821094246.10149-3-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Fixes: d479960e44f2 ("mm: disable LRU pagevec during the migration temporarily")
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Reviewed-by: Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>
Cc: Chris Goldsworthy <cgoldswo@codeaurora.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

5a798493 14-Jul-2021 Josef Bacik <josef@toxicpanda.com>

fs: add a filemap_fdatawrite_wbc helper

Btrfs sometimes needs to flush dirty pages on a bunch of dirty inodes in
order to reclaim metadata reservations. Unfortunately most helpers in
this area are too smart for us:

1) The normal filemap_fdata* helpers only take range and sync modes, and
don't give any indication of how much was written, so we can only
flush full inodes, which isn't what we want in most cases.
2) The normal writeback path requires us to have the s_umount sem held,
but we can't unconditionally take it in this path because we could
deadlock.
3) The normal writeback path also skips inodes with I_SYNC set if we
write with WB_SYNC_NONE. This isn't the behavior we want under heavy
ENOSPC pressure, we want to actually make sure the pages are under
writeback before returning, and if another thread is in the middle of
writing the file we may return before they're under writeback and
miss our ordered extents and not properly wait for completion.
4) sync_inode() uses the normal writeback path and has the same problem
as #3.

What we really want is to call do_writepages() with our wbc. This way
we can make sure that writeback is actually started on the pages, and we
can control how many pages are written as a whole as we write many
inodes using the same wbc. Accomplish this with a new helper that does
just that so we can use it for our ENOSPC flushing infrastructure.

Reviewed-by: Nikolay Borisov <nborisov@suse.com>
Reviewed-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Signed-off-by: Josef Bacik <josef@toxicpanda.com>
Reviewed-by: David Sterba <dsterba@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: David Sterba <dsterba@suse.com>

f7e33bdb 19-Aug-2021 Jeff Layton <jlayton@kernel.org>

fs: remove mandatory file locking support

We added CONFIG_MANDATORY_FILE_LOCKING in 2015, and soon after turned it
off in Fedora and RHEL8. Several other distros have followed suit.

I've heard of one problem in all that time: Someone migrated from an
older distro that supported "-o mand" to one that didn't, and the host
had a fstab entry with "mand" in it which broke on reboot. They didn't
actually _use_ mandatory locking so they just removed the mount option
and moved on.

This patch rips out mandatory locking support wholesale from the kernel,
along with the Kconfig option and the Documentation file. It also
changes the mount code to ignore the "mand" mount option instead of
erroring out, and to throw a big, ugly warning.

Signed-off-by: Jeff Layton <jlayton@kernel.org>

c7b1850d 19-Aug-2021 Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>

hugetlb: don't pass page cache pages to restore_reserve_on_error

syzbot hit kernel BUG at fs/hugetlbfs/inode.c:532 as described in [1].
This BUG triggers if the HPageRestoreReserve flag is set on a page in
the page cache. It should never be set, as the routine
huge_add_to_page_cache explicitly clears the flag after adding a page to
the cache.

The only code other than huge page allocation which sets the flag is
restore_reserve_on_error. It will potentially set the flag in rare out
of memory conditions. syzbot was injecting errors to cause memory
allocation errors which exercised this specific path.

The code in restore_reserve_on_error is doing the right thing. However,
there are instances where pages in the page cache were being passed to
restore_reserve_on_error. This is incorrect, as once a page goes into
the cache reservation information will not be modified for the page
until it is removed from the cache. Error paths do not remove pages
from the cache, so even in the case of error, the page will remain in
the cache and no reservation adjustment is needed.

Modify routines that potentially call restore_reserve_on_error with a
page cache page to no longer do so.

Note on fixes tag: Prior to commit 846be08578ed ("mm/hugetlb: expand
restore_reserve_on_error functionality") the routine would not process
page cache pages because the HPageRestoreReserve flag is not set on such
pages. Therefore, this issue could not be trigggered. The code added
by commit 846be08578ed ("mm/hugetlb: expand restore_reserve_on_error
functionality") is needed and correct. It exposed incorrect calls to
restore_reserve_on_error which is the root cause addressed by this
commit.

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-mm/00000000000050776d05c9b7c7f0@google.com/

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210818213304.37038-1-mike.kravetz@oracle.com
Fixes: 846be08578ed ("mm/hugetlb: expand restore_reserve_on_error functionality")
Signed-off-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Reported-by: <syzbot+67654e51e54455f1c585@syzkaller.appspotmail.com>
Cc: Mina Almasry <almasrymina@google.com>
Cc: Axel Rasmussen <axelrasmussen@google.com>
Cc: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@linux.dev>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

57f29762 19-Aug-2021 Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>

mm: vmscan: fix missing psi annotation for node_reclaim()

In a debugging session the other day, Rik noticed that node_reclaim()
was missing memstall annotations. This means we'll miss pressure and
lost productivity resulting from reclaim on an overloaded local NUMA
node when vm.zone_reclaim_mode is enabled.

There haven't been any reports, but that's likely because
vm.zone_reclaim_mode hasn't been a commonly used feature recently, and
the intersection between such setups and psi users is probably nil.

But secondary memory such as CXL-connected DIMMS, persistent memory etc,
and the page demotion patches that handle them
(https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20210401183216.443C4443@viggo.jf.intel.com/)
could soon make this a more common codepath again.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210818152457.35846-1-hannes@cmpxchg.org
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Reported-by: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Reviewed-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

fcc00621 19-Aug-2021 Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>

mm/hwpoison: retry with shake_page() for unhandlable pages

HWPoisonHandlable() sometimes returns false for typical user pages due
to races with average memory events like transfers over LRU lists. This
causes failures in hwpoison handling.

There's retry code for such a case but does not work because the retry
loop reaches the retry limit too quickly before the page settles down to
handlable state. Let get_any_page() call shake_page() to fix it.

[naoya.horiguchi@nec.com: get_any_page(): return -EIO when retry limit reached]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210819001958.2365157-1-naoya.horiguchi@linux.dev

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210817053703.2267588-1-naoya.horiguchi@linux.dev
Fixes: 25182f05ffed ("mm,hwpoison: fix race with hugetlb page allocation")
Signed-off-by: Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>
Reported-by: Tony Luck <tony.luck@intel.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org> [5.13+]
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

f56ce412 19-Aug-2021 Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>

mm: memcontrol: fix occasional OOMs due to proportional memory.low reclaim

We've noticed occasional OOM killing when memory.low settings are in
effect for cgroups. This is unexpected and undesirable as memory.low is
supposed to express non-OOMing memory priorities between cgroups.

The reason for this is proportional memory.low reclaim. When cgroups
are below their memory.low threshold, reclaim passes them over in the
first round, and then retries if it couldn't find pages anywhere else.
But when cgroups are slightly above their memory.low setting, page scan
force is scaled down and diminished in proportion to the overage, to the
point where it can cause reclaim to fail as well - only in that case we
currently don't retry, and instead trigger OOM.

To fix this, hook proportional reclaim into the same retry logic we have
in place for when cgroups are skipped entirely. This way if reclaim
fails and some cgroups were scanned with diminished pressure, we'll try
another full-force cycle before giving up and OOMing.

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding-style fixes]

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210817180506.220056-1-hannes@cmpxchg.org
Fixes: 9783aa9917f8 ("mm, memcg: proportional memory.{low,min} reclaim")
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Reported-by: Leon Yang <lnyng@fb.com>
Reviewed-by: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Reviewed-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Acked-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Acked-by: Chris Down <chris@chrisdown.name>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org> [5.4+]
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

47aef601 19-Aug-2021 Doug Berger <opendmb@gmail.com>

mm/page_alloc: don't corrupt pcppage_migratetype

When placing pages on a pcp list, migratetype values over
MIGRATE_PCPTYPES get added to the MIGRATE_MOVABLE pcp list.

However, the actual migratetype is preserved in the page and should
not be changed to MIGRATE_MOVABLE or the page may end up on the wrong
free_list.

The impact is that HIGHATOMIC or CMA pages getting bulk freed from the
PCP lists could potentially end up on the wrong buddy list. There are
various consequences but minimally NR_FREE_CMA_PAGES accounting could
get screwed up.

[mgorman@techsingularity.net: changelog update]

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210811182917.2607994-1-opendmb@gmail.com
Fixes: df1acc856923 ("mm/page_alloc: avoid conflating IRQs disabled with zone->lock")
Signed-off-by: Doug Berger <opendmb@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Cc: "Peter Zijlstra (Intel)" <peterz@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

c04b3d06 19-Aug-2021 Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>

Revert "mm: swap: check if swap backing device is congested or not"

Due to the change about how block layer detects congestion the
justification of commit 8fd2e0b505d1 ("mm: swap: check if swap backing
device is congested or not") doesn't stand anymore, so the commit could
be just reverted in order to solve the race reported by commit
2efa33fc7f6e ("mm/shmem: fix shmem_swapin() race with swapoff"). The
fix was reverted by the previous patch.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210810202936.2672-3-shy828301@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Suggested-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Acked-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: "Huang, Ying" <ying.huang@intel.com>
Cc: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

b1e1ef34 19-Aug-2021 Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>

Revert "mm/shmem: fix shmem_swapin() race with swapoff"

Due to the change about how block layer detects congestion the
justification of commit 8fd2e0b505d1 ("mm: swap: check if swap backing
device is congested or not") doesn't stand anymore, so the commit could
be just reverted in order to solve the race reported by commit
2efa33fc7f6e ("mm/shmem: fix shmem_swapin() race with swapoff"), so the
fix commit could be just reverted as well.

And that fix is also kind of buggy as discussed by [1] and [2].

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-mm/24187e5e-069-9f3f-cefe-39ac70783753@google.com/
[2] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-mm/e82380b9-3ad4-4a52-be50-6d45c7f2b5da@google.com/

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210810202936.2672-2-shy828301@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Suggested-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Acked-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: "Huang, Ying" <ying.huang@intel.com>
Cc: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

2423de2e 11-Aug-2021 Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>

ARM: 9115/1: mm/maccess: fix unaligned copy_{from,to}_kernel_nofault

On machines such as ARMv5 that trap unaligned accesses, these
two functions can be slow when each access needs to be emulated,
or they might not work at all.

Change them so that each loop is only used when both the src
and dst pointers are naturally aligned.

Reviewed-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Reviewed-by: Linus Walleij <linus.walleij@linaro.org>
Signed-off-by: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Signed-off-by: Russell King (Oracle) <rmk+kernel@armlinux.org.uk>

f444fea7 19-Aug-2021 Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>

Merge git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/netdev/net

drivers/ptp/Kconfig:
55c8fca1dae1 ("ptp_pch: Restore dependency on PCI")
e5f31552674e ("ethernet: fix PTP_1588_CLOCK dependencies")

Signed-off-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>


c0891ac1 02-Aug-2021 Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>

isystem: ship and use stdarg.h

Ship minimal stdarg.h (1 type, 4 macros) as <linux/stdarg.h>.
stdarg.h is the only userspace header commonly used in the kernel.

GPL 2 version of <stdarg.h> can be extracted from
http://archive.debian.org/debian/pool/main/g/gcc-4.2/gcc-4.2_4.2.4.orig.tar.gz

Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Rafael J. Wysocki <rafael.j.wysocki@intel.com>
Acked-by: Ard Biesheuvel <ardb@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Masahiro Yamada <masahiroy@kernel.org>

4b1327be 17-Aug-2021 Wei Wang <weiwan@google.com>

net-memcg: pass in gfp_t mask to mem_cgroup_charge_skmem()

Add gfp_t mask as an input parameter to mem_cgroup_charge_skmem(),
to give more control to the networking stack and enable it to change
memcg charging behavior. In the future, the networking stack may decide
to avoid oom-kills when fallbacks are more appropriate.

One behavior change in mem_cgroup_charge_skmem() by this patch is to
avoid force charging by default and let the caller decide when and if
force charging is needed through the presence or absence of
__GFP_NOFAIL.

Signed-off-by: Wei Wang <weiwan@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>

7fa0dacb 13-Aug-2021 Waiman Long <longman@redhat.com>

mm/memcg: fix incorrect flushing of lruvec data in obj_stock

When mod_objcg_state() is called with a pgdat that is different from
that in the obj_stock, the old lruvec data cached in obj_stock are
flushed out. Unfortunately, they were flushed to the new pgdat and so
the data go to the wrong node. This will screw up the slab data
reported in /sys/devices/system/node/node*/meminfo.

Fix that by flushing the data to the cached pgdat instead.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210802143834.30578-1-longman@redhat.com
Fixes: 68ac5b3c8db2 ("mm/memcg: cache vmstat data in percpu memcg_stock_pcp")
Signed-off-by: Waiman Long <longman@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Reviewed-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Acked-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Vladimir Davydov <vdavydov.dev@gmail.com>
Cc: Tejun Heo <tj@kernel.org>
Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Cc: Alex Shi <alex.shi@linux.alibaba.com>
Cc: Chris Down <chris@chrisdown.name>
Cc: Yafang Shao <laoar.shao@gmail.com>
Cc: Wei Yang <richard.weiyang@gmail.com>
Cc: Masayoshi Mizuma <msys.mizuma@gmail.com>
Cc: Xing Zhengjun <zhengjun.xing@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Waiman Long <longman@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

eb2faa51 13-Aug-2021 David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>

mm/madvise: report SIGBUS as -EFAULT for MADV_POPULATE_(READ|WRITE)

Doing some extended tests and polishing the man page update for
MADV_POPULATE_(READ|WRITE), I realized that we end up converting also
SIGBUS (via -EFAULT) to -EINVAL, making it look like yet another
madvise() user error.

We want to report only problematic mappings and permission problems that
the user could have know as -EINVAL.

Let's not convert -EFAULT arising due to SIGBUS (or SIGSEGV) to -EINVAL,
but instead indicate -EFAULT to user space. While we could also convert
it to -ENOMEM, using -EFAULT looks more helpful when user space might
want to troubleshoot what's going wrong: MADV_POPULATE_(READ|WRITE) is
not part of an final Linux release and we can still adjust the behavior.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210726154932.102880-1-david@redhat.com
Fixes: 4ca9b3859dac ("mm/madvise: introduce MADV_POPULATE_(READ|WRITE) to prefault page tables")
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Jann Horn <jannh@google.com>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@ziepe.ca>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Michael S. Tsirkin <mst@redhat.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Richard Henderson <rth@twiddle.net>
Cc: Ivan Kokshaysky <ink@jurassic.park.msu.ru>
Cc: Matt Turner <mattst88@gmail.com>
Cc: Thomas Bogendoerfer <tsbogend@alpha.franken.de>
Cc: "James E.J. Bottomley" <James.Bottomley@HansenPartnership.com>
Cc: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de>
Cc: Chris Zankel <chris@zankel.net>
Cc: Max Filippov <jcmvbkbc@gmail.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Rolf Eike Beer <eike-kernel@sf-tec.de>
Cc: Ram Pai <linuxram@us.ibm.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

a7f1d485 13-Aug-2021 Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>

mm: slub: fix slub_debug disabling for list of slabs

Vijayanand Jitta reports:

Consider the scenario where CONFIG_SLUB_DEBUG_ON is set and we would
want to disable slub_debug for few slabs. Using boot parameter with
slub_debug=-,slab_name syntax doesn't work as expected i.e; only
disabling debugging for the specified list of slabs. Instead it
disables debugging for all slabs, which is wrong.

This patch fixes it by delaying the moment when the global slub_debug
flags variable is updated. In case a "slub_debug=-,slab_name" has been
passed, the global flags remain as initialized (depending on
CONFIG_SLUB_DEBUG_ON enabled or disabled) and are not simply reset to 0.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/8a3d992a-473a-467b-28a0-4ad2ff60ab82@suse.cz
Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Reported-by: Vijayanand Jitta <vjitta@codeaurora.org>
Reviewed-by: Vijayanand Jitta <vjitta@codeaurora.org>
Acked-by: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Vinayak Menon <vinmenon@codeaurora.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

1ed7ce57 13-Aug-2021 Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>

slub: fix kmalloc_pagealloc_invalid_free unit test

The unit test kmalloc_pagealloc_invalid_free makes sure that for the
higher order slub allocation which goes to page allocator, the free is
called with the correct address i.e. the virtual address of the head
page.

Commit f227f0faf63b ("slub: fix unreclaimable slab stat for bulk free")
unified the free code paths for page allocator based slub allocations
but instead of using the address passed by the caller, it extracted the
address from the page. Thus making the unit test
kmalloc_pagealloc_invalid_free moot. So, fix this by using the address
passed by the caller.

Should we fix this? I think yes because dev expect kasan to catch these
type of programming bugs.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210802180819.1110165-1-shakeelb@google.com
Fixes: f227f0faf63b ("slub: fix unreclaimable slab stat for bulk free")
Signed-off-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Reported-by: Nathan Chancellor <nathan@kernel.org>
Tested-by: Nathan Chancellor <nathan@kernel.org>
Acked-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

340caf17 13-Aug-2021 Kuan-Ying Lee <Kuan-Ying.Lee@mediatek.com>

kasan, slub: reset tag when printing address

The address still includes the tags when it is printed. With hardware
tag-based kasan enabled, we will get a false positive KASAN issue when
we access metadata.

Reset the tag before we access the metadata.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210804090957.12393-3-Kuan-Ying.Lee@mediatek.com
Fixes: aa1ef4d7b3f6 ("kasan, mm: reset tags when accessing metadata")
Signed-off-by: Kuan-Ying Lee <Kuan-Ying.Lee@mediatek.com>
Reviewed-by: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrey Konovalov <andreyknvl@gmail.com>
Cc: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>
Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <ryabinin.a.a@gmail.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Chinwen Chang <chinwen.chang@mediatek.com>
Cc: Nicholas Tang <nicholas.tang@mediatek.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

6c7a00b8 13-Aug-2021 Kuan-Ying Lee <Kuan-Ying.Lee@mediatek.com>

kasan, kmemleak: reset tags when scanning block

Patch series "kasan, slub: reset tag when printing address", v3.

With hardware tag-based kasan enabled, we reset the tag when we access
metadata to avoid from false alarm.

This patch (of 2):

Kmemleak needs to scan kernel memory to check memory leak. With hardware
tag-based kasan enabled, when it scans on the invalid slab and
dereference, the issue will occur as below.

Hardware tag-based KASAN doesn't use compiler instrumentation, we can not
use kasan_disable_current() to ignore tag check.

Based on the below report, there are 11 0xf7 granules, which amounts to
176 bytes, and the object is allocated from the kmalloc-256 cache. So
when kmemleak accesses the last 256-176 bytes, it causes faults, as those
are marked with KASAN_KMALLOC_REDZONE == KASAN_TAG_INVALID == 0xfe.

Thus, we reset tags before accessing metadata to avoid from false positives.

BUG: KASAN: out-of-bounds in scan_block+0x58/0x170
Read at addr f7ff0000c0074eb0 by task kmemleak/138
Pointer tag: [f7], memory tag: [fe]

CPU: 7 PID: 138 Comm: kmemleak Not tainted 5.14.0-rc2-00001-g8cae8cd89f05-dirty #134
Hardware name: linux,dummy-virt (DT)
Call trace:
dump_backtrace+0x0/0x1b0
show_stack+0x1c/0x30
dump_stack_lvl+0x68/0x84
print_address_description+0x7c/0x2b4
kasan_report+0x138/0x38c
__do_kernel_fault+0x190/0x1c4
do_tag_check_fault+0x78/0x90
do_mem_abort+0x44/0xb4
el1_abort+0x40/0x60
el1h_64_sync_handler+0xb4/0xd0
el1h_64_sync+0x78/0x7c
scan_block+0x58/0x170
scan_gray_list+0xdc/0x1a0
kmemleak_scan+0x2ac/0x560
kmemleak_scan_thread+0xb0/0xe0
kthread+0x154/0x160
ret_from_fork+0x10/0x18

Allocated by task 0:
kasan_save_stack+0x2c/0x60
__kasan_kmalloc+0xec/0x104
__kmalloc+0x224/0x3c4
__register_sysctl_paths+0x200/0x290
register_sysctl_table+0x2c/0x40
sysctl_init+0x20/0x34
proc_sys_init+0x3c/0x48
proc_root_init+0x80/0x9c
start_kernel+0x648/0x6a4
__primary_switched+0xc0/0xc8

Freed by task 0:
kasan_save_stack+0x2c/0x60
kasan_set_track+0x2c/0x40
kasan_set_free_info+0x44/0x54
____kasan_slab_free.constprop.0+0x150/0x1b0
__kasan_slab_free+0x14/0x20
slab_free_freelist_hook+0xa4/0x1fc
kfree+0x1e8/0x30c
put_fs_context+0x124/0x220
vfs_kern_mount.part.0+0x60/0xd4
kern_mount+0x24/0x4c
bdev_cache_init+0x70/0x9c
vfs_caches_init+0xdc/0xf4
start_kernel+0x638/0x6a4
__primary_switched+0xc0/0xc8

The buggy address belongs to the object at ffff0000c0074e00
which belongs to the cache kmalloc-256 of size 256
The buggy address is located 176 bytes inside of
256-byte region [ffff0000c0074e00, ffff0000c0074f00)
The buggy address belongs to the page:
page:(____ptrval____) refcount:1 mapcount:0 mapping:0000000000000000 index:0x0 pfn:0x100074
head:(____ptrval____) order:2 compound_mapcount:0 compound_pincount:0
flags: 0xbfffc0000010200(slab|head|node=0|zone=2|lastcpupid=0xffff|kasantag=0x0)
raw: 0bfffc0000010200 0000000000000000 dead000000000122 f5ff0000c0002300
raw: 0000000000000000 0000000000200020 00000001ffffffff 0000000000000000
page dumped because: kasan: bad access detected

Memory state around the buggy address:
ffff0000c0074c00: f0 f0 f0 f0 f0 f0 f0 f0 f0 fe fe fe fe fe fe fe
ffff0000c0074d00: fe fe fe fe fe fe fe fe fe fe fe fe fe fe fe fe
>ffff0000c0074e00: f7 f7 f7 f7 f7 f7 f7 f7 f7 f7 f7 fe fe fe fe fe
^
ffff0000c0074f00: fe fe fe fe fe fe fe fe fe fe fe fe fe fe fe fe
ffff0000c0075000: fb fb fb fb fb fb fb fb fb fb fb fb fb fb fb fb
==================================================================
Disabling lock debugging due to kernel taint
kmemleak: 181 new suspected memory leaks (see /sys/kernel/debug/kmemleak)

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210804090957.12393-1-Kuan-Ying.Lee@mediatek.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210804090957.12393-2-Kuan-Ying.Lee@mediatek.com
Signed-off-by: Kuan-Ying Lee <Kuan-Ying.Lee@mediatek.com>
Acked-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrey Konovalov <andreyknvl@gmail.com>
Cc: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Cc: Nicholas Tang <nicholas.tang@mediatek.com>
Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <ryabinin.a.a@gmail.com>
Cc: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>
Cc: Chinwen Chang <chinwen.chang@mediatek.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

e888fa7b 11-Aug-2021 Geert Uytterhoeven <geert+renesas@glider.be>

memblock: Check memory add/cap ordering

For memblock_cap_memory_range() to work properly, it should be called
after memory is detected and added to memblock with memblock_add() or
memblock_add_node(). If memblock_cap_memory_range() would be called
before memory is registered, we may silently corrupt memory later
because the crash kernel will see all memory as available.

Print a warning and bail out if ordering is not satisfied.

Suggested-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert+renesas@glider.be>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/aabc5bad008d49f07d542815c6c8d28ec90bb09e.1628672091.git.geert+renesas@glider.be

00974b9a 11-Aug-2021 Geert Uytterhoeven <geert+renesas@glider.be>

memblock: Add missing debug code to memblock_add_node()

All other memblock APIs built on top of memblock_add_range() contain
debug code to print their parameters.

Signed-off-by: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert+renesas@glider.be>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/c45e5218b6fcf0e3aeb63d9a9d9792addae0bb7a.1628672041.git.geert+renesas@glider.be

de2860f4 09-Aug-2021 Dave Chinner <dchinner@redhat.com>

mm: Add kvrealloc()

During log recovery of an XFS filesystem with 64kB directory
buffers, rebuilding a buffer split across two log records results
in a memory allocation warning from krealloc like this:

xfs filesystem being mounted at /mnt/scratch supports timestamps until 2038 (0x7fffffff)
XFS (dm-0): Unmounting Filesystem
XFS (dm-0): Mounting V5 Filesystem
XFS (dm-0): Starting recovery (logdev: internal)
------------[ cut here ]------------
WARNING: CPU: 5 PID: 3435170 at mm/page_alloc.c:3539 get_page_from_freelist+0xdee/0xe40
.....
RIP: 0010:get_page_from_freelist+0xdee/0xe40
Call Trace:
? complete+0x3f/0x50
__alloc_pages+0x16f/0x300
alloc_pages+0x87/0x110
kmalloc_order+0x2c/0x90
kmalloc_order_trace+0x1d/0x90
__kmalloc_track_caller+0x215/0x270
? xlog_recover_add_to_cont_trans+0x63/0x1f0
krealloc+0x54/0xb0
xlog_recover_add_to_cont_trans+0x63/0x1f0
xlog_recovery_process_trans+0xc1/0xd0
xlog_recover_process_ophdr+0x86/0x130
xlog_recover_process_data+0x9f/0x160
xlog_recover_process+0xa2/0x120
xlog_do_recovery_pass+0x40b/0x7d0
? __irq_work_queue_local+0x4f/0x60
? irq_work_queue+0x3a/0x50
xlog_do_log_recovery+0x70/0x150
xlog_do_recover+0x38/0x1d0
xlog_recover+0xd8/0x170
xfs_log_mount+0x181/0x300
xfs_mountfs+0x4a1/0x9b0
xfs_fs_fill_super+0x3c0/0x7b0
get_tree_bdev+0x171/0x270
? suffix_kstrtoint.constprop.0+0xf0/0xf0
xfs_fs_get_tree+0x15/0x20
vfs_get_tree+0x24/0xc0
path_mount+0x2f5/0xaf0
__x64_sys_mount+0x108/0x140
do_syscall_64+0x3a/0x70
entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xae

Essentially, we are taking a multi-order allocation from kmem_alloc()
(which has an open coded no fail, no warn loop) and then
reallocating it out to 64kB using krealloc(__GFP_NOFAIL) and that is
then triggering the above warning.

This is a regression caused by converting this code from an open
coded no fail/no warn reallocation loop to using __GFP_NOFAIL.

What we actually need here is kvrealloc(), so that if contiguous
page allocation fails we fall back to vmalloc() and we don't
get nasty warnings happening in XFS.

Fixes: 771915c4f688 ("xfs: remove kmem_realloc()")
Signed-off-by: Dave Chinner <dchinner@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Reviewed-by: Darrick J. Wong <djwong@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Darrick J. Wong <djwong@kernel.org>

5ed964f8 09-Aug-2021 Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>

mm: hide laptop_mode_wb_timer entirely behind the BDI API

Don't leak the detaіls of the timer into the block layer, instead
initialize the timer in bdi_alloc and delete it in bdi_unregister.
Note that this means the timer is initialized (but not armed) for
non-block queues as well now.

Signed-off-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Reviewed-by: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Reviewed-by: Johannes Thumshirn <johannes.thumshirn@wdc.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20210809141744.1203023-2-hch@lst.de
Signed-off-by: Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk>

76721503 14-Jul-2021 Mark Rutland <mark.rutland@arm.com>

arm64: kasan: mte: remove redundant mte_report_once logic

We have special logic to suppress MTE tag check fault reporting, based
on a global `mte_report_once` and `reported` variables. These can be
used to suppress calling kasan_report() when taking a tag check fault,
but do not prevent taking the fault in the first place, nor does they
affect the way we disable tag checks upon taking a fault.

The core KASAN code already defaults to reporting a single fault, and
has a `multi_shot` control to permit reporting multiple faults. The only
place we transiently alter `mte_report_once` is in lib/test_kasan.c,
where we also the `multi_shot` state as the same time. Thus
`mte_report_once` and `reported` are redundant, and can be removed.

When a tag check fault is taken, tag checking will be disabled by
`do_tag_recovery` and must be explicitly re-enabled if desired. The test
code does this by calling kasan_enable_tagging_sync().

This patch removes the redundant mte_report_once() logic and associated
variables.

Signed-off-by: Mark Rutland <mark.rutland@arm.com>
Cc: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>
Cc: Andrey Konovalov <andreyknvl@gmail.com>
Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <ryabinin.a.a@gmail.com>
Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Cc: Vincenzo Frascino <vincenzo.frascino@arm.com>
Reviewed-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrey Konovalov <andreyknvl@gmail.com>
Tested-by: Andrey Konovalov <andreyknvl@gmail.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20210714143843.56537-4-mark.rutland@arm.com
Signed-off-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>

82868247 14-Jul-2021 Mark Rutland <mark.rutland@arm.com>

arm64: kasan: mte: use a constant kernel GCR_EL1 value

When KASAN_HW_TAGS is selected, KASAN is enabled at boot time, and the
hardware supports MTE, we'll initialize `kernel_gcr_excl` with a value
dependent on KASAN_TAG_MAX. While the resulting value is a constant
which depends on KASAN_TAG_MAX, we have to perform some runtime work to
generate the value, and have to read the value from memory during the
exception entry path. It would be better if we could generate this as a
constant at compile-time, and use it as such directly.

Early in boot within __cpu_setup(), we initialize GCR_EL1 to a safe
value, and later override this with the value required by KASAN. If
CONFIG_KASAN_HW_TAGS is not selected, or if KASAN is disabeld at boot
time, the kernel will not use IRG instructions, and so the initial value
of GCR_EL1 is does not matter to the kernel. Thus, we can instead have
__cpu_setup() initialize GCR_EL1 to a value consistent with
KASAN_TAG_MAX, and avoid the need to re-initialize it during hotplug and
resume form suspend.

This patch makes arem64 use a compile-time constant KERNEL_GCR_EL1
value, which is compatible with KASAN_HW_TAGS when this is selected.
This removes the need to re-initialize GCR_EL1 dynamically, and acts as
an optimization to the entry assembly, which no longer needs to load
this value from memory. The redundant initialization hooks are removed.

In order to do this, KASAN_TAG_MAX needs to be visible outside of the
core KASAN code. To do this, I've moved the KASAN_TAG_* values into
<linux/kasan-tags.h>.

There should be no functional change as a result of this patch.

Signed-off-by: Mark Rutland <mark.rutland@arm.com>
Cc: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>
Cc: Andrey Konovalov <andreyknvl@gmail.com>
Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <ryabinin.a.a@gmail.com>
Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com>
Cc: Peter Collingbourne <pcc@google.com>
Cc: Vincenzo Frascino <vincenzo.frascino@arm.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Reviewed-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrey Konovalov <andreyknvl@gmail.com>
Tested-by: Andrey Konovalov <andreyknvl@gmail.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20210714143843.56537-3-mark.rutland@arm.com
Signed-off-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>

d2e11fd2 31-Jul-2021 Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>

Merge git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/netdev/net

Conflicting commits, all resolutions pretty trivial:

drivers/bus/mhi/pci_generic.c
5c2c85315948 ("bus: mhi: pci-generic: configurable network interface MRU")
56f6f4c4eb2a ("bus: mhi: pci_generic: Apply no-op for wake using sideband wake boolean")

drivers/nfc/s3fwrn5/firmware.c
a0302ff5906a ("nfc: s3fwrn5: remove unnecessary label")
46573e3ab08f ("nfc: s3fwrn5: fix undefined parameter values in dev_err()")
801e541c79bb ("nfc: s3fwrn5: fix undefined parameter values in dev_err()")

MAINTAINERS
7d901a1e878a ("net: phy: add Maxlinear GPY115/21x/24x driver")
8a7b46fa7902 ("MAINTAINERS: add Yasushi SHOJI as reviewer for the Microchip CAN BUS Analyzer Tool driver")

Signed-off-by: Jakub Kicinski <kuba@kernel.org>


121dffe2 29-Jul-2021 Wang Hai <wanghai38@huawei.com>

mm/memcg: fix NULL pointer dereference in memcg_slab_free_hook()

When I use kfree_rcu() to free a large memory allocated by kmalloc_node(),
the following dump occurs.

BUG: kernel NULL pointer dereference, address: 0000000000000020
[...]
Oops: 0000 [#1] SMP
[...]
Workqueue: events kfree_rcu_work
RIP: 0010:__obj_to_index include/linux/slub_def.h:182 [inline]
RIP: 0010:obj_to_index include/linux/slub_def.h:191 [inline]
RIP: 0010:memcg_slab_free_hook+0x120/0x260 mm/slab.h:363
[...]
Call Trace:
kmem_cache_free_bulk+0x58/0x630 mm/slub.c:3293
kfree_bulk include/linux/slab.h:413 [inline]
kfree_rcu_work+0x1ab/0x200 kernel/rcu/tree.c:3300
process_one_work+0x207/0x530 kernel/workqueue.c:2276
worker_thread+0x320/0x610 kernel/workqueue.c:2422
kthread+0x13d/0x160 kernel/kthread.c:313
ret_from_fork+0x1f/0x30 arch/x86/entry/entry_64.S:294

When kmalloc_node() a large memory, page is allocated, not slab, so when
freeing memory via kfree_rcu(), this large memory should not be used by
memcg_slab_free_hook(), because memcg_slab_free_hook() is is used for
slab.

Using page_objcgs_check() instead of page_objcgs() in
memcg_slab_free_hook() to fix this bug.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210728145655.274476-1-wanghai38@huawei.com
Fixes: 270c6a71460e ("mm: memcontrol/slab: Use helpers to access slab page's memcg_data")
Signed-off-by: Wang Hai <wanghai38@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Acked-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Reviewed-by: Kefeng Wang <wangkefeng.wang@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Alexei Starovoitov <ast@kernel.org>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

f227f0fa 29-Jul-2021 Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>

slub: fix unreclaimable slab stat for bulk free

SLUB uses page allocator for higher order allocations and update
unreclaimable slab stat for such allocations. At the moment, the bulk
free for SLUB does not share code with normal free code path for these
type of allocations and have missed the stat update. So, fix the stat
update by common code. The user visible impact of the bug is the
potential of inconsistent unreclaimable slab stat visible through
meminfo and vmstat.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210728155354.3440560-1-shakeelb@google.com
Fixes: 6a486c0ad4dc ("mm, sl[ou]b: improve memory accounting")
Signed-off-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Acked-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Reviewed-by: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

b5916c02 29-Jul-2021 Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>

mm/migrate: fix NR_ISOLATED corruption on 64-bit

Similar to commit 2da9f6305f30 ("mm/vmscan: fix NR_ISOLATED_FILE
corruption on 64-bit") avoid using unsigned int for nr_pages. With
unsigned int type the large unsigned int converts to a large positive
signed long.

Symptoms include CMA allocations hanging forever due to
alloc_contig_range->...->isolate_migratepages_block waiting forever in
"while (unlikely(too_many_isolated(pgdat)))".

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210728042531.359409-1-aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com
Fixes: c5fc5c3ae0c8 ("mm: migrate: account THP NUMA migration counters correctly")
Signed-off-by: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Reported-by: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Reported-by: Alexey Kardashevskiy <aik@ozlabs.ru>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

30def935 29-Jul-2021 Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>

mm: memcontrol: fix blocking rstat function called from atomic cgroup1 thresholding code

Dan Carpenter reports:

The patch 2d146aa3aa84: "mm: memcontrol: switch to rstat" from Apr
29, 2021, leads to the following static checker warning:

kernel/cgroup/rstat.c:200 cgroup_rstat_flush()
warn: sleeping in atomic context

mm/memcontrol.c
3572 static unsigned long mem_cgroup_usage(struct mem_cgroup *memcg, bool swap)
3573 {
3574 unsigned long val;
3575
3576 if (mem_cgroup_is_root(memcg)) {
3577 cgroup_rstat_flush(memcg->css.cgroup);
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

This is from static analysis and potentially a false positive. The
problem is that mem_cgroup_usage() is called from __mem_cgroup_threshold()
which holds an rcu_read_lock(). And the cgroup_rstat_flush() function
can sleep.

3578 val = memcg_page_state(memcg, NR_FILE_PAGES) +
3579 memcg_page_state(memcg, NR_ANON_MAPPED);
3580 if (swap)
3581 val += memcg_page_state(memcg, MEMCG_SWAP);
3582 } else {
3583 if (!swap)
3584 val = page_counter_read(&memcg->memory);
3585 else
3586 val = page_counter_read(&memcg->memsw);
3587 }
3588 return val;
3589 }

__mem_cgroup_threshold() indeed holds the rcu lock. In addition, the
thresholding code is invoked during stat changes, and those contexts
have irqs disabled as well. If the lock breaking occurs inside the
flush function, it will result in a sleep from an atomic context.

Use the irqsafe flushing variant in mem_cgroup_usage() to fix this.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210726150019.251820-1-hannes@cmpxchg.org
Fixes: 2d146aa3aa84 ("mm: memcontrol: switch to rstat")
Signed-off-by: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Reported-by: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Acked-by: Chris Down <chris@chrisdown.name>
Reviewed-by: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Reviewed-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

f99e12b2 28-Jul-2021 Sven Schnelle <svens@linux.ibm.com>

kfence: add function to mask address bits

s390 only reports the page address during a translation fault.
To make the kfence unit tests pass, add a function that might
be implemented by architectures to mask out address bits.

Signed-off-by: Sven Schnelle <svens@linux.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20210728190254.3921642-3-hca@linux.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <hca@linux.ibm.com>

e4dc3489 23-Jul-2021 Qi Zheng <zhengqi.arch@bytedance.com>

mm: fix the deadlock in finish_fault()

Commit 63f3655f9501 ("mm, memcg: fix reclaim deadlock with writeback")
fix the following ABBA deadlock by pre-allocating the pte page table
without holding the page lock.

lock_page(A)
SetPageWriteback(A)
unlock_page(A)
lock_page(B)
lock_page(B)
pte_alloc_one
shrink_page_list
wait_on_page_writeback(A)
SetPageWriteback(B)
unlock_page(B)

# flush A, B to clear the writeback

Commit f9ce0be71d1f ("mm: Cleanup faultaround and finish_fault()
codepaths") reworked the relevant code but ignored this race. This will
cause the deadlock above to appear again, so fix it.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210721074849.57004-1-zhengqi.arch@bytedance.com
Fixes: f9ce0be71d1f ("mm: Cleanup faultaround and finish_fault() codepaths")
Signed-off-by: Qi Zheng <zhengqi.arch@bytedance.com>
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Vladimir Davydov <vdavydov.dev@gmail.com>
Cc: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

e904c2cc 23-Jul-2021 Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>

mm: mmap_lock: fix disabling preemption directly

Commit 832b50725373 ("mm: mmap_lock: use local locks instead of
disabling preemption") fixed a bug by using local locks.

But commit d01079f3d0c0 ("mm/mmap_lock: remove dead code for
!CONFIG_TRACING configurations") changed those lines back to the
original version.

I guess it was introduced by fixing conflicts.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210720074228.76342-1-songmuchun@bytedance.com
Fixes: d01079f3d0c0 ("mm/mmap_lock: remove dead code for !CONFIG_TRACING configurations")
Signed-off-by: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Pankaj Gupta <pankaj.gupta@ionos.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

af642374 23-Jul-2021 Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>

mm/secretmem: wire up ->set_page_dirty

Make secretmem up to date with the changes done in commit 0af573780b0b
("mm: require ->set_page_dirty to be explicitly wired up") so that
unconditional call to this method won't cause crashes.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210716063933.31633-1-rppt@kernel.org
Fixes: 0af573780b0b ("mm: require ->set_page_dirty to be explicitly wired up")
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

b43a9e76 23-Jul-2021 Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>

writeback, cgroup: remove wb from offline list before releasing refcnt

Boyang reported that the commit c22d70a162d3 ("writeback, cgroup:
release dying cgwbs by switching attached inodes") causes the kernel to
crash while running xfstests generic/256 on ext4 on aarch64 and ppc64le.

run fstests generic/256 at 2021-07-12 05:41:40
EXT4-fs (vda3): mounted filesystem with ordered data mode. Opts: . Quota mode: none.
Unable to handle kernel NULL pointer dereference at virtual address 0000000000000000
Mem abort info:
ESR = 0x96000005
EC = 0x25: DABT (current EL), IL = 32 bits
SET = 0, FnV = 0
EA = 0, S1PTW = 0
FSC = 0x05: level 1 translation fault
Data abort info:
ISV = 0, ISS = 0x00000005
CM = 0, WnR = 0
user pgtable: 64k pages, 48-bit VAs, pgdp=00000000b0502000
[0000000000000000] pgd=0000000000000000, p4d=0000000000000000, pud=0000000000000000
Internal error: Oops: 96000005 [#1] SMP
Modules linked in: dm_flakey dm_snapshot dm_bufio dm_zero dm_mod loop tls rpcsec_gss_krb5 auth_rpcgss nfsv4 dns_resolver nfs lockd grace fscache netfs rfkill sunrpc ext4 vfat fat mbcache jbd2 drm fuse xfs libcrc32c crct10dif_ce ghash_ce sha2_ce sha256_arm64 sha1_ce virtio_blk virtio_net net_failover virtio_console failover virtio_mmio aes_neon_bs [last unloaded: scsi_debug]
CPU: 0 PID: 408468 Comm: kworker/u8:5 Tainted: G X --------- --- 5.14.0-0.rc1.15.bx.el9.aarch64 #1
Hardware name: QEMU KVM Virtual Machine, BIOS 0.0.0 02/06/2015
Workqueue: events_unbound cleanup_offline_cgwbs_workfn
pstate: 004000c5 (nzcv daIF +PAN -UAO -TCO BTYPE=--)
pc : cleanup_offline_cgwbs_workfn+0x320/0x394
lr : cleanup_offline_cgwbs_workfn+0xe0/0x394
sp : ffff80001554fd10
x29: ffff80001554fd10 x28: 0000000000000000 x27: 0000000000000001
x26: 0000000000000000 x25: 00000000000000e0 x24: ffffd2a2fbe671a8
x23: ffff80001554fd88 x22: ffffd2a2fbe67198 x21: ffffd2a2fc25a730
x20: ffff210412bc3000 x19: ffff210412bc3280 x18: 0000000000000000
x17: 0000000000000000 x16: 0000000000000000 x15: 0000000000000000
x14: 0000000000000000 x13: 0000000000000030 x12: 0000000000000040
x11: ffff210481572238 x10: ffff21048157223a x9 : ffffd2a2fa276c60
x8 : ffff210484106b60 x7 : 0000000000000000 x6 : 000000000007d18a
x5 : ffff210416a86400 x4 : ffff210412bc0280 x3 : 0000000000000000
x2 : ffff80001554fd88 x1 : ffff210412bc0280 x0 : 0000000000000003
Call trace:
cleanup_offline_cgwbs_workfn+0x320/0x394
process_one_work+0x1f4/0x4b0
worker_thread+0x184/0x540
kthread+0x114/0x120
ret_from_fork+0x10/0x18
Code: d63f0020 97f99963 17ffffa6 f8588263 (f9400061)
---[ end trace e250fe289272792a ]---
Kernel panic - not syncing: Oops: Fatal exception
SMP: stopping secondary CPUs
SMP: failed to stop secondary CPUs 0-2
Kernel Offset: 0x52a2e9fa0000 from 0xffff800010000000
PHYS_OFFSET: 0xfff0defca0000000
CPU features: 0x00200251,23200840
Memory Limit: none
---[ end Kernel panic - not syncing: Oops: Fatal exception ]---

The problem happens when cgwb_release_workfn() races with
cleanup_offline_cgwbs_workfn(): wb_tryget() in
cleanup_offline_cgwbs_workfn() can be called after percpu_ref_exit() is
cgwb_release_workfn(), which is basically a use-after-free error.

Fix the problem by making removing the writeback structure from the
offline list before releasing the percpu reference counter. It will
guarantee that cleanup_offline_cgwbs_workfn() will not see and not
access writeback structures which are about to be released.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210716201039.3762203-1-guro@fb.com
Fixes: c22d70a162d3 ("writeback, cgroup: release dying cgwbs by switching attached inodes")
Signed-off-by: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Reported-by: Boyang Xue <bxue@redhat.com>
Suggested-by: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Tested-by: Darrick J. Wong <djwong@kernel.org>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Cc: Dave Chinner <dchinner@redhat.com>
Cc: Murphy Zhou <jencce.kernel@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

79e482e9 23-Jul-2021 Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>

memblock: make for_each_mem_range() traverse MEMBLOCK_HOTPLUG regions

Commit b10d6bca8720 ("arch, drivers: replace for_each_membock() with
for_each_mem_range()") didn't take into account that when there is
movable_node parameter in the kernel command line, for_each_mem_range()
would skip ranges marked with MEMBLOCK_HOTPLUG.

The page table setup code in POWER uses for_each_mem_range() to create
the linear mapping of the physical memory and since the regions marked
as MEMORY_HOTPLUG are skipped, they never make it to the linear map.

A later access to the memory in those ranges will fail:

BUG: Unable to handle kernel data access on write at 0xc000000400000000
Faulting instruction address: 0xc00000000008a3c0
Oops: Kernel access of bad area, sig: 11 [#1]
LE PAGE_SIZE=64K MMU=Radix SMP NR_CPUS=2048 NUMA pSeries
Modules linked in:
CPU: 0 PID: 53 Comm: kworker/u2:0 Not tainted 5.13.0 #7
NIP: c00000000008a3c0 LR: c0000000003c1ed8 CTR: 0000000000000040
REGS: c000000008a57770 TRAP: 0300 Not tainted (5.13.0)
MSR: 8000000002009033 <SF,VEC,EE,ME,IR,DR,RI,LE> CR: 84222202 XER: 20040000
CFAR: c0000000003c1ed4 DAR: c000000400000000 DSISR: 42000000 IRQMASK: 0
GPR00: c0000000003c1ed8 c000000008a57a10 c0000000019da700 c000000400000000
GPR04: 0000000000000280 0000000000000180 0000000000000400 0000000000000200
GPR08: 0000000000000100 0000000000000080 0000000000000040 0000000000000300
GPR12: 0000000000000380 c000000001bc0000 c0000000001660c8 c000000006337e00
GPR16: 0000000000000000 0000000000000000 0000000000000000 0000000000000000
GPR20: 0000000040000000 0000000020000000 c000000001a81990 c000000008c30000
GPR24: c000000008c20000 c000000001a81998 000fffffffff0000 c000000001a819a0
GPR28: c000000001a81908 c00c000001000000 c000000008c40000 c000000008a64680
NIP clear_user_page+0x50/0x80
LR __handle_mm_fault+0xc88/0x1910
Call Trace:
__handle_mm_fault+0xc44/0x1910 (unreliable)
handle_mm_fault+0x130/0x2a0
__get_user_pages+0x248/0x610
__get_user_pages_remote+0x12c/0x3e0
get_arg_page+0x54/0xf0
copy_string_kernel+0x11c/0x210
kernel_execve+0x16c/0x220
call_usermodehelper_exec_async+0x1b0/0x2f0
ret_from_kernel_thread+0x5c/0x70
Instruction dump:
79280fa4 79271764 79261f24 794ae8e2 7ca94214 7d683a14 7c893a14 7d893050
7d4903a6 60000000 60000000 60000000 <7c001fec> 7c091fec 7c081fec 7c051fec
---[ end trace 490b8c67e6075e09 ]---

Making for_each_mem_range() include MEMBLOCK_HOTPLUG regions in the
traversal fixes this issue.

Link: https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1976100
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210712071132.20902-1-rppt@kernel.org
Fixes: b10d6bca8720 ("arch, drivers: replace for_each_membock() with for_each_mem_range()")
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Tested-by: Greg Kurz <groug@kaod.org>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org> [5.10+]
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

69e5d322 23-Jul-2021 Sergei Trofimovich <slyfox@gentoo.org>

mm: page_alloc: fix page_poison=1 / INIT_ON_ALLOC_DEFAULT_ON interaction

To reproduce the failure we need the following system:

- kernel command: page_poison=1 init_on_free=0 init_on_alloc=0

- kernel config:
* CONFIG_INIT_ON_ALLOC_DEFAULT_ON=y
* CONFIG_INIT_ON_FREE_DEFAULT_ON=y
* CONFIG_PAGE_POISONING=y

Resulting in:

0000000085629bdd: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 ................
0000000022861832: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 ................
00000000c597f5b0: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 ................
CPU: 11 PID: 15195 Comm: bash Kdump: loaded Tainted: G U O 5.13.1-gentoo-x86_64 #1
Hardware name: System manufacturer System Product Name/PRIME Z370-A, BIOS 2801 01/13/2021
Call Trace:
dump_stack+0x64/0x7c
__kernel_unpoison_pages.cold+0x48/0x84
post_alloc_hook+0x60/0xa0
get_page_from_freelist+0xdb8/0x1000
__alloc_pages+0x163/0x2b0
__get_free_pages+0xc/0x30
pgd_alloc+0x2e/0x1a0
mm_init+0x185/0x270
dup_mm+0x6b/0x4f0
copy_process+0x190d/0x1b10
kernel_clone+0xba/0x3b0
__do_sys_clone+0x8f/0xb0
do_syscall_64+0x68/0x80
entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xae

Before commit 51cba1ebc60d ("init_on_alloc: Optimize static branches")
init_on_alloc never enabled static branch by default. It could only be
enabed explicitly by init_mem_debugging_and_hardening().

But after commit 51cba1ebc60d, a static branch could already be enabled
by default. There was no code to ever disable it. That caused
page_poison=1 / init_on_free=1 conflict.

This change extends init_mem_debugging_and_hardening() to also disable
static branch disabling.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210714031935.4094114-1-keescook@chromium.org
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20210712215816.1512739-1-slyfox@gentoo.org
Fixes: 51cba1ebc60d ("init_on_alloc: Optimize static branches")
Signed-off-by: Sergei Trofimovich <slyfox@gentoo.org>
Signed-off-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Co-developed-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
Reported-by: Mikhail Morfikov <mmorfikov@gmail.com>
Reported-by: <bowsingbetee@pm.me>
Tested-by: <bowsingbetee@protonmail.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

236e9f15 23-Jul-2021 Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>

kfence: skip all GFP_ZONEMASK allocations

Allocation requests outside ZONE_NORMAL (MOVABLE, HIGHMEM or DMA) cannot
be fulfilled by KFENCE, because KFENCE memory pool is located in a zone
different from the requested one.

Because callers of kmem_cache_alloc() may actually rely on the
allocation to reside in the requested zone (e.g. memory allocations
done with __GFP_DMA must be DMAable), skip all allocations done with
GFP_ZONEMASK and/or respective SLAB flags (SLAB_CACHE_DMA and
SLAB_CACHE_DMA32).

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210714092222.1890268-2-glider@google.com
Fixes: 0ce20dd84089 ("mm: add Kernel Electric-Fence infrastructure")
Signed-off-by: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Acked-by: Souptick Joarder <jrdr.linux@gmail.com>
Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Cc: Souptick Joarder <jrdr.linux@gmail.com>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org> [5.12+]
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

235a85cb 23-Jul-2021 Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>

kfence: move the size check to the beginning of __kfence_alloc()

Check the allocation size before toggling kfence_allocation_gate.

This way allocations that can't be served by KFENCE will not result in
waiting for another CONFIG_KFENCE_SAMPLE_INTERVAL without allocating
anything.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210714092222.1890268-1-glider@google.com
Signed-off-by: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>
Suggested-by: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com>
Cc: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org> [5.12+]
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

32ae8a06 23-Jul-2021 Weizhao Ouyang <o451686892@gmail.com>

kfence: defer kfence_test_init to ensure that kunit debugfs is created

kfence_test_init and kunit_init both use the same level late_initcall,
which means if kfence_test_init linked ahead of kunit_init,
kfence_test_init will get a NULL debugfs_rootdir as parent dentry, then
kfence_test_init and kfence_debugfs_init both create a debugfs node
named "kfence" under debugfs_mount->mnt_root, and it will throw out
"debugfs: Directory 'kfence' with parent '/' already present!" with
EEXIST. So kfence_test_init should be deferred.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210714113140.2949995-1-o451686892@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Weizhao Ouyang <o451686892@gmail.com>
Tested-by: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Cc: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>
Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

5af84df9 23-Jul-2021 David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>

Merge git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/netdev/net

Conflicts are simple overlapping changes.

Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>


6126891c 19-Jul-2021 Vasily Averin <vvs@virtuozzo.com>

memcg: enable accounting for IP address and routing-related objects

An netadmin inside container can use 'ip a a' and 'ip r a'
to assign a large number of ipv4/ipv6 addresses and routing entries
and force kernel to allocate megabytes of unaccounted memory
for long-lived per-netdevice related kernel objects:
'struct in_ifaddr', 'struct inet6_ifaddr', 'struct fib6_node',
'struct rt6_info', 'struct fib_rules' and ip_fib caches.

These objects can be manually removed, though usually they lives
in memory till destroy of its net namespace.

It makes sense to account for them to restrict the host's memory
consumption from inside the memcg-limited container.

One of such objects is the 'struct fib6_node' mostly allocated in
net/ipv6/route.c::__ip6_ins_rt() inside the lock_bh()/unlock_bh() section:

write_lock_bh(&table->tb6_lock);
err = fib6_add(&table->tb6_root, rt, info, mxc);
write_unlock_bh(&table->tb6_lock);

In this case it is not enough to simply add SLAB_ACCOUNT to corresponding
kmem cache. The proper memory cgroup still cannot be found due to the
incorrect 'in_interrupt()' check used in memcg_kmem_bypass().

Obsoleted in_interrupt() does not describe real execution context properly.
>From include/linux/preempt.h:

The following macros are deprecated and should not be used in new code:
in_interrupt() - We're in NMI,IRQ,SoftIRQ context or have BH disabled

To verify the current execution context new macro should be used instead:
in_task() - We're in task context

Signed-off-by: Vasily Averin <vvs@virtuozzo.com>
Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>

ae14c63a 17-Jul-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Revert "mm/slub: use stackdepot to save stack trace in objects"

This reverts commit 788691464c29455346dc613a3b43c2fb9e5757a4.

It's not clear why, but it causes unexplained problems in entirely
unrelated xfs code. The most likely explanation is some slab
corruption, possibly triggered due to CONFIG_SLUB_DEBUG_ON. See [1].

It ends up having a few other problems too, like build errors on
arch/arc, and Geert reporting it using much more memory on m68k [3] (it
probably does so elsewhere too, but it is probably just more noticeable
on m68k).

The architecture issues (both build and memory use) are likely just
because this change effectively force-enabled STACKDEPOT (along with a
very bad default value for the stackdepot hash size). But together with
the xfs issue, this all smells like "this commit was not ready" to me.

Link: https://lore.kernel.org/linux-xfs/YPE3l82acwgI2OiV@infradead.org/ [1]
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/202107150600.LkGNb4Vb-lkp@intel.com/ [2]
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/CAMuHMdW=eoVzM1Re5FVoEN87nKfiLmM2+Ah7eNu2KXEhCvbZyA@mail.gmail.com/ [3]
Reported-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org>
Reported-by: kernel test robot <lkp@intel.com>
Reported-by: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org>
Cc: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

d08af0a5 14-Jul-2021 Joao Martins <joao.m.martins@oracle.com>

mm/hugetlb: fix refs calculation from unaligned @vaddr

Commit 82e5d378b0e47 ("mm/hugetlb: refactor subpage recording")
refactored the count of subpages but missed an edge case when @vaddr is
not aligned to PAGE_SIZE e.g. when close to vma->vm_end. It would then
errousnly set @refs to 0 and record_subpages_vmas() wouldn't set the
@pages array element to its value, consequently causing the reported
null-deref by syzbot.

Fix it by aligning down @vaddr by PAGE_SIZE in @refs calculation.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210713152440.28650-1-joao.m.martins@oracle.com
Fixes: 82e5d378b0e47 ("mm/hugetlb: refactor subpage recording")
Reported-by: syzbot+a3fcd59df1b372066f5a@syzkaller.appspotmail.com
Signed-off-by: Joao Martins <joao.m.martins@oracle.com>
Reviewed-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

06147843 14-Jul-2021 Chuck Lever <chuck.lever@oracle.com>

mm/page_alloc: further fix __alloc_pages_bulk() return value

The author of commit b3b64ebd3822 ("mm/page_alloc: do bulk array
bounds check after checking populated elements") was possibly
confused by the mixture of return values throughout the function.

The API contract is clear that the function "Returns the number of pages
on the list or array." It does not list zero as a unique return value with
a special meaning. Therefore zero is a plausible return value only if
@nr_pages is zero or less.

Clean up the return logic to make it clear that the returned value is
always the total number of pages in the array/list, not the number of
pages that were allocated during this call.

The only change in behavior with this patch is the value returned if
prepare_alloc_pages() fails. To match the API contract, the number of
pages currently in the array/list is returned in this case.

The call site in __page_pool_alloc_pages_slow() also seems to be confused
on this matter. It should be attended to by someone who is familiar with
that code.

[mel@techsingularity.net: Return nr_populated if 0 pages are requested]

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210713152100.10381-4-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Chuck Lever <chuck.lever@oracle.com>
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Jesper Dangaard Brouer <brouer@redhat.com>
Cc: Desmond Cheong Zhi Xi <desmondcheongzx@gmail.com>
Cc: Zhang Qiang <Qiang.Zhang@windriver.com>
Cc: Yanfei Xu <yanfei.xu@windriver.com>
Cc: Matteo Croce <mcroce@microsoft.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

e5c15cea 14-Jul-2021 Yanfei Xu <yanfei.xu@windriver.com>

mm/page_alloc: correct return value when failing at preparing

If the array passed in is already partially populated, we should return
"nr_populated" even failing at preparing arguments stage.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210713152100.10381-3-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Yanfei Xu <yanfei.xu@windriver.com>
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20210709102855.55058-1-yanfei.xu@windriver.com
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

187ad460 14-Jul-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/page_alloc: avoid page allocator recursion with pagesets.lock held

Syzbot is reporting potential deadlocks due to pagesets.lock when
PAGE_OWNER is enabled. One example from Desmond Cheong Zhi Xi is as
follows

__alloc_pages_bulk()
local_lock_irqsave(&pagesets.lock, flags) <---- outer lock here
prep_new_page():
post_alloc_hook():
set_page_owner():
__set_page_owner():
save_stack():
stack_depot_save():
alloc_pages():
alloc_page_interleave():
__alloc_pages():
get_page_from_freelist():
rm_queue():
rm_queue_pcplist():
local_lock_irqsave(&pagesets.lock, flags);
*** DEADLOCK ***

Zhang, Qiang also reported

BUG: sleeping function called from invalid context at mm/page_alloc.c:5179
in_atomic(): 0, irqs_disabled(): 1, non_block: 0, pid: 1, name: swapper/0
.....
__dump_stack lib/dump_stack.c:79 [inline]
dump_stack_lvl+0xcd/0x134 lib/dump_stack.c:96
___might_sleep.cold+0x1f1/0x237 kernel/sched/core.c:9153
prepare_alloc_pages+0x3da/0x580 mm/page_alloc.c:5179
__alloc_pages+0x12f/0x500 mm/page_alloc.c:5375
alloc_page_interleave+0x1e/0x200 mm/mempolicy.c:2147
alloc_pages+0x238/0x2a0 mm/mempolicy.c:2270
stack_depot_save+0x39d/0x4e0 lib/stackdepot.c:303
save_stack+0x15e/0x1e0 mm/page_owner.c:120
__set_page_owner+0x50/0x290 mm/page_owner.c:181
prep_new_page mm/page_alloc.c:2445 [inline]
__alloc_pages_bulk+0x8b9/0x1870 mm/page_alloc.c:5313
alloc_pages_bulk_array_node include/linux/gfp.h:557 [inline]
vm_area_alloc_pages mm/vmalloc.c:2775 [inline]
__vmalloc_area_node mm/vmalloc.c:2845 [inline]
__vmalloc_node_range+0x39d/0x960 mm/vmalloc.c:2947
__vmalloc_node mm/vmalloc.c:2996 [inline]
vzalloc+0x67/0x80 mm/vmalloc.c:3066

There are a number of ways it could be fixed. The page owner code could
be audited to strip GFP flags that allow sleeping but it'll impair the
functionality of PAGE_OWNER if allocations fail. The bulk allocator could
add a special case to release/reacquire the lock for prep_new_page and
lookup PCP after the lock is reacquired at the cost of performance. The
pages requiring prep could be tracked using the least significant bit and
looping through the array although it is more complicated for the list
interface. The options are relatively complex and the second one still
incurs a performance penalty when PAGE_OWNER is active so this patch takes
the simple approach -- disable bulk allocation of PAGE_OWNER is active.
The caller will be forced to allocate one page at a time incurring a
performance penalty but PAGE_OWNER is already a performance penalty.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210708081434.GV3840@techsingularity.net
Fixes: dbbee9d5cd83 ("mm/page_alloc: convert per-cpu list protection to local_lock")
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Reported-by: Desmond Cheong Zhi Xi <desmondcheongzx@gmail.com>
Reported-by: "Zhang, Qiang" <Qiang.Zhang@windriver.com>
Reported-by: syzbot+127fd7828d6eeb611703@syzkaller.appspotmail.com
Tested-by: syzbot+127fd7828d6eeb611703@syzkaller.appspotmail.com
Acked-by: Rafael Aquini <aquini@redhat.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <skhan@linuxfoundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

54aa3866 14-Jul-2021 Matteo Croce <mcroce@microsoft.com>

Revert "mm/page_alloc: make should_fail_alloc_page() static"

This reverts commit f7173090033c70886d925995e9dfdfb76dbb2441.

Fix an unresolved symbol error when CONFIG_DEBUG_INFO_BTF=y:

LD vmlinux
BTFIDS vmlinux
FAILED unresolved symbol should_fail_alloc_page
make: *** [Makefile:1199: vmlinux] Error 255
make: *** Deleting file 'vmlinux'

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210708191128.153796-1-mcroce@linux.microsoft.com
Fixes: f7173090033c ("mm/page_alloc: make should_fail_alloc_page() static")
Signed-off-by: Matteo Croce <mcroce@microsoft.com>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Tested-by: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Dan Streetman <ddstreet@ieee.org>
Cc: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

77a63c69 14-Jul-2021 Yee Lee <yee.lee@mediatek.com>

kasan: add memzero init for unaligned size at DEBUG

Issue: when SLUB debug is on, hwtag kasan_unpoison() would overwrite the
redzone of object with unaligned size.

An additional memzero_explicit() path is added to replacing init by hwtag
instruction for those unaligned size at SLUB debug mode.

The penalty is acceptable since they are only enabled in debug mode, not
production builds. A block of comment is added for explanation.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210705103229.8505-3-yee.lee@mediatek.com
Signed-off-by: Yee Lee <yee.lee@mediatek.com>
Suggested-by: Andrey Konovalov <andreyknvl@gmail.com>
Suggested-by: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrey Konovalov <andreyknvl@gmail.com>
Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <ryabinin.a.a@gmail.com>
Cc: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>
Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com>
Cc: Nicholas Tang <nicholas.tang@mediatek.com>
Cc: Kuan-Ying Lee <Kuan-Ying.Lee@mediatek.com>
Cc: Chinwen Chang <chinwen.chang@mediatek.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

0d4a062a 14-Jul-2021 Marco Elver <elver@google.com>

mm: move helper to check slub_debug_enabled

Move the helper to check slub_debug_enabled, so that we can confine the
use of #ifdef outside slub.c as well.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210705103229.8505-2-yee.lee@mediatek.com
Signed-off-by: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Yee Lee <yee.lee@mediatek.com>
Suggested-by: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>
Cc: Andrey Konovalov <andreyknvl@gmail.com>
Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <ryabinin.a.a@gmail.com>
Cc: Chinwen Chang <chinwen.chang@mediatek.com>
Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com>
Cc: Kuan-Ying Lee <Kuan-Ying.Lee@mediatek.com>
Cc: Nicholas Tang <nicholas.tang@mediatek.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

7506ae6a 24-May-2021 Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>

mm: Add functions to lock invalidate_lock for two mappings

Some operations such as reflinking blocks among files will need to lock
invalidate_lock for two mappings. Add helper functions to do that.

Reviewed-by: Darrick J. Wong <djwong@kernel.org>
Reviewed-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Signed-off-by: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>

730633f0 28-Jan-2021 Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>

mm: Protect operations adding pages to page cache with invalidate_lock

Currently, serializing operations such as page fault, read, or readahead
against hole punching is rather difficult. The basic race scheme is
like:

fallocate(FALLOC_FL_PUNCH_HOLE) read / fault / ..
truncate_inode_pages_range()
<create pages in page
cache here>
<update fs block mapping and free blocks>

Now the problem is in this way read / page fault / readahead can
instantiate pages in page cache with potentially stale data (if blocks
get quickly reused). Avoiding this race is not simple - page locks do
not work because we want to make sure there are *no* pages in given
range. inode->i_rwsem does not work because page fault happens under
mmap_sem which ranks below inode->i_rwsem. Also using it for reads makes
the performance for mixed read-write workloads suffer.

So create a new rw_semaphore in the address_space - invalidate_lock -
that protects adding of pages to page cache for page faults / reads /
readahead.

Reviewed-by: Darrick J. Wong <djwong@kernel.org>
Reviewed-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Signed-off-by: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>

79789db0 12-Jul-2021 Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>

mm: Make copy_huge_page() always available

Rewrite copy_huge_page() and move it into mm/util.c so it's always
available. Fixes an exposure of uninitialised memory on configurations
with HUGETLB and UFFD enabled and MIGRATION disabled.

Fixes: 8cc5fcbb5be8 ("mm, hugetlb: fix racy resv_huge_pages underflow on UFFDIO_COPY")
Signed-off-by: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Reviewed-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

efdb6720 11-Jul-2021 Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>

mm/rmap: fix munlocking Anon THP with mlocked ptes

Many thanks to Kirill for reminding that PageDoubleMap cannot be relied on
to warn of pte mappings in the Anon THP case; and a scan of subpages does
not seem appropriate here. Note how follow_trans_huge_pmd() does not even
mark an Anon THP as mlocked when compound_mapcount != 1: multiple mlocking
of Anon THP is avoided, so simply return from page_mlock() in this case.

Link: https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/cfa154c-d595-406-eb7d-eb9df730f944@google.com/
Fixes: d9770fcc1c0c ("mm/rmap: fix old bug: munlocking THP missed other mlocks")
Reported-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@nvidia.com>
Cc: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

9608703e 12-Apr-2021 Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>

mm: Fix comments mentioning i_mutex

inode->i_mutex has been replaced with inode->i_rwsem long ago. Fix
comments still mentioning i_mutex.

Reviewed-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Reviewed-by: Darrick J. Wong <djwong@kernel.org>
Acked-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>

6c855fce 07-Jul-2021 Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>

mm/rmap: try_to_migrate() skip zone_device !device_private

I know nothing about zone_device pages and !device_private pages; but if
try_to_migrate_one() will do nothing for them, then it's better that
try_to_migrate() filter them first, than trawl through all their vmas.

Signed-off-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/1241d356-8ec9-f47b-a5ec-9b2bf66d242@google.com/
Cc: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@nvidia.com>
Cc: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

023e1a8d 07-Jul-2021 Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>

mm/rmap: fix new bug: premature return from page_mlock_one()

In the unlikely race case that page_mlock_one() finds VM_LOCKED has been
cleared by the time it got page table lock, page_vma_mapped_walk_done()
must be called before returning, either explicitly, or by a final call
to page_vma_mapped_walk() - otherwise the page table remains locked.

Fixes: cd62734ca60d ("mm/rmap: split try_to_munlock from try_to_unmap")
Signed-off-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Reported-by: kernel test robot <oliver.sang@intel.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20210711151446.GB4070@xsang-OptiPlex-9020/
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/f71f8523-cba7-3342-40a7-114abc5d1f51@google.com/
Cc: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@nvidia.com>
Cc: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

d9770fcc 07-Jul-2021 Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>

mm/rmap: fix old bug: munlocking THP missed other mlocks

The kernel recovers in due course from missing Mlocked pages: but there
was no point in calling page_mlock() (formerly known as
try_to_munlock()) on a THP, because nothing got done even when it was
found to be mapped in another VM_LOCKED vma.

It's true that we need to be careful: Mlocked accounting of pte-mapped
THPs is too difficult (so consistently avoided); but Mlocked accounting
of only-pmd-mapped THPs is supposed to work, even when multiple mappings
are mlocked and munlocked or munmapped. Refine the tests.

There is already a VM_BUG_ON_PAGE(PageDoubleMap) in page_mlock(), so
page_mlock_one() does not even have to worry about that complication.

(I said the kernel recovers: but would page reclaim be likely to split
THP before rediscovering that it's VM_LOCKED? I've not followed that up)

Fixes: 9a73f61bdb8a ("thp, mlock: do not mlock PTE-mapped file huge pages")
Signed-off-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/cfa154c-d595-406-eb7d-eb9df730f944@google.com/
Cc: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@nvidia.com>
Cc: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

64b586d1 07-Jul-2021 Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>

mm/rmap: fix comments left over from recent changes

Parallel developments in mm/rmap.c have left behind some out-of-date
comments: try_to_migrate_one() also accepts TTU_SYNC (already commented
in try_to_migrate() itself), and try_to_migrate() returns nothing at
all.

TTU_SPLIT_FREEZE has just been deleted, so reword the comment about it
in mm/huge_memory.c; and TTU_IGNORE_ACCESS was removed in 5.11, so
delete the "recently referenced" comment from try_to_unmap_one() (once
upon a time the comment was near the removed codeblock, but they drifted
apart).

Signed-off-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/563ce5b2-7a44-5b4d-1dfd-59a0e65932a9@google.com/
Cc: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@nvidia.com>
Cc: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

6bce2443 05-Jul-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/page_alloc: Revert pahole zero-sized workaround

Commit dbbee9d5cd83 ("mm/page_alloc: convert per-cpu list protection to
local_lock") folded in a workaround patch for pahole that was unable to
deal with zero-sized percpu structures.

A superior workaround is achieved with commit a0b8200d06ad ("kbuild:
skip per-CPU BTF generation for pahole v1.18-v1.21").

This patch reverts the dummy field and the pahole version check.

Fixes: dbbee9d5cd83 ("mm/page_alloc: convert per-cpu list protection to local_lock")
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

20d5e570 10-Jul-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge branch 'for-5.14-fixes' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/dennis/percpu

Pull percpu fix from Dennis Zhou:
"This is just a single change to fix percpu depopulation. The code
relied on depopulation code written specifically for the free path and
relied on vmalloc to do the tlb flush lazily. As we're modifying the
backing pages during the lifetime of a chunk, we need to also flush
the tlb accordingly.

Guenter Roeck reported this issue in [1] on mips. I believe we just
happen to be lucky given the much larger chunk sizes on x86 and
consequently less churning of this memory"

Link: https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20210702191140.GA3166599@roeck-us.net/ [1]

* 'for-5.14-fixes' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/dennis/percpu:
percpu: flush tlb in pcpu_reclaim_populated()


3bbda69c 07-Jul-2021 Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>

mm/mremap: allow arch runtime override

Patch series "Speedup mremap on ppc64", v8.

This patchset enables MOVE_PMD/MOVE_PUD support on power. This requires
the platform to support updating higher-level page tables without updating
page table entries. This also needs to invalidate the Page Walk Cache on
architecture supporting the same.

This patch (of 3):

Architectures like ppc64 support faster mremap only with radix
translation. Hence allow a runtime check w.r.t support for fast mremap.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210616045735.374532-1-aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210616045735.374532-2-aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Kalesh Singh <kaleshsingh@google.com>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: Joel Fernandes <joel@joelfernandes.org>
Cc: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill@shutemov.name>
Cc: "Aneesh Kumar K . V" <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

97113eb3 07-Jul-2021 Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>

mm/mremap: hold the rmap lock in write mode when moving page table entries.

To avoid a race between rmap walk and mremap, mremap does
take_rmap_locks(). The lock was taken to ensure that rmap walk don't miss
a page table entry due to PTE moves via move_pagetables(). The kernel
does further optimization of this lock such that if we are going to find
the newly added vma after the old vma, the rmap lock is not taken. This
is because rmap walk would find the vmas in the same order and if we don't
find the page table attached to older vma we would find it with the new
vma which we would iterate later.

As explained in commit eb66ae030829 ("mremap: properly flush TLB before
releasing the page") mremap is special in that it doesn't take ownership
of the page. The optimized version for PUD/PMD aligned mremap also
doesn't hold the ptl lock. This can result in stale TLB entries as show
below.

This patch updates the rmap locking requirement in mremap to handle the race condition
explained below with optimized mremap::

Optmized PMD move

CPU 1 CPU 2 CPU 3

mremap(old_addr, new_addr) page_shrinker/try_to_unmap_one

mmap_write_lock_killable()

addr = old_addr
lock(pte_ptl)
lock(pmd_ptl)
pmd = *old_pmd
pmd_clear(old_pmd)
flush_tlb_range(old_addr)

*new_pmd = pmd
*new_addr = 10; and fills
TLB with new addr
and old pfn

unlock(pmd_ptl)
ptep_clear_flush()
old pfn is free.
Stale TLB entry

Optimized PUD move also suffers from a similar race. Both the above race
condition can be fixed if we force mremap path to take rmap lock.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210616045239.370802-7-aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com
Fixes: 2c91bd4a4e2e ("mm: speed up mremap by 20x on large regions")
Fixes: c49dd3401802 ("mm: speedup mremap on 1GB or larger regions")
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/linux-mm/CAHk-=wgXVR04eBNtxQfevontWnP6FDm+oj5vauQXP3S-huwbPw@mail.gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Acked-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu>
Cc: Joel Fernandes <joel@joelfernandes.org>
Cc: Kalesh Singh <kaleshsingh@google.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill@shutemov.name>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au>
Cc: <stable@vger.kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

0881ace2 07-Jul-2021 Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>

mm/mremap: use pmd/pud_poplulate to update page table entries

pmd/pud_populate is the right interface to be used to set the respective
page table entries. Some architectures like ppc64 do assume that
set_pmd/pud_at can only be used to set a hugepage PTE. Since we are not
setting up a hugepage PTE here, use the pmd/pud_populate interface.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210616045239.370802-6-aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Joel Fernandes <joel@joelfernandes.org>
Cc: Kalesh Singh <kaleshsingh@google.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

d6655dff 07-Jul-2021 Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>

mm/mremap: don't enable optimized PUD move if page table levels is 2

With two level page table don't enable move_normal_pud.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210616045239.370802-5-aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Joel Fernandes <joel@joelfernandes.org>
Cc: Kalesh Singh <kaleshsingh@google.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

7d846db7 07-Jul-2021 Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>

mm/mremap: convert huge PUD move to separate helper

With TRANSPARENT_HUGEPAGE_PUD enabled the kernel can find huge PUD
entries. Add a helper to move huge PUD entries on mremap().

This will be used by a later patch to optimize mremap of PUD_SIZE aligned
level 4 PTE mapped address

This also make sure we support mremap on huge PUD entries even with
CONFIG_HAVE_MOVE_PUD disabled.

[aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com: fix build failure with clang-10]
Link: https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/YMuOSnJsL9qkxweY@archlinux-ax161
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210619134310.89098-1-aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210616045239.370802-4-aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com
Signed-off-by: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Joel Fernandes <joel@joelfernandes.org>
Cc: Kalesh Singh <kaleshsingh@google.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

5748fbc5 07-Jul-2021 Kefeng Wang <wangkefeng.wang@huawei.com>

mm: add setup_initial_init_mm() helper

Patch series "init_mm: cleanup ARCH's text/data/brk setup code", v3.

Add setup_initial_init_mm() helper, then use it to cleanup the text, data
and brk setup code.

This patch (of 15):

Add setup_initial_init_mm() helper to setup kernel text, data and brk.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210608083418.137226-1-wangkefeng.wang@huawei.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210608083418.137226-2-wangkefeng.wang@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Kefeng Wang <wangkefeng.wang@huawei.com>
Cc: Souptick Joarder <jrdr.linux@gmail.com>
Cc: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Christian Borntraeger <borntraeger@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org>
Cc: Greentime Hu <green.hu@gmail.com>
Cc: Greg Ungerer <gerg@linux-m68k.org>
Cc: Guo Ren <guoren@kernel.org>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <hca@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Jonas Bonn <jonas@southpole.se>
Cc: Ley Foon Tan <ley.foon.tan@intel.com>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Nick Hu <nickhu@andestech.com>
Cc: Palmer Dabbelt <palmer@dabbelt.com>
Cc: Paul Walmsley <paul.walmsley@sifive.com>
Cc: Rich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
Cc: Russell King (Oracle) <rmk+kernel@armlinux.org.uk>
Cc: Stafford Horne <shorne@gmail.com>
Cc: Stefan Kristiansson <stefan.kristiansson@saunalahti.fi>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Vasily Gorbik <gor@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Vineet Gupta <vgupta@synopsys.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Cc: Yoshinori Sato <ysato@users.sourceforge.jp>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

9a436f8f 07-Jul-2021 Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>

PM: hibernate: disable when there are active secretmem users

It is unsafe to allow saving of secretmem areas to the hibernation
snapshot as they would be visible after the resume and this essentially
will defeat the purpose of secret memory mappings.

Prevent hibernation whenever there are active secret memory users.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210518072034.31572-6-rppt@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Acked-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Acked-by: James Bottomley <James.Bottomley@HansenPartnership.com>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Andy Lutomirski <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Christopher Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Elena Reshetova <elena.reshetova@intel.com>
Cc: Hagen Paul Pfeifer <hagen@jauu.net>
Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: James Bottomley <jejb@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill@shutemov.name>
Cc: Mark Rutland <mark.rutland@arm.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com>
Cc: Palmer Dabbelt <palmer@dabbelt.com>
Cc: Palmer Dabbelt <palmerdabbelt@google.com>
Cc: Paul Walmsley <paul.walmsley@sifive.com>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Rick Edgecombe <rick.p.edgecombe@intel.com>
Cc: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Tycho Andersen <tycho@tycho.ws>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Cc: kernel test robot <lkp@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

1507f512 07-Jul-2021 Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>

mm: introduce memfd_secret system call to create "secret" memory areas

Introduce "memfd_secret" system call with the ability to create memory
areas visible only in the context of the owning process and not mapped not
only to other processes but in the kernel page tables as well.

The secretmem feature is off by default and the user must explicitly
enable it at the boot time.

Once secretmem is enabled, the user will be able to create a file
descriptor using the memfd_secret() system call. The memory areas created
by mmap() calls from this file descriptor will be unmapped from the kernel
direct map and they will be only mapped in the page table of the processes
that have access to the file descriptor.

Secretmem is designed to provide the following protections:

* Enhanced protection (in conjunction with all the other in-kernel
attack prevention systems) against ROP attacks. Seceretmem makes
"simple" ROP insufficient to perform exfiltration, which increases the
required complexity of the attack. Along with other protections like
the kernel stack size limit and address space layout randomization which
make finding gadgets is really hard, absence of any in-kernel primitive
for accessing secret memory means the one gadget ROP attack can't work.
Since the only way to access secret memory is to reconstruct the missing
mapping entry, the attacker has to recover the physical page and insert
a PTE pointing to it in the kernel and then retrieve the contents. That
takes at least three gadgets which is a level of difficulty beyond most
standard attacks.

* Prevent cross-process secret userspace memory exposures. Once the
secret memory is allocated, the user can't accidentally pass it into the
kernel to be transmitted somewhere. The secreremem pages cannot be
accessed via the direct map and they are disallowed in GUP.

* Harden against exploited kernel flaws. In order to access secretmem,
a kernel-side attack would need to either walk the page tables and
create new ones, or spawn a new privileged uiserspace process to perform
secrets exfiltration using ptrace.

The file descriptor based memory has several advantages over the
"traditional" mm interfaces, such as mlock(), mprotect(), madvise(). File
descriptor approach allows explicit and controlled sharing of the memory
areas, it allows to seal the operations. Besides, file descriptor based
memory paves the way for VMMs to remove the secret memory range from the
userspace hipervisor process, for instance QEMU. Andy Lutomirski says:

"Getting fd-backed memory into a guest will take some possibly major
work in the kernel, but getting vma-backed memory into a guest without
mapping it in the host user address space seems much, much worse."

memfd_secret() is made a dedicated system call rather than an extension to
memfd_create() because it's purpose is to allow the user to create more
secure memory mappings rather than to simply allow file based access to
the memory. Nowadays a new system call cost is negligible while it is way
simpler for userspace to deal with a clear-cut system calls than with a
multiplexer or an overloaded syscall. Moreover, the initial
implementation of memfd_secret() is completely distinct from
memfd_create() so there is no much sense in overloading memfd_create() to
begin with. If there will be a need for code sharing between these
implementation it can be easily achieved without a need to adjust user
visible APIs.

The secret memory remains accessible in the process context using uaccess
primitives, but it is not exposed to the kernel otherwise; secret memory
areas are removed from the direct map and functions in the
follow_page()/get_user_page() family will refuse to return a page that
belongs to the secret memory area.

Once there will be a use case that will require exposing secretmem to the
kernel it will be an opt-in request in the system call flags so that user
would have to decide what data can be exposed to the kernel.

Removing of the pages from the direct map may cause its fragmentation on
architectures that use large pages to map the physical memory which
affects the system performance. However, the original Kconfig text for
CONFIG_DIRECT_GBPAGES said that gigabyte pages in the direct map "... can
improve the kernel's performance a tiny bit ..." (commit 00d1c5e05736
("x86: add gbpages switches")) and the recent report [1] showed that "...
although 1G mappings are a good default choice, there is no compelling
evidence that it must be the only choice". Hence, it is sufficient to
have secretmem disabled by default with the ability of a system
administrator to enable it at boot time.

Pages in the secretmem regions are unevictable and unmovable to avoid
accidental exposure of the sensitive data via swap or during page
migration.

Since the secretmem mappings are locked in memory they cannot exceed
RLIMIT_MEMLOCK. Since these mappings are already locked independently
from mlock(), an attempt to mlock()/munlock() secretmem range would fail
and mlockall()/munlockall() will ignore secretmem mappings.

However, unlike mlock()ed memory, secretmem currently behaves more like
long-term GUP: secretmem mappings are unmovable mappings directly consumed
by user space. With default limits, there is no excessive use of
secretmem and it poses no real problem in combination with
ZONE_MOVABLE/CMA, but in the future this should be addressed to allow
balanced use of large amounts of secretmem along with ZONE_MOVABLE/CMA.

A page that was a part of the secret memory area is cleared when it is
freed to ensure the data is not exposed to the next user of that page.

The following example demonstrates creation of a secret mapping (error
handling is omitted):

fd = memfd_secret(0);
ftruncate(fd, MAP_SIZE);
ptr = mmap(NULL, MAP_SIZE, PROT_READ | PROT_WRITE,
MAP_SHARED, fd, 0);

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-mm/213b4567-46ce-f116-9cdf-bbd0c884eb3c@linux.intel.com/

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: suppress Kconfig whine]

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210518072034.31572-5-rppt@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Acked-by: Hagen Paul Pfeifer <hagen@jauu.net>
Acked-by: James Bottomley <James.Bottomley@HansenPartnership.com>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Andy Lutomirski <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Christopher Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Elena Reshetova <elena.reshetova@intel.com>
Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: James Bottomley <jejb@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill@shutemov.name>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Mark Rutland <mark.rutland@arm.com>
Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com>
Cc: Palmer Dabbelt <palmer@dabbelt.com>
Cc: Palmer Dabbelt <palmerdabbelt@google.com>
Cc: Paul Walmsley <paul.walmsley@sifive.com>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Rick Edgecombe <rick.p.edgecombe@intel.com>
Cc: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Tycho Andersen <tycho@tycho.ws>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: kernel test robot <lkp@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

6aeb2542 07-Jul-2021 Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>

mmap: make mlock_future_check() global

Patch series "mm: introduce memfd_secret system call to create "secret" memory areas", v20.

This is an implementation of "secret" mappings backed by a file
descriptor.

The file descriptor backing secret memory mappings is created using a
dedicated memfd_secret system call The desired protection mode for the
memory is configured using flags parameter of the system call. The mmap()
of the file descriptor created with memfd_secret() will create a "secret"
memory mapping. The pages in that mapping will be marked as not present
in the direct map and will be present only in the page table of the owning
mm.

Although normally Linux userspace mappings are protected from other users,
such secret mappings are useful for environments where a hostile tenant is
trying to trick the kernel into giving them access to other tenants
mappings.

It's designed to provide the following protections:

* Enhanced protection (in conjunction with all the other in-kernel
attack prevention systems) against ROP attacks. Seceretmem makes
"simple" ROP insufficient to perform exfiltration, which increases the
required complexity of the attack. Along with other protections like
the kernel stack size limit and address space layout randomization which
make finding gadgets is really hard, absence of any in-kernel primitive
for accessing secret memory means the one gadget ROP attack can't work.
Since the only way to access secret memory is to reconstruct the missing
mapping entry, the attacker has to recover the physical page and insert
a PTE pointing to it in the kernel and then retrieve the contents. That
takes at least three gadgets which is a level of difficulty beyond most
standard attacks.

* Prevent cross-process secret userspace memory exposures. Once the
secret memory is allocated, the user can't accidentally pass it into the
kernel to be transmitted somewhere. The secreremem pages cannot be
accessed via the direct map and they are disallowed in GUP.

* Harden against exploited kernel flaws. In order to access secretmem,
a kernel-side attack would need to either walk the page tables and
create new ones, or spawn a new privileged uiserspace process to perform
secrets exfiltration using ptrace.

In the future the secret mappings may be used as a mean to protect guest
memory in a virtual machine host.

For demonstration of secret memory usage we've created a userspace library

https://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/jejb/secret-memory-preloader.git

that does two things: the first is act as a preloader for openssl to
redirect all the OPENSSL_malloc calls to secret memory meaning any secret
keys get automatically protected this way and the other thing it does is
expose the API to the user who needs it. We anticipate that a lot of the
use cases would be like the openssl one: many toolkits that deal with
secret keys already have special handling for the memory to try to give
them greater protection, so this would simply be pluggable into the
toolkits without any need for user application modification.

Hiding secret memory mappings behind an anonymous file allows usage of the
page cache for tracking pages allocated for the "secret" mappings as well
as using address_space_operations for e.g. page migration callbacks.

The anonymous file may be also used implicitly, like hugetlb files, to
implement mmap(MAP_SECRET) and use the secret memory areas with "native"
mm ABIs in the future.

Removing of the pages from the direct map may cause its fragmentation on
architectures that use large pages to map the physical memory which
affects the system performance. However, the original Kconfig text for
CONFIG_DIRECT_GBPAGES said that gigabyte pages in the direct map "... can
improve the kernel's performance a tiny bit ..." (commit 00d1c5e05736
("x86: add gbpages switches")) and the recent report [1] showed that "...
although 1G mappings are a good default choice, there is no compelling
evidence that it must be the only choice". Hence, it is sufficient to
have secretmem disabled by default with the ability of a system
administrator to enable it at boot time.

In addition, there is also a long term goal to improve management of the
direct map.

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-mm/213b4567-46ce-f116-9cdf-bbd0c884eb3c@linux.intel.com/

This patch (of 7):

It will be used by the upcoming secret memory implementation.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210518072034.31572-1-rppt@kernel.org
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210518072034.31572-2-rppt@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Acked-by: James Bottomley <James.Bottomley@HansenPartnership.com>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Andy Lutomirski <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Christopher Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Elena Reshetova <elena.reshetova@intel.com>
Cc: Hagen Paul Pfeifer <hagen@jauu.net>
Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: James Bottomley <jejb@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: "Kirill A. Shutemov" <kirill@shutemov.name>
Cc: Mark Rutland <mark.rutland@arm.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Michael Kerrisk <mtk.manpages@gmail.com>
Cc: Palmer Dabbelt <palmer@dabbelt.com>
Cc: Palmer Dabbelt <palmerdabbelt@google.com>
Cc: Paul Walmsley <paul.walmsley@sifive.com>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Rick Edgecombe <rick.p.edgecombe@intel.com>
Cc: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Tycho Andersen <tycho@tycho.ws>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Cc: kernel test robot <lkp@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

78869146 07-Jul-2021 Oliver Glitta <glittao@gmail.com>

mm/slub: use stackdepot to save stack trace in objects

Many stack traces are similar so there are many similar arrays.
Stackdepot saves each unique stack only once.

Replace field addrs in struct track with depot_stack_handle_t handle. Use
stackdepot to save stack trace.

The benefits are smaller memory overhead and possibility to aggregate
per-cache statistics in the future using the stackdepot handle instead of
matching stacks manually.

[rdunlap@infradead.org: rename save_stack_trace()]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210513051920.29320-1-rdunlap@infradead.org
[vbabka@suse.cz: fix lockdep splat]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210516195150.26740-1-vbabka@suse.czLink: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210414163434.4376-1-glittao@gmail.com

Signed-off-by: Oliver Glitta <glittao@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Reviewed-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Christoph Lameter <cl@linux.com>
Cc: Pekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org>
Cc: Joonsoo Kim <iamjoonsoo.kim@lge.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

28e92f99 04-Jul-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge branch 'core-rcu-2021.07.04' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/paulmck/linux-rcu

Pull RCU updates from Paul McKenney:

- Bitmap parsing support for "all" as an alias for all bits

- Documentation updates

- Miscellaneous fixes, including some that overlap into mm and lockdep

- kvfree_rcu() updates

- mem_dump_obj() updates, with acks from one of the slab-allocator
maintainers

- RCU NOCB CPU updates, including limited deoffloading

- SRCU updates

- Tasks-RCU updates

- Torture-test updates

* 'core-rcu-2021.07.04' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/paulmck/linux-rcu: (78 commits)
tasks-rcu: Make show_rcu_tasks_gp_kthreads() be static inline
rcu-tasks: Make ksoftirqd provide RCU Tasks quiescent states
rcu: Add missing __releases() annotation
rcu: Remove obsolete rcu_read_unlock() deadlock commentary
rcu: Improve comments describing RCU read-side critical sections
rcu: Create an unrcu_pointer() to remove __rcu from a pointer
srcu: Early test SRCU polling start
rcu: Fix various typos in comments
rcu/nocb: Unify timers
rcu/nocb: Prepare for fine-grained deferred wakeup
rcu/nocb: Only cancel nocb timer if not polling
rcu/nocb: Delete bypass_timer upon nocb_gp wakeup
rcu/nocb: Cancel nocb_timer upon nocb_gp wakeup
rcu/nocb: Allow de-offloading rdp leader
rcu/nocb: Directly call __wake_nocb_gp() from bypass timer
rcu: Don't penalize priority boosting when there is nothing to boost
rcu: Point to documentation of ordering guarantees
rcu: Make rcu_gp_cleanup() be noinline for tracing
rcu: Restrict RCU_STRICT_GRACE_PERIOD to at most four CPUs
rcu: Make show_rcu_gp_kthreads() dump rcu_node structures blocking GP
...


a412897f 04-Jul-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge tag 'memblock-v5.14-rc1' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/rppt/memblock

Pull memblock updates from Mike Rapoport:
"Fix arm crashes caused by holes in the memory map.

The coordination between freeing of unused memory map, pfn_valid() and
core mm assumptions about validity of the memory map in various ranges
was not designed for complex layouts of the physical memory with a lot
of holes all over the place.

Kefen Wang reported crashes in move_freepages() on a system with the
following memory layout [1]:

node 0: [mem 0x0000000080a00000-0x00000000855fffff]
node 0: [mem 0x0000000086a00000-0x0000000087dfffff]
node 0: [mem 0x000000008bd00000-0x000000008c4fffff]
node 0: [mem 0x000000008e300000-0x000000008ecfffff]
node 0: [mem 0x0000000090d00000-0x00000000bfffffff]
node 0: [mem 0x00000000cc000000-0x00000000dc9fffff]
node 0: [mem 0x00000000de700000-0x00000000de9fffff]
node 0: [mem 0x00000000e0800000-0x00000000e0bfffff]
node 0: [mem 0x00000000f4b00000-0x00000000f6ffffff]
node 0: [mem 0x00000000fda00000-0x00000000ffffefff]

These crashes can be mitigated by enabling CONFIG_HOLES_IN_ZONE on ARM
and essentially turning pfn_valid_within() to pfn_valid() instead of
having it hardwired to 1 on that architecture, but this would require
to keep CONFIG_HOLES_IN_ZONE solely for this purpose.

A cleaner approach is to update ARM's implementation of pfn_valid() to
take into accounting rounding of the freed memory map to pageblock
boundaries and make sure it returns true for PFNs that have memory map
entries even if there is no physical memory backing those PFNs"

Link: https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/2a1592ad-bc9d-4664-fd19-f7448a37edc0@huawei.com [1]

* tag 'memblock-v5.14-rc1' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/rppt/memblock:
arm: extend pfn_valid to take into account freed memory map alignment
memblock: ensure there is no overflow in memblock_overlaps_region()
memblock: align freed memory map on pageblock boundaries with SPARSEMEM
memblock: free_unused_memmap: use pageblock units instead of MAX_ORDER


93274f1d 02-Jul-2021 Dennis Zhou <dennis@kernel.org>

percpu: flush tlb in pcpu_reclaim_populated()

Prior to "percpu: implement partial chunk depopulation",
pcpu_depopulate_chunk() was called only on the destruction path. This
meant the virtual address range was on its way back to vmalloc which
will handle flushing the tlbs for us.

However, with pcpu_reclaim_populated(), we are now calling
pcpu_depopulate_chunk() during the active lifecycle of a chunk.
Therefore, we need to flush the tlb as well otherwise we can end up
accessing the wrong page through an invalid tlb mapping as reported in
[1].

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20210702191140.GA3166599@roeck-us.net/

Fixes: f183324133ea ("percpu: implement partial chunk depopulation")
Reported-and-tested-by: Guenter Roeck <linux@roeck-us.net>
Signed-off-by: Dennis Zhou <dennis@kernel.org>

d3acb15a 03-Jul-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge branch 'work.iov_iter' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/viro/vfs

Pull iov_iter updates from Al Viro:
"iov_iter cleanups and fixes.

There are followups, but this is what had sat in -next this cycle. IMO
the macro forest in there became much thinner and easier to follow..."

* 'work.iov_iter' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/viro/vfs: (37 commits)
csum_and_copy_to_pipe_iter(): leave handling of csum_state to caller
clean up copy_mc_pipe_to_iter()
pipe_zero(): we don't need no stinkin' kmap_atomic()...
iov_iter: clean csum_and_copy_...() primitives up a bit
copy_page_from_iter(): don't need kmap_atomic() for kvec/bvec cases
copy_page_to_iter(): don't bother with kmap_atomic() for bvec/kvec cases
iterate_xarray(): only of the first iteration we might get offset != 0
pull handling of ->iov_offset into iterate_{iovec,bvec,xarray}
iov_iter: make iterator callbacks use base and len instead of iovec
iov_iter: make the amount already copied available to iterator callbacks
iov_iter: get rid of separate bvec and xarray callbacks
iov_iter: teach iterate_{bvec,xarray}() about possible short copies
iterate_bvec(): expand bvec.h macro forest, massage a bit
iov_iter: unify iterate_iovec and iterate_kvec
iov_iter: massage iterate_iovec and iterate_kvec to logics similar to iterate_bvec
iterate_and_advance(): get rid of magic in case when n is 0
csum_and_copy_to_iter(): massage into form closer to csum_and_copy_from_iter()
iov_iter: replace iov_iter_copy_from_user_atomic() with iterator-advancing variant
[xarray] iov_iter_npages(): just use DIV_ROUND_UP()
iov_iter_npages(): don't bother with iterate_all_kinds()
...


71bd9341 02-Jul-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge branch 'akpm' (patches from Andrew)

Merge more updates from Andrew Morton:
"190 patches.

Subsystems affected by this patch series: mm (hugetlb, userfaultfd,
vmscan, kconfig, proc, z3fold, zbud, ras, mempolicy, memblock,
migration, thp, nommu, kconfig, madvise, memory-hotplug, zswap,
zsmalloc, zram, cleanups, kfence, and hmm), procfs, sysctl, misc,
core-kernel, lib, lz4, checkpatch, init, kprobes, nilfs2, hfs,
signals, exec, kcov, selftests, compress/decompress, and ipc"

* emailed patches from Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>: (190 commits)
ipc/util.c: use binary search for max_idx
ipc/sem.c: use READ_ONCE()/WRITE_ONCE() for use_global_lock
ipc: use kmalloc for msg_queue and shmid_kernel
ipc sem: use kvmalloc for sem_undo allocation
lib/decompressors: remove set but not used variabled 'level'
selftests/vm/pkeys: exercise x86 XSAVE init state
selftests/vm/pkeys: refill shadow register after implicit kernel write
selftests/vm/pkeys: handle negative sys_pkey_alloc() return code
selftests/vm/pkeys: fix alloc_random_pkey() to make it really, really random
kcov: add __no_sanitize_coverage to fix noinstr for all architectures
exec: remove checks in __register_bimfmt()
x86: signal: don't do sas_ss_reset() until we are certain that sigframe won't be abandoned
hfsplus: report create_date to kstat.btime
hfsplus: remove unnecessary oom message
nilfs2: remove redundant continue statement in a while-loop
kprobes: remove duplicated strong free_insn_page in x86 and s390
init: print out unknown kernel parameters
checkpatch: do not complain about positive return values starting with EPOLL
checkpatch: improve the indented label test
checkpatch: scripts/spdxcheck.py now requires python3
...


e267992f 01-Jul-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge branch 'for-5.14' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/dennis/percpu

Pull percpu updates from Dennis Zhou:

- percpu chunk depopulation - depopulate backing pages for chunks with
empty pages when we exceed a global threshold without those pages.
This lets us reclaim a portion of memory that would previously be
lost until the full chunk would be freed (possibly never).

- memcg accounting cleanup - previously separate chunks were managed
for normal allocations and __GFP_ACCOUNT allocations. These are now
consolidated which cleans up the code quite a bit.

- a few misc clean ups for clang warnings

* 'for-5.14' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/dennis/percpu:
percpu: optimize locking in pcpu_balance_workfn()
percpu: initialize best_upa variable
percpu: rework memcg accounting
mm, memcg: introduce mem_cgroup_kmem_disabled()
mm, memcg: mark cgroup_memory_nosocket, nokmem and noswap as __ro_after_init
percpu: make symbol 'pcpu_free_slot' static
percpu: implement partial chunk depopulation
percpu: use pcpu_free_slot instead of pcpu_nr_slots - 1
percpu: factor out pcpu_check_block_hint()
percpu: split __pcpu_balance_workfn()
percpu: fix a comment about the chunks ordering


b756a3b5 30-Jun-2021 Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>

mm: device exclusive memory access

Some devices require exclusive write access to shared virtual memory (SVM)
ranges to perform atomic operations on that memory. This requires CPU
page tables to be updated to deny access whilst atomic operations are
occurring.

In order to do this introduce a new swap entry type
(SWP_DEVICE_EXCLUSIVE). When a SVM range needs to be marked for exclusive
access by a device all page table mappings for the particular range are
replaced with device exclusive swap entries. This causes any CPU access
to the page to result in a fault.

Faults are resovled by replacing the faulting entry with the original
mapping. This results in MMU notifiers being called which a driver uses
to update access permissions such as revoking atomic access. After
notifiers have been called the device will no longer have exclusive access
to the region.

Walking of the page tables to find the target pages is handled by
get_user_pages() rather than a direct page table walk. A direct page
table walk similar to what migrate_vma_collect()/unmap() does could also
have been utilised. However this resulted in more code similar in
functionality to what get_user_pages() provides as page faulting is
required to make the PTEs present and to break COW.

[dan.carpenter@oracle.com: fix signedness bug in make_device_exclusive_range()]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/YNIz5NVnZ5GiZ3u1@mwanda

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210616105937.23201-8-apopple@nvidia.com
Signed-off-by: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Signed-off-by: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Reviewed-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: Ben Skeggs <bskeggs@redhat.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@nvidia.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: "Matthew Wilcox (Oracle)" <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

9a5cc85c 30-Jun-2021 Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>

mm/memory.c: allow different return codes for copy_nonpresent_pte()

Currently if copy_nonpresent_pte() returns a non-zero value it is assumed
to be a swap entry which requires further processing outside the loop in
copy_pte_range() after dropping locks. This prevents other values being
returned to signal conditions such as failure which a subsequent change
requires.

Instead make copy_nonpresent_pte() return an error code if further
processing is required and read the value for the swap entry in the main
loop under the ptl.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210616105937.23201-7-apopple@nvidia.com
Signed-off-by: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Ben Skeggs <bskeggs@redhat.com>
Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@nvidia.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: "Matthew Wilcox (Oracle)" <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

6b49bf6d 30-Jun-2021 Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>

mm: rename migrate_pgmap_owner

MMU notifier ranges have a migrate_pgmap_owner field which is used by
drivers to store a pointer. This is subsequently used by the driver
callback to filter MMU_NOTIFY_MIGRATE events. Other notifier event types
can also benefit from this filtering, so rename the 'migrate_pgmap_owner'
field to 'owner' and create a new notifier initialisation function to
initialise this field.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210616105937.23201-6-apopple@nvidia.com
Signed-off-by: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Suggested-by: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Ben Skeggs <bskeggs@redhat.com>
Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@nvidia.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: "Matthew Wilcox (Oracle)" <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

a98a2f0c 30-Jun-2021 Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>

mm/rmap: split migration into its own function

Migration is currently implemented as a mode of operation for
try_to_unmap_one() generally specified by passing the TTU_MIGRATION flag
or in the case of splitting a huge anonymous page TTU_SPLIT_FREEZE.

However it does not have much in common with the rest of the unmap
functionality of try_to_unmap_one() and thus splitting it into a separate
function reduces the complexity of try_to_unmap_one() making it more
readable.

Several simplifications can also be made in try_to_migrate_one() based on
the following observations:

- All users of TTU_MIGRATION also set TTU_IGNORE_MLOCK.
- No users of TTU_MIGRATION ever set TTU_IGNORE_HWPOISON.
- No users of TTU_MIGRATION ever set TTU_BATCH_FLUSH.

TTU_SPLIT_FREEZE is a special case of migration used when splitting an
anonymous page. This is most easily dealt with by calling the correct
function from unmap_page() in mm/huge_memory.c - either try_to_migrate()
for PageAnon or try_to_unmap().

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210616105937.23201-5-apopple@nvidia.com
Signed-off-by: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Reviewed-by: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: Ben Skeggs <bskeggs@redhat.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@nvidia.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: "Matthew Wilcox (Oracle)" <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

cd62734c 30-Jun-2021 Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>

mm/rmap: split try_to_munlock from try_to_unmap

The behaviour of try_to_unmap_one() is difficult to follow because it
performs different operations based on a fairly large set of flags used in
different combinations.

TTU_MUNLOCK is one such flag. However it is exclusively used by
try_to_munlock() which specifies no other flags. Therefore rather than
overload try_to_unmap_one() with unrelated behaviour split this out into
it's own function and remove the flag.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210616105937.23201-4-apopple@nvidia.com
Signed-off-by: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: Ben Skeggs <bskeggs@redhat.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@nvidia.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: "Matthew Wilcox (Oracle)" <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

4dd845b5 30-Jun-2021 Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>

mm/swapops: rework swap entry manipulation code

Both migration and device private pages use special swap entries that are
manipluated by a range of inline functions. The arguments to these are
somewhat inconsistent so rework them to remove flag type arguments and to
make the arguments similar for both read and write entry creation.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210616105937.23201-3-apopple@nvidia.com
Signed-off-by: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Reviewed-by: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: Ben Skeggs <bskeggs@redhat.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: "Matthew Wilcox (Oracle)" <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

af5cdaf8 30-Jun-2021 Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>

mm: remove special swap entry functions

Patch series "Add support for SVM atomics in Nouveau", v11.

Introduction
============

Some devices have features such as atomic PTE bits that can be used to
implement atomic access to system memory. To support atomic operations to
a shared virtual memory page such a device needs access to that page which
is exclusive of the CPU. This series introduces a mechanism to
temporarily unmap pages granting exclusive access to a device.

These changes are required to support OpenCL atomic operations in Nouveau
to shared virtual memory (SVM) regions allocated with the
CL_MEM_SVM_ATOMICS clSVMAlloc flag. A more complete description of the
OpenCL SVM feature is available at
https://www.khronos.org/registry/OpenCL/specs/3.0-unified/html/
OpenCL_API.html#_shared_virtual_memory .

Implementation
==============

Exclusive device access is implemented by adding a new swap entry type
(SWAP_DEVICE_EXCLUSIVE) which is similar to a migration entry. The main
difference is that on fault the original entry is immediately restored by
the fault handler instead of waiting.

Restoring the entry triggers calls to MMU notifers which allows a device
driver to revoke the atomic access permission from the GPU prior to the
CPU finalising the entry.

Patches
=======

Patches 1 & 2 refactor existing migration and device private entry
functions.

Patches 3 & 4 rework try_to_unmap_one() by splitting out unrelated
functionality into separate functions - try_to_migrate_one() and
try_to_munlock_one().

Patch 5 renames some existing code but does not introduce functionality.

Patch 6 is a small clean-up to swap entry handling in copy_pte_range().

Patch 7 contains the bulk of the implementation for device exclusive
memory.

Patch 8 contains some additions to the HMM selftests to ensure everything
works as expected.

Patch 9 is a cleanup for the Nouveau SVM implementation.

Patch 10 contains the implementation of atomic access for the Nouveau
driver.

Testing
=======

This has been tested with upstream Mesa 21.1.0 and a simple OpenCL program
which checks that GPU atomic accesses to system memory are atomic.
Without this series the test fails as there is no way of write-protecting
the page mapping which results in the device clobbering CPU writes. For
reference the test is available at
https://ozlabs.org/~apopple/opencl_svm_atomics/

Further testing has been performed by adding support for testing exclusive
access to the hmm-tests kselftests.

This patch (of 10):

Remove multiple similar inline functions for dealing with different types
of special swap entries.

Both migration and device private swap entries use the swap offset to
store a pfn. Instead of multiple inline functions to obtain a struct page
for each swap entry type use a common function pfn_swap_entry_to_page().
Also open-code the various entry_to_pfn() functions as this results is
shorter code that is easier to understand.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210616105937.23201-1-apopple@nvidia.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210616105937.23201-2-apopple@nvidia.com
Signed-off-by: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Reviewed-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: "Matthew Wilcox (Oracle)" <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Ben Skeggs <bskeggs@redhat.com>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@nvidia.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

ff06e45d 30-Jun-2021 Marco Elver <elver@google.com>

kfence: unconditionally use unbound work queue

Unconditionally use unbound work queue, and not just if wq_power_efficient
is true. Because if the system is idle, KFENCE may wait, and by being run
on the unbound work queue, we permit the scheduler to make better
scheduling decisions and not require pinning KFENCE to the same CPU upon
waking up.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210521111630.472579-1-elver@google.com
Fixes: 36f0b35d0894 ("kfence: use power-efficient work queue to run delayed work")
Signed-off-by: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Reported-by: Hillf Danton <hdanton@sina.com>
Reviewed-by: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>
Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

ffd8f251 30-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/page_alloc: move prototype for find_suitable_fallback

make W=1 generates the following warning in mmap_lock.c for allnoconfig

mm/page_alloc.c:2670:5: warning: no previous prototype for `find_suitable_fallback' [-Wmissing-prototypes]
int find_suitable_fallback(struct free_area *area, unsigned int order,
^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

find_suitable_fallback is only shared outside of page_alloc.c for
CONFIG_COMPACTION but to suppress the warning, move the protype outside of
CONFIG_COMPACTION. It is not worth the effort at this time to find a
clever way of allowing compaction.c to share the code or avoid the use
entirely as the function is called on relatively slow paths.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210520084809.8576-14-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Dan Streetman <ddstreet@ieee.org>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

d01079f3 30-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/mmap_lock: remove dead code for !CONFIG_TRACING configurations

make W=1 generates the following warning in mmap_lock.c for allnoconfig

mm/mmap_lock.c:213:6: warning: no previous prototype for `__mmap_lock_do_trace_start_locking' [-Wmissing-prototypes]
void __mmap_lock_do_trace_start_locking(struct mm_struct *mm, bool write)
^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
mm/mmap_lock.c:219:6: warning: no previous prototype for `__mmap_lock_do_trace_acquire_returned' [-Wmissing-prototypes]
void __mmap_lock_do_trace_acquire_returned(struct mm_struct *mm, bool write,
^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
mm/mmap_lock.c:226:6: warning: no previous prototype for `__mmap_lock_do_trace_released' [-Wmissing-prototypes]
void __mmap_lock_do_trace_released(struct mm_struct *mm, bool write)

On !CONFIG_TRACING configurations, the code is dead so put it behind an
#ifdef.

[cuibixuan@huawei.com: fix warning when CONFIG_TRACING is not defined]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210531033426.74031-1-cuibixuan@huawei.com

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210520084809.8576-13-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Signed-off-by: Bixuan Cui <cuibixuan@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Dan Streetman <ddstreet@ieee.org>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

30522175 30-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/z3fold: add kerneldoc fields for z3fold_pool

make W=1 generates the following warning for z3fold_pool

mm/z3fold.c:171: warning: Function parameter or member 'zpool' not described in 'z3fold_pool'
mm/z3fold.c:171: warning: Function parameter or member 'zpool_ops' not described in 'z3fold_pool'

Commit 9a001fc19ccc ("z3fold: the 3-fold allocator for compressed pages")
simply did not document the fields at the time. Add rudimentary
documentation.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210520084809.8576-11-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Dan Streetman <ddstreet@ieee.org>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

a29a7506 30-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/zbud: add kerneldoc fields for zbud_pool

make W=1 generates the following warning for zbud_pool

mm/zbud.c:105: warning: Function parameter or member 'zpool' not described in 'zbud_pool'
mm/zbud.c:105: warning: Function parameter or member 'zpool_ops' not described in 'zbud_pool'

Commit 479305fd7172 ("zpool: remove zpool_evict()") removed the
zpool_evict helper and added the associated zpool and operations structure
in struct zbud_pool but did not add documentation for the fields. Add
rudimentary documentation.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210520084809.8576-10-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Fixes: 479305fd7172 ("zpool: remove zpool_evict()")
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Dan Streetman <ddstreet@ieee.org>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

5640c9ca 30-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/memory_hotplug: fix kerneldoc comment for __remove_memory

make W=1 generates the following warning for __remove_memory

mm/memory_hotplug.c:2044: warning: expecting prototype for remove_memory(). Prototype was for __remove_memory() instead

Commit eca499ab3749 ("mm/hotplug: make remove_memory() interface usable")
introduced the kerneldoc comment and function but the kerneldoc name and
function name did not match.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210520084809.8576-9-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Fixes: eca499ab3749 ("mm/hotplug: make remove_memory() interface usable")
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Dan Streetman <ddstreet@ieee.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

ba2d2666 30-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/memory_hotplug: fix kerneldoc comment for __try_online_node

make W=1 generates the following warning for try_online_node

mm/memory_hotplug.c:1087: warning: expecting prototype for try_online_node(). Prototype was for __try_online_node() instead

Commit b9ff036082cd ("mm/memory_hotplug.c: make add_memory_resource use
__try_online_node") renamed the function but did not update the associated
kerneldoc. The function is static and somewhat specialised in nature so
it's not clear it warrants being a kerneldoc by moving the comment to
try_online_node. Hence, leave the comment of the internal helper in place
but leave it out of kerneldoc and correct the function name in the
comment.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210520084809.8576-8-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Fixes: Commit b9ff036082cd ("mm/memory_hotplug.c: make add_memory_resource use __try_online_node")
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Dan Streetman <ddstreet@ieee.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

05395718 30-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/memcontrol.c: fix kerneldoc comment for mem_cgroup_calculate_protection

make W=1 generates the following warning for mem_cgroup_calculate_protection

mm/memcontrol.c:6468: warning: expecting prototype for mem_cgroup_protected(). Prototype was for mem_cgroup_calculate_protection() instead

Commit 45c7f7e1ef17 ("mm, memcg: decouple e{low,min} state mutations from
protection checks") changed the function definition but not the associated
kerneldoc comment.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210520084809.8576-7-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Fixes: 45c7f7e1ef17 ("mm, memcg: decouple e{low,min} state mutations from protection checks")
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Chris Down <chris@chrisdown.name>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Dan Streetman <ddstreet@ieee.org>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

b417941f 30-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/mapping_dirty_helpers: remove double Note in kerneldoc

make W=1 generates the following warning for mm/mapping_dirty_helpers.c

mm/mapping_dirty_helpers.c:325: warning: duplicate section name 'Note'

The helper function is very specific to one driver -- vmwgfx. While the
two notes are separate, all of it needs to be taken into account when
using the helper so make it one note.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210520084809.8576-5-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Dan Streetman <ddstreet@ieee.org>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

f7173090 30-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/page_alloc: make should_fail_alloc_page() static

make W=1 generates the following warning for mm/page_alloc.c

mm/page_alloc.c:3651:15: warning: no previous prototype for `should_fail_alloc_page' [-Wmissing-prototypes]
noinline bool should_fail_alloc_page(gfp_t gfp_mask, unsigned int order)
^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This function is deliberately split out for BPF to allow errors to be
injected. The function is not used anywhere else so it is local to the
file. Make it static which should still allow error injection to be used
similar to how block/blk-core.c:should_fail_bio() works.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210520084809.8576-4-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Dan Streetman <ddstreet@ieee.org>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

5da96bdd 30-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/vmalloc: include header for prototype of set_iounmap_nonlazy

make W=1 generates the following warning for mm/vmalloc.c

mm/vmalloc.c:1599:6: warning: no previous prototype for `set_iounmap_nonlazy' [-Wmissing-prototypes]
void set_iounmap_nonlazy(void)
^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This is an arch-generic function only used by x86. On other arches, it's
dead code. Include the header with the definition and make it x86-64
specific.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210520084809.8576-3-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Dan Streetman <ddstreet@ieee.org>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

f611fab7 30-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/vmscan: remove kerneldoc-like comment from isolate_lru_pages

Patch series "Clean W=1 build warnings for mm/".

This is a janitorial only. During development of a tool to catch build
warnings early to avoid tripping the Intel lkp-robot, I noticed that mm/
is not clean for W=1. This is generally harmless but there is no harm in
cleaning it up. It disrupts git blame a little but on relatively obvious
lines that are unlikely to be git blame targets.

This patch (of 13):

make W=1 generates the following warning for vmscan.c

mm/vmscan.c:1814: warning: This comment starts with '/**', but isn't a kernel-doc comment. Refer Documentation/doc-guide/kernel-doc.rst

It is not a kerneldoc comment and isolate_lru_pages() is a static
function. While the detailed comment is nice, it does not need to be
exposed via kernel-doc.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210520084809.8576-1-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210520084809.8576-2-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Streetman <ddstreet@ieee.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

041711ce 30-Jun-2021 Zhen Lei <thunder.leizhen@huawei.com>

mm: fix spelling mistakes

Fix some spelling mistakes in comments:
each having differents usage ==> each has a different usage
statments ==> statements
adresses ==> addresses
aggresive ==> aggressive
datas ==> data
posion ==> poison
higer ==> higher
precisly ==> precisely
wont ==> won't
We moves tha ==> We move the
endianess ==> endianness

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210519065853.7723-2-thunder.leizhen@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Zhen Lei <thunder.leizhen@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: Souptick Joarder <jrdr.linux@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

c4ffefd1 30-Jun-2021 Hyeonggon Yoo <42.hyeyoo@gmail.com>

mm: fix typos and grammar error in comments

We moves tha -> We move that in mm/swap.c
statments -> statements in include/linux/mm.h

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210509063444.GA24745@hyeyoo
Signed-off-by: Hyeonggon Yoo <42.hyeyoo@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

33848337 30-Jun-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/zsmalloc.c: improve readability for async_free_zspage()

The class is extracted from pool->size_class[class_idx] again before
calling __free_zspage(). It looks like class will change after we fetch
the class lock. But this is misleading as class will stay unchanged.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210624123930.1769093-4-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Nitin Gupta <ngupta@vflare.org>
Cc: Sergey Senozhatsky <senozhatsky@chromium.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

ce8475b6 30-Jun-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/zsmalloc.c: remove confusing code in obj_free()

Patch series "Cleanup for zsmalloc".

This series contains cleanups to remove confusing code in obj_free(),
combine two atomic ops and improve readability for async_free_zspage().
More details can be found in the respective changelogs.

This patch (of 2):

OBJ_ALLOCATED_TAG is only set for handle to indicate allocated object.
It's irrelevant with obj. So remove this misleading code to improve
readability.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210624123930.1769093-1-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210624123930.1769093-2-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Nitin Gupta <ngupta@vflare.org>
Cc: Sergey Senozhatsky <senozhatsky@chromium.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

46b76f2e 30-Jun-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/zswap.c: fix two bugs in zswap_writeback_entry()

In the ZSWAP_SWAPCACHE_FAIL and ZSWAP_SWAPCACHE_EXIST case, we forgot to
call zpool_unmap_handle() when zpool can't sleep. And we might sleep in
zswap_get_swap_cache_page() while zpool can't sleep. To fix all of these,
zpool_unmap_handle() should be done before zswap_get_swap_cache_page()
when zpool can't sleep.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210522092242.3233191-4-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Fixes: fc6697a89f56 ("mm/zswap: add the flag can_sleep_mapped")
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Colin Ian King <colin.king@canonical.com>
Cc: Dan Streetman <ddstreet@ieee.org>
Cc: Nathan Chancellor <nathan@kernel.org>
Cc: Sebastian Andrzej Siewior <bigeasy@linutronix.de>
Cc: Seth Jennings <sjenning@redhat.com>
Cc: Tian Tao <tiantao6@hisilicon.com>
Cc: Vitaly Wool <vitaly.wool@konsulko.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

ae34af1f 30-Jun-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/zswap.c: avoid unnecessary copy-in at map time

The buf mapped via zpool_map_handle() is only used to store compressed
page buffer and there is no information to extract from it. So we could
use ZPOOL_MM_WO instead to avoid unnecessary copy-in at map time.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210522092242.3233191-3-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Colin Ian King <colin.king@canonical.com>
Cc: Dan Streetman <ddstreet@ieee.org>
Cc: Nathan Chancellor <nathan@kernel.org>
Cc: Sebastian Andrzej Siewior <bigeasy@linutronix.de>
Cc: Seth Jennings <sjenning@redhat.com>
Cc: Tian Tao <tiantao6@hisilicon.com>
Cc: Vitaly Wool <vitaly.wool@konsulko.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

2c1e9a2c 30-Jun-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/zswap.c: remove unused function zswap_debugfs_exit()

Patch series "Cleanup and fixup for zswap".

This series contains cleanups to remove unused function and avoid
unnecessary copy-in at map time. Also this fixes two bugs in the function
zswap_writeback_entry(). More details can be found in the respective
changelogs.

This patch (of 3):

zswap_debugfs_exit() is unused, remove it.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210522092242.3233191-1-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210522092242.3233191-2-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Seth Jennings <sjenning@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Streetman <ddstreet@ieee.org>
Cc: Vitaly Wool <vitaly.wool@konsulko.com>
Cc: Sebastian Andrzej Siewior <bigeasy@linutronix.de>
Cc: Nathan Chancellor <nathan@kernel.org>
Cc: Colin Ian King <colin.king@canonical.com>
Cc: Tian Tao <tiantao6@hisilicon.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

27cacaad 30-Jun-2021 Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>

mm,memory_hotplug: drop unneeded locking

Currently, memory-hotplug code takes zone's span_writelock and pgdat's
resize_lock when resizing the node/zone's spanned pages via
{move_pfn_range_to_zone(),remove_pfn_range_from_zone()} and when resizing
node and zone's present pages via adjust_present_page_count().

These locks are also taken during the initialization of the system at boot
time, where it protects parallel struct page initialization, but they
should not really be needed in memory-hotplug where all operations are a)
synchronized on device level and b) serialized by the mem_hotplug_lock
lock.

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: remove now-unused locals]

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210531093958.15021-1-osalvador@suse.de
Signed-off-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Acked-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Pavel Tatashin <pasha.tatashin@soleen.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

786dee86 30-Jun-2021 Liam Mark <lmark@codeaurora.org>

mm/memory_hotplug: rate limit page migration warnings

When offlining memory the system can attempt to migrate a lot of pages, if
there are problems with migration this can flood the logs. Printing all
the data hogs the CPU and cause some RT threads to run for a long time,
which may have some bad consequences.

Rate limit the page migration warnings in order to avoid this.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210505140542.24935-1-georgi.djakov@linaro.org
Signed-off-by: Liam Mark <lmark@codeaurora.org>
Signed-off-by: Georgi Djakov <georgi.djakov@linaro.org>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

4ca9b385 30-Jun-2021 David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>

mm/madvise: introduce MADV_POPULATE_(READ|WRITE) to prefault page tables

I. Background: Sparse Memory Mappings

When we manage sparse memory mappings dynamically in user space - also
sometimes involving MAP_NORESERVE - we want to dynamically populate/
discard memory inside such a sparse memory region. Example users are
hypervisors (especially implementing memory ballooning or similar
technologies like virtio-mem) and memory allocators. In addition, we want
to fail in a nice way (instead of generating SIGBUS) if populating does
not succeed because we are out of backend memory (which can happen easily
with file-based mappings, especially tmpfs and hugetlbfs).

While MADV_DONTNEED, MADV_REMOVE and FALLOC_FL_PUNCH_HOLE allow for
reliably discarding memory for most mapping types, there is no generic
approach to populate page tables and preallocate memory.

Although mmap() supports MAP_POPULATE, it is not applicable to the concept
of sparse memory mappings, where we want to populate/discard dynamically
and avoid expensive/problematic remappings. In addition, we never
actually report errors during the final populate phase - it is best-effort
only.

fallocate() can be used to preallocate file-based memory and fail in a
safe way. However, it cannot really be used for any private mappings on
anonymous files via memfd due to COW semantics. In addition, fallocate()
does not actually populate page tables, so we still always get pagefaults
on first access - which is sometimes undesired (i.e., real-time workloads)
and requires real prefaulting of page tables, not just a preallocation of
backend storage. There might be interesting use cases for sparse memory
regions along with mlockall(MCL_ONFAULT) which fallocate() cannot satisfy
as it does not prefault page tables.

II. On preallcoation/prefaulting from user space

Because we don't have a proper interface, what applications (like QEMU and
databases) end up doing is touching (i.e., reading+writing one byte to not
overwrite existing data) all individual pages.

However, that approach
1) Can result in wear on storage backing, because we end up reading/writing
each page; this is especially a problem for dax/pmem.
2) Can result in mmap_sem contention when prefaulting via multiple
threads.
3) Requires expensive signal handling, especially to catch SIGBUS in case
of hugetlbfs/shmem/file-backed memory. For example, this is
problematic in hypervisors like QEMU where SIGBUS handlers might already
be used by other subsystems concurrently to e.g, handle hardware errors.
"Simply" doing preallocation concurrently from other thread is not that
easy.

III. On MADV_WILLNEED

Extending MADV_WILLNEED is not an option because
1. It would change the semantics: "Expect access in the near future." and
"might be a good idea to read some pages" vs. "Definitely populate/
preallocate all memory and definitely fail on errors.".
2. Existing users (like virtio-balloon in QEMU when deflating the balloon)
don't want populate/prealloc semantics. They treat this rather as a hint
to give a little performance boost without too much overhead - and don't
expect that a lot of memory might get consumed or a lot of time
might be spent.

IV. MADV_POPULATE_READ and MADV_POPULATE_WRITE

Let's introduce MADV_POPULATE_READ and MADV_POPULATE_WRITE, inspired by
MAP_POPULATE, with the following semantics:
1. MADV_POPULATE_READ can be used to prefault page tables just like
manually reading each individual page. This will not break any COW
mappings. The shared zero page might get mapped and no backend storage
might get preallocated -- allocation might be deferred to
write-fault time. Especially shared file mappings require an explicit
fallocate() upfront to actually preallocate backend memory (blocks in
the file system) in case the file might have holes.
2. If MADV_POPULATE_READ succeeds, all page tables have been populated
(prefaulted) readable once.
3. MADV_POPULATE_WRITE can be used to preallocate backend memory and
prefault page tables just like manually writing (or
reading+writing) each individual page. This will break any COW
mappings -- e.g., the shared zeropage is never populated.
4. If MADV_POPULATE_WRITE succeeds, all page tables have been populated
(prefaulted) writable once.
5. MADV_POPULATE_READ and MADV_POPULATE_WRITE cannot be applied to special
mappings marked with VM_PFNMAP and VM_IO. Also, proper access
permissions (e.g., PROT_READ, PROT_WRITE) are required. If any such
mapping is encountered, madvise() fails with -EINVAL.
6. If MADV_POPULATE_READ or MADV_POPULATE_WRITE fails, some page tables
might have been populated.
7. MADV_POPULATE_READ and MADV_POPULATE_WRITE will return -EHWPOISON
when encountering a HW poisoned page in the range.
8. Similar to MAP_POPULATE, MADV_POPULATE_READ and MADV_POPULATE_WRITE
cannot protect from the OOM (Out Of Memory) handler killing the
process.

While the use case for MADV_POPULATE_WRITE is fairly obvious (i.e.,
preallocate memory and prefault page tables for VMs), one issue is that
whenever we prefault pages writable, the pages have to be marked dirty,
because the CPU could dirty them any time. while not a real problem for
hugetlbfs or dax/pmem, it can be a problem for shared file mappings: each
page will be marked dirty and has to be written back later when evicting.

MADV_POPULATE_READ allows for optimizing this scenario: Pre-read a whole
mapping from backend storage without marking it dirty, such that eviction
won't have to write it back. As discussed above, shared file mappings
might require an explciit fallocate() upfront to achieve
preallcoation+prepopulation.

Although sparse memory mappings are the primary use case, this will also
be useful for other preallocate/prefault use cases where MAP_POPULATE is
not desired or the semantics of MAP_POPULATE are not sufficient: as one
example, QEMU users can trigger preallocation/prefaulting of guest RAM
after the mapping was created -- and don't want errors to be silently
suppressed.

Looking at the history, MADV_POPULATE was already proposed in 2013 [1],
however, the main motivation back than was performance improvements --
which should also still be the case.

V. Single-threaded performance comparison

I did a short experiment, prefaulting page tables on completely *empty
mappings/files* and repeated the experiment 10 times. The results
correspond to the shortest execution time. In general, the performance
benefit for huge pages is negligible with small mappings.

V.1: Private mappings

POPULATE_READ and POPULATE_WRITE is fastest. Note that
Reading/POPULATE_READ will populate the shared zeropage where applicable
-- which result in short population times.

The fastest way to allocate backend storage (here: swap or huge pages) and
prefault page tables is POPULATE_WRITE.

V.2: Shared mappings

fallocate() is fastest, however, doesn't prefault page tables.
POPULATE_WRITE is faster than simple writes and read/writes.
POPULATE_READ is faster than simple reads.

Without a fd, the fastest way to allocate backend storage and prefault
page tables is POPULATE_WRITE. With an fd, the fastest way is usually
FALLOCATE+POPULATE_READ or FALLOCATE+POPULATE_WRITE respectively; one
exception are actual files: FALLOCATE+Read is slightly faster than
FALLOCATE+POPULATE_READ.

The fastest way to allocate backend storage prefault page tables is
FALLOCATE+POPULATE_WRITE -- except when dealing with actual files; then,
FALLOCATE+POPULATE_READ is fastest and won't directly mark all pages as
dirty.

v.3: Detailed results

==================================================
2 MiB MAP_PRIVATE:
**************************************************
Anon 4 KiB : Read : 0.119 ms
Anon 4 KiB : Write : 0.222 ms
Anon 4 KiB : Read/Write : 0.380 ms
Anon 4 KiB : POPULATE_READ : 0.060 ms
Anon 4 KiB : POPULATE_WRITE : 0.158 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : Read : 0.034 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : Write : 0.310 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : Read/Write : 0.362 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : POPULATE_READ : 0.039 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : POPULATE_WRITE : 0.229 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : Read : 0.030 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : Write : 0.030 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : Read/Write : 0.030 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : POPULATE_READ : 0.030 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : POPULATE_WRITE : 0.030 ms
tmpfs : Read : 0.033 ms
tmpfs : Write : 0.313 ms
tmpfs : Read/Write : 0.406 ms
tmpfs : POPULATE_READ : 0.039 ms
tmpfs : POPULATE_WRITE : 0.285 ms
file : Read : 0.033 ms
file : Write : 0.351 ms
file : Read/Write : 0.408 ms
file : POPULATE_READ : 0.039 ms
file : POPULATE_WRITE : 0.290 ms
hugetlbfs : Read : 0.030 ms
hugetlbfs : Write : 0.030 ms
hugetlbfs : Read/Write : 0.030 ms
hugetlbfs : POPULATE_READ : 0.030 ms
hugetlbfs : POPULATE_WRITE : 0.030 ms
**************************************************
4096 MiB MAP_PRIVATE:
**************************************************
Anon 4 KiB : Read : 237.940 ms
Anon 4 KiB : Write : 708.409 ms
Anon 4 KiB : Read/Write : 1054.041 ms
Anon 4 KiB : POPULATE_READ : 124.310 ms
Anon 4 KiB : POPULATE_WRITE : 572.582 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : Read : 136.928 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : Write : 963.898 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : Read/Write : 1106.561 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : POPULATE_READ : 78.450 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : POPULATE_WRITE : 805.881 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : Read : 357.116 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : Write : 357.210 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : Read/Write : 357.606 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : POPULATE_READ : 356.094 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : POPULATE_WRITE : 356.937 ms
tmpfs : Read : 137.536 ms
tmpfs : Write : 954.362 ms
tmpfs : Read/Write : 1105.954 ms
tmpfs : POPULATE_READ : 80.289 ms
tmpfs : POPULATE_WRITE : 822.826 ms
file : Read : 137.874 ms
file : Write : 987.025 ms
file : Read/Write : 1107.439 ms
file : POPULATE_READ : 80.413 ms
file : POPULATE_WRITE : 857.622 ms
hugetlbfs : Read : 355.607 ms
hugetlbfs : Write : 355.729 ms
hugetlbfs : Read/Write : 356.127 ms
hugetlbfs : POPULATE_READ : 354.585 ms
hugetlbfs : POPULATE_WRITE : 355.138 ms
**************************************************
2 MiB MAP_SHARED:
**************************************************
Anon 4 KiB : Read : 0.394 ms
Anon 4 KiB : Write : 0.348 ms
Anon 4 KiB : Read/Write : 0.400 ms
Anon 4 KiB : POPULATE_READ : 0.326 ms
Anon 4 KiB : POPULATE_WRITE : 0.273 ms
Anon 2 MiB : Read : 0.030 ms
Anon 2 MiB : Write : 0.030 ms
Anon 2 MiB : Read/Write : 0.030 ms
Anon 2 MiB : POPULATE_READ : 0.030 ms
Anon 2 MiB : POPULATE_WRITE : 0.030 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : Read : 0.412 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : Write : 0.372 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : Read/Write : 0.419 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : POPULATE_READ : 0.343 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : POPULATE_WRITE : 0.288 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : FALLOCATE : 0.137 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : FALLOCATE+Read : 0.446 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : FALLOCATE+Write : 0.330 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : FALLOCATE+Read/Write : 0.454 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : FALLOCATE+POPULATE_READ : 0.379 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : FALLOCATE+POPULATE_WRITE : 0.268 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : Read : 0.030 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : Write : 0.030 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : Read/Write : 0.030 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : POPULATE_READ : 0.030 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : POPULATE_WRITE : 0.030 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : FALLOCATE : 0.030 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : FALLOCATE+Read : 0.031 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : FALLOCATE+Write : 0.031 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : FALLOCATE+Read/Write : 0.031 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : FALLOCATE+POPULATE_READ : 0.030 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : FALLOCATE+POPULATE_WRITE : 0.030 ms
tmpfs : Read : 0.416 ms
tmpfs : Write : 0.369 ms
tmpfs : Read/Write : 0.425 ms
tmpfs : POPULATE_READ : 0.346 ms
tmpfs : POPULATE_WRITE : 0.295 ms
tmpfs : FALLOCATE : 0.139 ms
tmpfs : FALLOCATE+Read : 0.447 ms
tmpfs : FALLOCATE+Write : 0.333 ms
tmpfs : FALLOCATE+Read/Write : 0.454 ms
tmpfs : FALLOCATE+POPULATE_READ : 0.380 ms
tmpfs : FALLOCATE+POPULATE_WRITE : 0.272 ms
file : Read : 0.191 ms
file : Write : 0.511 ms
file : Read/Write : 0.524 ms
file : POPULATE_READ : 0.196 ms
file : POPULATE_WRITE : 0.434 ms
file : FALLOCATE : 0.004 ms
file : FALLOCATE+Read : 0.197 ms
file : FALLOCATE+Write : 0.554 ms
file : FALLOCATE+Read/Write : 0.480 ms
file : FALLOCATE+POPULATE_READ : 0.201 ms
file : FALLOCATE+POPULATE_WRITE : 0.381 ms
hugetlbfs : Read : 0.030 ms
hugetlbfs : Write : 0.030 ms
hugetlbfs : Read/Write : 0.030 ms
hugetlbfs : POPULATE_READ : 0.030 ms
hugetlbfs : POPULATE_WRITE : 0.030 ms
hugetlbfs : FALLOCATE : 0.030 ms
hugetlbfs : FALLOCATE+Read : 0.031 ms
hugetlbfs : FALLOCATE+Write : 0.031 ms
hugetlbfs : FALLOCATE+Read/Write : 0.030 ms
hugetlbfs : FALLOCATE+POPULATE_READ : 0.030 ms
hugetlbfs : FALLOCATE+POPULATE_WRITE : 0.030 ms
**************************************************
4096 MiB MAP_SHARED:
**************************************************
Anon 4 KiB : Read : 1053.090 ms
Anon 4 KiB : Write : 913.642 ms
Anon 4 KiB : Read/Write : 1060.350 ms
Anon 4 KiB : POPULATE_READ : 893.691 ms
Anon 4 KiB : POPULATE_WRITE : 782.885 ms
Anon 2 MiB : Read : 358.553 ms
Anon 2 MiB : Write : 358.419 ms
Anon 2 MiB : Read/Write : 357.992 ms
Anon 2 MiB : POPULATE_READ : 357.533 ms
Anon 2 MiB : POPULATE_WRITE : 357.808 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : Read : 1078.144 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : Write : 942.036 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : Read/Write : 1100.391 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : POPULATE_READ : 925.829 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : POPULATE_WRITE : 804.394 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : FALLOCATE : 304.632 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : FALLOCATE+Read : 1163.359 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : FALLOCATE+Write : 933.186 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : FALLOCATE+Read/Write : 1187.304 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : FALLOCATE+POPULATE_READ : 1013.660 ms
Memfd 4 KiB : FALLOCATE+POPULATE_WRITE : 794.560 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : Read : 358.131 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : Write : 358.099 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : Read/Write : 358.250 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : POPULATE_READ : 357.563 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : POPULATE_WRITE : 357.334 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : FALLOCATE : 356.735 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : FALLOCATE+Read : 358.152 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : FALLOCATE+Write : 358.331 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : FALLOCATE+Read/Write : 358.018 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : FALLOCATE+POPULATE_READ : 357.286 ms
Memfd 2 MiB : FALLOCATE+POPULATE_WRITE : 357.523 ms
tmpfs : Read : 1087.265 ms
tmpfs : Write : 950.840 ms
tmpfs : Read/Write : 1107.567 ms
tmpfs : POPULATE_READ : 922.605 ms
tmpfs : POPULATE_WRITE : 810.094 ms
tmpfs : FALLOCATE : 306.320 ms
tmpfs : FALLOCATE+Read : 1169.796 ms
tmpfs : FALLOCATE+Write : 933.730 ms
tmpfs : FALLOCATE+Read/Write : 1191.610 ms
tmpfs : FALLOCATE+POPULATE_READ : 1020.474 ms
tmpfs : FALLOCATE+POPULATE_WRITE : 798.945 ms
file : Read : 654.101 ms
file : Write : 1259.142 ms
file : Read/Write : 1289.509 ms
file : POPULATE_READ : 661.642 ms
file : POPULATE_WRITE : 1106.816 ms
file : FALLOCATE : 1.864 ms
file : FALLOCATE+Read : 656.328 ms
file : FALLOCATE+Write : 1153.300 ms
file : FALLOCATE+Read/Write : 1180.613 ms
file : FALLOCATE+POPULATE_READ : 668.347 ms
file : FALLOCATE+POPULATE_WRITE : 996.143 ms
hugetlbfs : Read : 357.245 ms
hugetlbfs : Write : 357.413 ms
hugetlbfs : Read/Write : 357.120 ms
hugetlbfs : POPULATE_READ : 356.321 ms
hugetlbfs : POPULATE_WRITE : 356.693 ms
hugetlbfs : FALLOCATE : 355.927 ms
hugetlbfs : FALLOCATE+Read : 357.074 ms
hugetlbfs : FALLOCATE+Write : 357.120 ms
hugetlbfs : FALLOCATE+Read/Write : 356.983 ms
hugetlbfs : FALLOCATE+POPULATE_READ : 356.413 ms
hugetlbfs : FALLOCATE+POPULATE_WRITE : 356.266 ms
**************************************************

[1] https://lkml.org/lkml/2013/6/27/698

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding style fixes]

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210419135443.12822-3-david@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Jann Horn <jannh@google.com>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@ziepe.ca>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Michael S. Tsirkin <mst@redhat.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Richard Henderson <rth@twiddle.net>
Cc: Ivan Kokshaysky <ink@jurassic.park.msu.ru>
Cc: Matt Turner <mattst88@gmail.com>
Cc: Thomas Bogendoerfer <tsbogend@alpha.franken.de>
Cc: "James E.J. Bottomley" <James.Bottomley@HansenPartnership.com>
Cc: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de>
Cc: Chris Zankel <chris@zankel.net>
Cc: Max Filippov <jcmvbkbc@gmail.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Rolf Eike Beer <eike-kernel@sf-tec.de>
Cc: Ram Pai <linuxram@us.ibm.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

a78f1ccd 30-Jun-2021 David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>

mm: make variable names for populate_vma_page_range() consistent

Patch series "mm/madvise: introduce MADV_POPULATE_(READ|WRITE) to prefault page tables", v2.

Excessive details on MADV_POPULATE_(READ|WRITE) can be found in patch #2.

This patch (of 5):

Let's make the variable names in the function declaration match the
variable names used in the definition.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210419135443.12822-1-david@redhat.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210419135443.12822-2-david@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@ziepe.ca>
Cc: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Cc: Chris Zankel <chris@zankel.net>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com>
Cc: Helge Deller <deller@gmx.de>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Ivan Kokshaysky <ink@jurassic.park.msu.ru>
Cc: "James E.J. Bottomley" <James.Bottomley@HansenPartnership.com>
Cc: Jann Horn <jannh@google.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Matt Turner <mattst88@gmail.com>
Cc: Max Filippov <jcmvbkbc@gmail.com>
Cc: Michael S. Tsirkin <mst@redhat.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Ram Pai <linuxram@us.ibm.com>
Cc: Richard Henderson <rth@twiddle.net>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Rolf Eike Beer <eike-kernel@sf-tec.de>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Thomas Bogendoerfer <tsbogend@alpha.franken.de>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

63703f37 30-Jun-2021 Kefeng Wang <wangkefeng.wang@huawei.com>

mm: generalize ZONE_[DMA|DMA32]

ZONE_[DMA|DMA32] configs have duplicate definitions on platforms that
subscribe to them. Instead, just make them generic options which can be
selected on applicable platforms.

Also only x86/arm64 architectures could enable both ZONE_DMA and
ZONE_DMA32 if EXPERT, add ARCH_HAS_ZONE_DMA_SET to make dma zone
configurable and visible on the two architectures.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210528074557.17768-1-wangkefeng.wang@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Kefeng Wang <wangkefeng.wang@huawei.com>
Acked-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> [arm64]
Acked-by: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org> [m68k]
Acked-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Acked-by: Palmer Dabbelt <palmerdabbelt@google.com> [RISC-V]
Acked-by: Michal Simek <michal.simek@xilinx.com> [microblaze]
Acked-by: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au> [powerpc]
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org>
Cc: Thomas Bogendoerfer <tsbogend@alpha.franken.de>
Cc: "David S. Miller" <davem@davemloft.net>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Richard Henderson <rth@twiddle.net>
Cc: Russell King <linux@armlinux.org.uk>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

db1d9152 30-Jun-2021 Liam Howlett <liam.howlett@oracle.com>

mm/nommu: unexport do_munmap()

do_munmap() does not take the mmap_write_lock(). vm_munmap() should be
used instead.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210604194002.648037-1-Liam.Howlett@Oracle.com
Signed-off-by: Liam R. Howlett <Liam.Howlett@Oracle.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Reviewed-by: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

176056fd 30-Jun-2021 Chen Li <chenli@uniontech.com>

nommu: remove __GFP_HIGHMEM in vmalloc/vzalloc

mm/nommu.c:
void *__vmalloc(unsigned long size, gfp_t gfp_mask)
{
/*
* You can't specify __GFP_HIGHMEM with kmalloc() since kmalloc()
* returns only a logical address.
*/
return kmalloc(size, (gfp_mask | __GFP_COMP) & ~__GFP_HIGHMEM);
}

nommu's __vmalloc just uses kmalloc internally and elimitates
__GFP_HIGHMEM, so it makes no sense to add __GFP_HIGHMEM for nommu's
vmalloc/vzalloc.

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding style fixes]

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/875z00rnp8.wl-chenli@uniontech.com
Signed-off-by: Chen Li <chenli@uniontech.com>
Reviewed-by: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Greg Ungerer <gerg@linux-m68k.org>
Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

1212e00c 30-Jun-2021 Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>

mm/thp: fix strncpy warning

Using MAX_INPUT_BUF_SZ as the maximum length of the string makes fortify
complain as it thinks the string might be longer than the buffer, and if
it is, we will end up with a "string" that is missing a NUL terminator.
It's trivial to show that 'tok' points to a NUL-terminated string which is
less than MAX_INPUT_BUF_SZ in length, so we may as well just use strcpy()
and avoid the warning.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210615200242.1716568-4-willy@infradead.org
Signed-off-by: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

36af6737 30-Jun-2021 Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>

mm: hwpoison_user_mappings() try_to_unmap() with TTU_SYNC

TTU_SYNC prevents an unlikely race, when try_to_unmap() returns shortly
before the page is accounted as unmapped. It is unlikely to coincide with
hwpoisoning, but now that we have the flag, hwpoison_user_mappings() would
do well to use it.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/329c28ed-95df-9a2c-8893-b444d8a6d340@google.com
Signed-off-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Acked-by: Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>
Cc: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Jue Wang <juew@google.com>
Cc: "Matthew Wilcox (Oracle)" <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Wang Yugui <wangyugui@e16-tech.com>
Cc: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Cc: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

ab02c252 30-Jun-2021 Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>

mm/thp: remap_page() is only needed on anonymous THP

THP splitting's unmap_page() only sets TTU_SPLIT_FREEZE when PageAnon, and
migration entries are only inserted when TTU_MIGRATION (unused here) or
TTU_SPLIT_FREEZE is set: so it's just a waste of time for remap_page() to
search for migration entries to remove when !PageAnon.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/f987bc44-f28e-688d-2424-b4722153ed8@google.com
Fixes: baa355fd3314 ("thp: file pages support for split_huge_page()")
Signed-off-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Jue Wang <juew@google.com>
Cc: "Matthew Wilcox (Oracle)" <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Cc: Wang Yugui <wangyugui@e16-tech.com>
Cc: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

1fb08ac6 30-Jun-2021 Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>

mm: rmap: make try_to_unmap() void function

Currently try_to_unmap() return bool value by checking page_mapcount(),
however this may return false positive since page_mapcount() doesn't check
all subpages of compound page. The total_mapcount() could be used
instead, but its cost is higher since it traverses all subpages.

Actually the most callers of try_to_unmap() don't care about the return
value at all. So just need check if page is still mapped by page_mapped()
when necessary. And page_mapped() does bail out early when it finds
mapped subpage.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/bb27e3fe-6036-b637-5086-272befbfe3da@google.com
Suggested-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Reviewed-by: Shakeel Butt <shakeelb@google.com>
Acked-by: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Acked-by: Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>
Cc: Alistair Popple <apopple@nvidia.com>
Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Jue Wang <juew@google.com>
Cc: "Matthew Wilcox (Oracle)" <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: Wang Yugui <wangyugui@e16-tech.com>
Cc: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

e346e668 30-Jun-2021 Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>

mm: thp: skip make PMD PROT_NONE if THP migration is not supported

A quick grep shows x86_64, PowerPC (book3s), ARM64 and S390 support both
NUMA balancing and THP. But S390 doesn't support THP migration so NUMA
balancing actually can't migrate any misplaced pages.

Skip make PMD PROT_NONE for such case otherwise CPU cycles may be wasted
by pointless NUMA hinting faults on S390.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210518200801.7413-8-shy828301@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Christian Borntraeger <borntraeger@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Gerald Schaefer <gerald.schaefer@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <hca@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Vasily Gorbik <gor@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

662aeea7 30-Jun-2021 Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>

mm: migrate: check mapcount for THP instead of refcount

The generic migration path will check refcount, so no need check refcount
here. But the old code actually prevents from migrating shared THP
(mapped by multiple processes), so bail out early if mapcount is > 1 to
keep the behavior.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210518200801.7413-7-shy828301@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Cc: Christian Borntraeger <borntraeger@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Gerald Schaefer <gerald.schaefer@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <hca@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Vasily Gorbik <gor@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

b0b515bf 30-Jun-2021 Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>

mm: migrate: don't split THP for misplaced NUMA page

The old behavior didn't split THP if migration is failed due to lack of
memory on the target node. But the THP migration does split THP, so keep
the old behavior for misplaced NUMA page migration.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210518200801.7413-6-shy828301@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Christian Borntraeger <borntraeger@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Gerald Schaefer <gerald.schaefer@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <hca@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Vasily Gorbik <gor@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

c5fc5c3a 30-Jun-2021 Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>

mm: migrate: account THP NUMA migration counters correctly

Now both base page and THP NUMA migration is done via
migrate_misplaced_page(), keep the counters correctly for THP.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210518200801.7413-5-shy828301@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Christian Borntraeger <borntraeger@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Gerald Schaefer <gerald.schaefer@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <hca@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Vasily Gorbik <gor@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

c5b5a3dd 30-Jun-2021 Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>

mm: thp: refactor NUMA fault handling

When the THP NUMA fault support was added THP migration was not supported
yet. So the ad hoc THP migration was implemented in NUMA fault handling.
Since v4.14 THP migration has been supported so it doesn't make too much
sense to still keep another THP migration implementation rather than using
the generic migration code.

This patch reworks the NUMA fault handling to use generic migration
implementation to migrate misplaced page. There is no functional change.

After the refactor the flow of NUMA fault handling looks just like its
PTE counterpart:
Acquire ptl
Prepare for migration (elevate page refcount)
Release ptl
Isolate page from lru and elevate page refcount
Migrate the misplaced THP

If migration fails just restore the old normal PMD.

In the old code anon_vma lock was needed to serialize THP migration
against THP split, but since then the THP code has been reworked a lot, it
seems anon_vma lock is not required anymore to avoid the race.

The page refcount elevation when holding ptl should prevent from THP
split.

Use migrate_misplaced_page() for both base page and THP NUMA hinting fault
and remove all the dead and duplicate code.

[dan.carpenter@oracle.com: fix a double unlock bug]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/YLX8uYN01JmfLnlK@mwanda

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210518200801.7413-4-shy828301@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Dan Carpenter <dan.carpenter@oracle.com>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Christian Borntraeger <borntraeger@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Gerald Schaefer <gerald.schaefer@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <hca@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Vasily Gorbik <gor@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

f4c0d836 30-Jun-2021 Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>

mm: memory: make numa_migrate_prep() non-static

The numa_migrate_prep() will be used by huge NUMA fault as well in the
following patch, make it non-static.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210518200801.7413-3-shy828301@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Christian Borntraeger <borntraeger@de.ibm.com>
Cc: Gerald Schaefer <gerald.schaefer@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <hca@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Vasily Gorbik <gor@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

5db4f15c 30-Jun-2021 Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>

mm: memory: add orig_pmd to struct vm_fault

Pach series "mm: thp: use generic THP migration for NUMA hinting fault", v3.

When the THP NUMA fault support was added THP migration was not supported
yet. So the ad hoc THP migration was implemented in NUMA fault handling.
Since v4.14 THP migration has been supported so it doesn't make too much
sense to still keep another THP migration implementation rather than using
the generic migration code. It is definitely a maintenance burden to keep
two THP migration implementation for different code paths and it is more
error prone. Using the generic THP migration implementation allows us
remove the duplicate code and some hacks needed by the old ad hoc
implementation.

A quick grep shows x86_64, PowerPC (book3s), ARM64 ans S390 support both
THP and NUMA balancing. The most of them support THP migration except for
S390. Zi Yan tried to add THP migration support for S390 before but it
was not accepted due to the design of S390 PMD. For the discussion,
please see: https://lkml.org/lkml/2018/4/27/953.

Per the discussion with Gerald Schaefer in v1 it is acceptible to skip
huge PMD for S390 for now.

I saw there were some hacks about gup from git history, but I didn't
figure out if they have been removed or not since I just found FOLL_NUMA
code in the current gup implementation and they seems useful.

Patch #1 ~ #2 are preparation patches.
Patch #3 is the real meat.
Patch #4 ~ #6 keep consistent counters and behaviors with before.
Patch #7 skips change huge PMD to prot_none if thp migration is not supported.

Test
----
Did some tests to measure the latency of do_huge_pmd_numa_page. The test
VM has 80 vcpus and 64G memory. The test would create 2 processes to
consume 128G memory together which would incur memory pressure to cause
THP splits. And it also creates 80 processes to hog cpu, and the memory
consumer processes are bound to different nodes periodically in order to
increase NUMA faults.

The below test script is used:

echo 3 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches

# Run stress-ng for 24 hours
./stress-ng/stress-ng --vm 2 --vm-bytes 64G --timeout 24h &
PID=$!

./stress-ng/stress-ng --cpu $NR_CPUS --timeout 24h &

# Wait for vm stressors forked
sleep 5

PID_1=`pgrep -P $PID | awk 'NR == 1'`
PID_2=`pgrep -P $PID | awk 'NR == 2'`

JOB1=`pgrep -P $PID_1`
JOB2=`pgrep -P $PID_2`

# Bind load jobs to different nodes periodically to force generate
# cross node memory access
while [ -d "/proc/$PID" ]
do
taskset -apc 8 $JOB1
taskset -apc 8 $JOB2
sleep 300
taskset -apc 58 $JOB1
taskset -apc 58 $JOB2
sleep 300
done

With the above test the histogram of latency of do_huge_pmd_numa_page is
as shown below. Since the number of do_huge_pmd_numa_page varies
drastically for each run (should be due to scheduler), so I converted the
raw number to percentage.

patched base
@us[stress-ng]:
[0] 3.57% 0.16%
[1] 55.68% 18.36%
[2, 4) 10.46% 40.44%
[4, 8) 7.26% 17.82%
[8, 16) 21.12% 13.41%
[16, 32) 1.06% 4.27%
[32, 64) 0.56% 4.07%
[64, 128) 0.16% 0.35%
[128, 256) < 0.1% < 0.1%
[256, 512) < 0.1% < 0.1%
[512, 1K) < 0.1% < 0.1%
[1K, 2K) < 0.1% < 0.1%
[2K, 4K) < 0.1% < 0.1%
[4K, 8K) < 0.1% < 0.1%
[8K, 16K) < 0.1% < 0.1%
[16K, 32K) < 0.1% < 0.1%
[32K, 64K) < 0.1% < 0.1%

Per the result, patched kernel is even slightly better than the base
kernel. I think this is because the lock contention against THP split is
less than base kernel due to the refactor.

To exclude the affect from THP split, I also did test w/o memory pressure.
No obvious regression is spotted. The below is the test result *w/o*
memory pressure.

patched base
@us[stress-ng]:
[0] 7.97% 18.4%
[1] 69.63% 58.24%
[2, 4) 4.18% 2.63%
[4, 8) 0.22% 0.17%
[8, 16) 1.03% 0.92%
[16, 32) 0.14% < 0.1%
[32, 64) < 0.1% < 0.1%
[64, 128) < 0.1% < 0.1%
[128, 256) < 0.1% < 0.1%
[256, 512) 0.45% 1.19%
[512, 1K) 15.45% 17.27%
[1K, 2K) < 0.1% < 0.1%
[2K, 4K) < 0.1% < 0.1%
[4K, 8K) < 0.1% < 0.1%
[8K, 16K) 0.86% 0.88%
[16K, 32K) < 0.1% 0.15%
[32K, 64K) < 0.1% < 0.1%
[64K, 128K) < 0.1% < 0.1%
[128K, 256K) < 0.1% < 0.1%

The series also survived a series of tests that exercise NUMA balancing
migrations by Mel.

This patch (of 7):

Add orig_pmd to struct vm_fault so the "orig_pmd" parameter used by huge
page fault could be removed, just like its PTE counterpart does.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210518200801.7413-1-shy828301@gmail.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210518200801.7413-2-shy828301@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Cc: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Gerald Schaefer <gerald.schaefer@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Heiko Carstens <hca@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Vasily Gorbik <gor@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Christian Borntraeger <borntraeger@de.ibm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

eb6ecbed 30-Jun-2021 Collin Fijalkovich <cfijalkovich@google.com>

mm, thp: relax the VM_DENYWRITE constraint on file-backed THPs

Transparent huge pages are supported for read-only non-shmem files, but
are only used for vmas with VM_DENYWRITE. This condition ensures that
file THPs are protected from writes while an application is running
(ETXTBSY). Any existing file THPs are then dropped from the page cache
when a file is opened for write in do_dentry_open(). Since sys_mmap
ignores MAP_DENYWRITE, this constrains the use of file THPs to vmas
produced by execve().

Systems that make heavy use of shared libraries (e.g. Android) are unable
to apply VM_DENYWRITE through the dynamic linker, preventing them from
benefiting from the resultant reduced contention on the TLB.

This patch reduces the constraint on file THPs allowing use with any
executable mapping from a file not opened for write (see
inode_is_open_for_write()). It also introduces additional conditions to
ensure that files opened for write will never be backed by file THPs.

Restricting the use of THPs to executable mappings eliminates the risk
that a read-only file later opened for write would encounter significant
latencies due to page cache truncation.

The ld linker flag '-z max-page-size=(hugepage size)' can be used to
produce executables with the necessary layout. The dynamic linker must
map these file's segments at a hugepage size aligned vma for the mapping
to be backed with THPs.

Comparison of the performance characteristics of 4KB and 2MB-backed
libraries follows; the Android dex2oat tool was used to AOT compile an
example application on a single ARM core.

4KB Pages:
==========

count event_name # count / runtime
598,995,035,942 cpu-cycles # 1.800861 GHz
81,195,620,851 raw-stall-frontend # 244.112 M/sec
347,754,466,597 iTLB-loads # 1.046 G/sec
2,970,248,900 iTLB-load-misses # 0.854122% miss rate

Total test time: 332.854998 seconds.

2MB Pages:
==========

count event_name # count / runtime
592,872,663,047 cpu-cycles # 1.800358 GHz
76,485,624,143 raw-stall-frontend # 232.261 M/sec
350,478,413,710 iTLB-loads # 1.064 G/sec
803,233,322 iTLB-load-misses # 0.229182% miss rate

Total test time: 329.826087 seconds

A check of /proc/$(pidof dex2oat64)/smaps shows THPs in use:

/apex/com.android.art/lib64/libart.so
FilePmdMapped: 4096 kB

/apex/com.android.art/lib64/libart-compiler.so
FilePmdMapped: 2048 kB

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210406000930.3455850-1-cfijalkovich@google.com
Signed-off-by: Collin Fijalkovich <cfijalkovich@google.com>
Acked-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Reviewed-by: William Kucharski <william.kucharski@oracle.com>
Acked-by: Song Liu <song@kernel.org>
Cc: Suren Baghdasaryan <surenb@google.com>
Cc: Hridya Valsaraju <hridya@google.com>
Cc: Kalesh Singh <kaleshsingh@google.com>
Cc: Tim Murray <timmurray@google.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

6acfb5ba 30-Jun-2021 Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>

mm: migrate: fix missing update page_private to hugetlb_page_subpool

Since commit d6995da31122 ("hugetlb: use page.private for hugetlb specific
page flags") converts page.private for hugetlb specific page flags. We
should use hugetlb_page_subpool() to get the subpool pointer instead of
page_private().

This 'could' prevent the migration of hugetlb pages. page_private(hpage)
is now used for hugetlb page specific flags. At migration time, the only
flag which could be set is HPageVmemmapOptimized. This flag will only be
set if the new vmemmap reduction feature is enabled. In addition,
!page_mapping() implies an anonymous mapping. So, this will prevent
migration of hugetb pages in anonymous mappings if the vmemmap reduction
feature is enabled.

In addition, that if statement checked for the rare race condition of a
page being migrated while in the process of being freed. Since that check
is now wrong, we could leak hugetlb subpool usage counts.

The commit forgot to update it in the page migration routine. So fix it.

[songmuchun@bytedance.com: fix compiler error when !CONFIG_HUGETLB_PAGE reported by Randy]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210521022747.35736-1-songmuchun@bytedance.com

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210520025949.1866-1-songmuchun@bytedance.com
Fixes: d6995da31122 ("hugetlb: use page.private for hugetlb specific page flags")
Signed-off-by: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Reported-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Reviewed-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Tested-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com> [arm64]
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Xiongchun Duan <duanxiongchun@bytedance.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

9092d4f7 30-Jun-2021 Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>

memblock: update initialization of reserved pages

The struct pages representing a reserved memory region are initialized
using reserve_bootmem_range() function. This function is called for each
reserved region just before the memory is freed from memblock to the buddy
page allocator.

The struct pages for MEMBLOCK_NOMAP regions are kept with the default
values set by the memory map initialization which makes it necessary to
have a special treatment for such pages in pfn_valid() and
pfn_valid_within().

Split out initialization of the reserved pages to a function with a
meaningful name and treat the MEMBLOCK_NOMAP regions the same way as the
reserved regions and mark struct pages for the NOMAP regions as
PageReserved.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210511100550.28178-3-rppt@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Acked-by: Ard Biesheuvel <ardb@kernel.org>
Reviewed-by: Kefeng Wang <wangkefeng.wang@huawei.com>
Cc: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com>
Cc: Marc Zyngier <maz@kernel.org>
Cc: Mark Rutland <mark.rutland@arm.com>
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

269fbe72 30-Jun-2021 Ben Widawsky <ben.widawsky@intel.com>

mm/mempolicy: use unified 'nodes' for bind/interleave/prefer policies

Current structure 'mempolicy' uses a union to store the node info for
bind/interleave/perfer policies.

union {
short preferred_node; /* preferred */
nodemask_t nodes; /* interleave/bind */
/* undefined for default */
} v;

Since preferred node can also be represented by a nodemask_t with only ont
bit set, unify these policies with using one nodemask_t 'nodes', which can
remove a union, simplify the code and make it easier to support future's
new policy's node info.

Link: https://lore.kernel.org/r/20200630212517.308045-7-ben.widawsky@intel.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/1623399825-75651-1-git-send-email-feng.tang@intel.com
Co-developed-by: Feng Tang <feng.tang@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Ben Widawsky <ben.widawsky@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Feng Tang <feng.tang@intel.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andi Kleen <ak@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

e5947d23 30-Jun-2021 Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>

mm: mempolicy: don't have to split pmd for huge zero page

When trying to migrate pages to obey mempolicy, the huge zero page is
split by inserting base zero pfn to all PTEs, then the page table walk
fallback to PTE level and just skips zero page. Skipping zero page for
mempolicy has been the behavior of kernel since v2.6.16 due to commit
f4598c8b3678 ("[PATCH] migration: make sure there is no attempt to migrate
reserved pages."). So it seems pointless to split huge zero page, it
could be just skipped like base zero page.

Set ACTION_CONTINUE to prevent the walk_page_range() split the pmd for
this case.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210609172146.3594-1-shy828301@gmail.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210604203513.240709-1-shy828301@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Naoya Horiguchi <nao.horiguchi@gmail.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

95837924 30-Jun-2021 Feng Tang <feng.tang@intel.com>

mm/mempolicy: unify the parameter sanity check for mbind and set_mempolicy

Currently the kernel_mbind() and kernel_set_mempolicy() do almost the same
operation for parameter sanity check.

Add a helper function to unify the code to reduce the redundancy, and make
it easier for changing the sanity check code in future.

[thanks to David Rientjes for suggesting using helper function instead of
macro].

[feng.tang@intel.com: add comment]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/1622560492-1294-4-git-send-email-feng.tang@intel.com

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/1622469956-82897-4-git-send-email-feng.tang@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Feng Tang <feng.tang@intel.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com>
Cc: Ben Widawsky <ben.widawsky@intel.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Andi Kleen <ak@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

7858d7bc 30-Jun-2021 Feng Tang <feng.tang@intel.com>

mm/mempolicy: don't handle MPOL_LOCAL like a fake MPOL_PREFERRED policy

MPOL_LOCAL policy has been setup as a real policy, but it is still handled
like a faked POL_PREFERRED policy with one internal MPOL_F_LOCAL flag bit
set, and there are many places having to judge the real 'prefer' or the
'local' policy, which are quite confusing.

In current code, there are 4 cases that MPOL_LOCAL are used:

1. user specifies 'local' policy

2. user specifies 'prefer' policy, but with empty nodemask

3. system 'default' policy is used

4. 'prefer' policy + valid 'preferred' node with MPOL_F_STATIC_NODES
flag set, and when it is 'rebind' to a nodemask which doesn't contains
the 'preferred' node, it will perform as 'local' policy

So make 'local' a real policy instead of a fake 'prefer' one, and kill
MPOL_F_LOCAL bit, which can greatly reduce the confusion for code reading.

For case 4, the logic of mpol_rebind_preferred() is confusing, as Michal
Hocko pointed out:

: I do believe that rebinding preferred policy is just bogus and it should
: be dropped altogether on the ground that a preference is a mere hint from
: userspace where to start the allocation. Unless I am missing something
: cpusets will be always authoritative for the final placement. The
: preferred node just acts as a starting point and it should be really
: preserved when cpusets changes. Otherwise we have a very subtle behavior
: corner cases.

So dump all the tricky transformation between 'prefer' and 'local', and
just record the new nodemask of rebinding.

[feng.tang@intel.com: fix a problem in mpol_set_nodemask(), per Michal Hocko]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/1622560492-1294-3-git-send-email-feng.tang@intel.com
[feng.tang@intel.com: refine code and comments of mpol_set_nodemask(), per Michal]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210603081807.GE56979@shbuild999.sh.intel.com

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/1622469956-82897-3-git-send-email-feng.tang@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Feng Tang <feng.tang@intel.com>
Suggested-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Andi Kleen <ak@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Ben Widawsky <ben.widawsky@intel.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

b26e517a 30-Jun-2021 Feng Tang <feng.tang@intel.com>

mm/mempolicy: cleanup nodemask intersection check for oom

Patch series "mm/mempolicy: some fix and semantics cleanup", v4.

Current memory policy code has some confusing and ambiguous part about
MPOL_LOCAL policy, as it is handled as a faked MPOL_PREFERRED one, and
there are many places having to distinguish them. Also the nodemask
intersection check needs cleanup to be more explicit for OOM use, and
handle MPOL_INTERLEAVE correctly. This patchset cleans up these and
unifies the parameter sanity check for mbind() and set_mempolicy().

This patch (of 3):

mempolicy_nodemask_intersects seem to be a general purpose mempolicy
function. In fact it is partially tailored for the OOM purpose
instead. The oom proper is the only existing user so rename the
function to make that purpose explicit.

While at it drop the MPOL_INTERLEAVE as those allocations never has a
nodemask defined (see alloc_page_interleave) so this is a dead code and
a confusing one because MPOL_INTERLEAVE is a hint rather than a hard
requirement so it shouldn't be considered during the OOM.

The final code can be reduced to a check for MPOL_BIND which is the
only memory policy that is a hard requirement and thus relevant to a
constrained OOM logic.

[mhocko@suse.com: changelog edits]

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/1622560492-1294-1-git-send-email-feng.tang@intel.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/1622560492-1294-2-git-send-email-feng.tang@intel.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/1622469956-82897-1-git-send-email-feng.tang@intel.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/1622469956-82897-2-git-send-email-feng.tang@intel.com
Signed-off-by: Feng Tang <feng.tang@intel.com>
Suggested-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Andi Kleen <ak@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Ben Widawsky <ben.widawsky@intel.com>
Cc: Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

b55ca526 30-Jun-2021 Wonhyuk Yang <vvghjk1234@gmail.com>

mm/compaction: fix 'limit' in fast_isolate_freepages

Because of 'min(1, ...)', fast_isolate_freepages set 'limit' to 0 or 1.
This takes away the opportunities of find candinate pages. So, by making
enough scans available, increases the probability of finding the
appropriate freepage.

Tested it on the thpscale and the results are as follows.

5.12.0 5.12.0
valnilla patched
Amean fault-both-1 598.15 ( 0.00%) 592.56 ( 0.93%)
Amean fault-both-3 1494.47 ( 0.00%) 1514.35 ( -1.33%)
Amean fault-both-5 2519.48 ( 0.00%) 2471.76 ( 1.89%)
Amean fault-both-7 3173.85 ( 0.00%) 3079.19 ( 2.98%)
Amean fault-both-12 8063.83 ( 0.00%) 7858.29 ( 2.55%)
Amean fault-both-18 8781.20 ( 0.00%) 7827.70 * 10.86%*
Amean fault-both-24 12576.44 ( 0.00%) 12250.20 ( 2.59%)
Amean fault-both-30 18503.27 ( 0.00%) 17528.11 * 5.27%*
Amean fault-both-32 16133.69 ( 0.00%) 13874.24 * 14.00%*

5.12.0 5.12.0
vanilla patched
Ops Compaction migrate scanned 6547133.00 5963901.00
Ops Compaction free scanned 32452453.00 26609101.00

5.12 5.12
vanilla patched
Duration User 27.99 28.84
Duration System 244.08 236.76
Duration Elapsed 78.27 78.38

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210626082443.22547-1-vvghjk1234@gmail.com
Fixes: 5a811889de10f ("mm, compaction: use free lists to quickly locate a migration target")
Signed-off-by: Wonhyuk Yang <vvghjk1234@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Cc: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

d2155fe5 30-Jun-2021 Liu Xiang <liu.xiang@zlingsmart.com>

mm: compaction: remove duplicate !list_empty(&sublist) check

The list_splice_tail(&sublist, freelist) also do !list_empty(&sublist)
check, so remove the duplicate call.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210609095409.19920-1-liu.xiang@zlingsmart.com
Signed-off-by: Liu Xiang <liu.xiang@zlingsmart.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

17adb230 30-Jun-2021 YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>

mm/compaction: use DEVICE_ATTR_WO macro

Use DEVICE_ATTR_WO helper instead of plain DEVICE_ATTR, which makes the
code a bit shorter and easier to read.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210523064521.32912-1-yuehaibing@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

2a03085c 30-Jun-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/zbud: don't export any zbud API

The zbud doesn't need to export any API and it is meant to be used via
zpool API since the commit 12d79d64bfd3 ("mm/zpool: update zswap to use
zpool"). So we can remove the unneeded zbud.h and move down zpool API to
avoid any forward declaration.

[linmiaohe@huawei.com: fix unused function warnings when CONFIG_ZPOOL is disabled]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210619025508.1239386-1-linmiaohe@huawei.com

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210608114515.206992-3-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Dan Streetman <ddstreet@ieee.org>
Cc: Seth Jennings <sjenning@redhat.com>
Cc: Nathan Chancellor <nathan@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

f356aeac 30-Jun-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/zbud: reuse unbuddied[0] as buddied in zbud_pool

Patch series "Cleanups for zbud", v2.

This series contains just cleanups to save some possible memory in
zbud_pool and avoid exporting any unneeded zbud API. More details can be
found in the respective changelogs

This patch (of 2):

Since commit 9d8c5b5284e4 ("mm: zbud: fix condition check on allocation
size"), zbud_pool.unbuddied[0] is always unused. We can reuse it as
buddied field to save some possible memory.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210608114515.206992-1-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210608114515.206992-2-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Seth Jennings <sjenning@redhat.com>
Cc: Dan Streetman <ddstreet@ieee.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

28473d91 30-Jun-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/z3fold: use release_z3fold_page_locked() to release locked z3fold page

We should use release_z3fold_page_locked() to release z3fold page when
it's locked, although it looks harmless to use release_z3fold_page() now.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210619093151.1492174-7-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Fixes: dcf5aedb24f8 ("z3fold: stricter locking and more careful reclaim")
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: Vitaly Wool <vitaly.wool@konsulko.com>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hdanton@sina.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

dac0d1cf 30-Jun-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/z3fold: fix potential memory leak in z3fold_destroy_pool()

There is a memory leak in z3fold_destroy_pool() as it forgets to
free_percpu pool->unbuddied. Call free_percpu for pool->unbuddied to fix
this issue.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210619093151.1492174-6-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Fixes: d30561c56f41 ("z3fold: use per-cpu unbuddied lists")
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: Vitaly Wool <vitaly.wool@konsulko.com>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hdanton@sina.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

767cc6c5 30-Jun-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/z3fold: remove unused function handle_to_z3fold_header()

handle_to_z3fold_header() is unused now. So we can remove it. As a
result, get_z3fold_header() becomes the only caller of
__get_z3fold_header() and the argument lock is always true. Therefore we
could further fold the __get_z3fold_header() into get_z3fold_header() with
lock = true.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210619093151.1492174-5-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: Vitaly Wool <vitaly.wool@konsulko.com>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hdanton@sina.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

e891f60e 30-Jun-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/z3fold: remove magic number in z3fold_create_pool()

It's meaningless to pass a magic number 2 to __alloc_percpu() as there is
a minimum alignment size of PCPU_MIN_ALLOC_SIZE (> 2) in it. Also there
is no special alignment requirement for unbuddied. So we could replace
this magic number with nature alignment, i.e. __alignof__(struct
list_head), to improve readability.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210619093151.1492174-4-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: Vitaly Wool <vitaly.wool@konsulko.com>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hdanton@sina.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

014284a0 30-Jun-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/z3fold: avoid possible underflow in z3fold_alloc()

It is not enough to just make sure the z3fold header is not larger than
the page size. When z3fold header is equal to PAGE_SIZE, we would
underflow when check alloc size against PAGE_SIZE - ZHDR_SIZE_ALIGNED -
CHUNK_SIZE in z3fold_alloc(). Make sure there has remaining spaces for
its buddy to fix this theoretical issue.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210619093151.1492174-3-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: Vitaly Wool <vitaly.wool@konsulko.com>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hdanton@sina.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

e3c0db4f 30-Jun-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/z3fold: define macro NCHUNKS as TOTAL_CHUNKS - ZHDR_CHUNKS

Patch series "Cleanup and fixup for z3fold".

This series contains cleanups to remove unused function, redefine macro to
improve readability and so on. Also this fixes several bugs in z3fold,
such as memory leak in z3fold_destroy_pool(). More details can be found
in the respective changelogs.

This patch (of 6):

To improve code readability, we could define macro NCHUNKS as TOTAL_CHUNKS
- ZHDR_CHUNKS. No functional change intended.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210619093151.1492174-1-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210619093151.1492174-2-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: Vitaly Wool <vitaly.wool@konsulko.com>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hdanton@sina.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

82840451 30-Jun-2021 David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>

mm: introduce page_offline_(begin|end|freeze|thaw) to synchronize setting PageOffline()

A driver might set a page logically offline -- PageOffline() -- and turn
the page inaccessible in the hypervisor; after that, access to page
content can be fatal. One example is virtio-mem; while unplugged memory
-- marked as PageOffline() can currently be read in the hypervisor, this
will no longer be the case in the future; for example, when having a
virtio-mem device backed by huge pages in the hypervisor.

Some special PFN walkers -- i.e., /proc/kcore -- read content of random
pages after checking PageOffline(); however, these PFN walkers can race
with drivers that set PageOffline().

Let's introduce page_offline_(begin|end|freeze|thaw) for synchronizing.

page_offline_freeze()/page_offline_thaw() allows for a subsystem to
synchronize with such drivers, achieving that a page cannot be set
PageOffline() while frozen.

page_offline_begin()/page_offline_end() is used by drivers that care about
such races when setting a page PageOffline().

For simplicity, use a rwsem for now; neither drivers nor users are
performance sensitive.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210526093041.8800-5-david@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Reviewed-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Aili Yao <yaoaili@kingsoft.com>
Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: Alex Shi <alex.shi@linux.alibaba.com>
Cc: Haiyang Zhang <haiyangz@microsoft.com>
Cc: Jason Wang <jasowang@redhat.com>
Cc: Jiri Bohac <jbohac@suse.cz>
Cc: "K. Y. Srinivasan" <kys@microsoft.com>
Cc: "Matthew Wilcox (Oracle)" <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: "Michael S. Tsirkin" <mst@redhat.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>
Cc: Roman Gushchin <guro@fb.com>
Cc: Stephen Hemminger <sthemmin@microsoft.com>
Cc: Steven Price <steven.price@arm.com>
Cc: Wei Liu <wei.liu@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

781eb2cd 30-Jun-2021 Kefeng Wang <wangkefeng.wang@huawei.com>

mm/kconfig: move HOLES_IN_ZONE into mm

commit a55749639dc1 ("ia64: drop marked broken DISCONTIGMEM and
VIRTUAL_MEM_MAP") drop VIRTUAL_MEM_MAP, so there is no need HOLES_IN_ZONE
on ia64.

Also move HOLES_IN_ZONE into mm/Kconfig, select it if architecture needs
this feature.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210417075946.181402-1-wangkefeng.wang@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Kefeng Wang <wangkefeng.wang@huawei.com>
Acked-by: Catalin Marinas <catalin.marinas@arm.com> [arm64]
Cc: Will Deacon <will@kernel.org>
Cc: Thomas Bogendoerfer <tsbogend@alpha.franken.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

3ebc57f4 30-Jun-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm: workingset: define macro WORKINGSET_SHIFT

The magic number 1 is used in several places in workingset.c. Define a
macro WORKINGSET_SHIFT for it to improve code readability.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210624122307.1759342-1-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

2d2b8d2b 30-Jun-2021 Yu Zhao <yuzhao@google.com>

mm/vmscan.c: fix potential deadlock in reclaim_pages()

Theoretically without the protect from memalloc_noreclaim_save() and
memalloc_noreclaim_restore(), reclaim_pages() can go into the block
I/O layer recursively and deadlock.

Querying 'reclaim_pages' in our kernel crash databases didn't yield
any results. So the deadlock seems unlikely to happen. A possible
explanation is that the only user of reclaim_pages(), i.e.,
MADV_PAGEOUT, is usually called before memory pressure builds up,
e.g., on Android and Chrome OS. Under such a condition, allocations in
the block I/O layer can be fulfilled without diverting to direct
reclaim and therefore the recursion is avoided.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210622074642.785473-1-yuzhao@google.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210614194727.2684053-1-yuzhao@google.com
Signed-off-by: Yu Zhao <yuzhao@google.com>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

7d64ae3a 30-Jun-2021 Axel Rasmussen <axelrasmussen@google.com>

userfaultfd/shmem: modify shmem_mfill_atomic_pte to use install_pte()

In a previous commit, we added the mfill_atomic_install_pte() helper.
This helper does the job of setting up PTEs for an existing page, to map
it into a given VMA. It deals with both the anon and shmem cases, as well
as the shared and private cases.

In other words, shmem_mfill_atomic_pte() duplicates a case it already
handles. So, expose it, and let shmem_mfill_atomic_pte() use it directly,
to reduce code duplication.

This requires that we refactor shmem_mfill_atomic_pte() a bit:

Instead of doing accounting (shmem_recalc_inode() et al) part-way through
the PTE setup, do it afterward. This frees up mfill_atomic_install_pte()
from having to care about this accounting, and means we don't need to e.g.
shmem_uncharge() in the error path.

A side effect is this switches shmem_mfill_atomic_pte() to use
lru_cache_add_inactive_or_unevictable() instead of just lru_cache_add().
This wrapper does some extra accounting in an exceptional case, if
appropriate, so it's actually the more correct thing to use.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210503180737.2487560-7-axelrasmussen@google.com
Signed-off-by: Axel Rasmussen <axelrasmussen@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Brian Geffon <bgeffon@google.com>
Cc: "Dr . David Alan Gilbert" <dgilbert@redhat.com>
Cc: Jerome Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill@shutemov.name>
Cc: Lokesh Gidra <lokeshgidra@google.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Mina Almasry <almasrymina@google.com>
Cc: Oliver Upton <oupton@google.com>
Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@fb.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au>
Cc: Wang Qing <wangqing@vivo.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

15313257 30-Jun-2021 Axel Rasmussen <axelrasmussen@google.com>

userfaultfd/shmem: support UFFDIO_CONTINUE for shmem

With this change, userspace can resolve a minor fault within a
shmem-backed area with a UFFDIO_CONTINUE ioctl. The semantics for this
match those for hugetlbfs - we look up the existing page in the page
cache, and install a PTE for it.

This commit introduces a new helper: mfill_atomic_install_pte.

Why handle UFFDIO_CONTINUE for shmem in mm/userfaultfd.c, instead of in
shmem.c? The existing userfault implementation only relies on shmem.c for
VM_SHARED VMAs. However, minor fault handling / CONTINUE work just fine
for !VM_SHARED VMAs as well. We'd prefer to handle CONTINUE for shmem in
one place, regardless of shared/private (to reduce code duplication).

Why add a new mfill_atomic_install_pte helper? A problem we have with
continue is that shmem_mfill_atomic_pte() and mcopy_atomic_pte() are
*close* to what we want, but not exactly. We do want to setup the PTEs in
a CONTINUE operation, but we don't want to e.g. allocate a new page,
charge it (e.g. to the shmem inode), manipulate various flags, etc. Also
we have the problem stated above: shmem_mfill_atomic_pte() and
mcopy_atomic_pte() both handle one-half of the problem (shared / private)
continue cares about. So, introduce mcontinue_atomic_pte(), to handle all
of the shmem continue cases. Introduce the helper so it doesn't duplicate
code with mcopy_atomic_pte().

In a future commit, shmem_mfill_atomic_pte() will also be modified to use
this new helper. However, since this is a bigger refactor, it seems most
clear to do it as a separate change.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210503180737.2487560-5-axelrasmussen@google.com
Signed-off-by: Axel Rasmussen <axelrasmussen@google.com>
Acked-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Acked-by: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Brian Geffon <bgeffon@google.com>
Cc: "Dr . David Alan Gilbert" <dgilbert@redhat.com>
Cc: Jerome Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill@shutemov.name>
Cc: Lokesh Gidra <lokeshgidra@google.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Mina Almasry <almasrymina@google.com>
Cc: Oliver Upton <oupton@google.com>
Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@fb.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au>
Cc: Wang Qing <wangqing@vivo.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

c949b097 30-Jun-2021 Axel Rasmussen <axelrasmussen@google.com>

userfaultfd/shmem: support minor fault registration for shmem

This patch allows shmem-backed VMAs to be registered for minor faults.
Minor faults are appropriately relayed to userspace in the fault path, for
VMAs with the relevant flag.

This commit doesn't hook up the UFFDIO_CONTINUE ioctl for shmem-backed
minor faults, though, so userspace doesn't yet have a way to resolve such
faults.

Because of this, we also don't yet advertise this as a supported feature.
That will be done in a separate commit when the feature is fully
implemented.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210503180737.2487560-4-axelrasmussen@google.com
Signed-off-by: Axel Rasmussen <axelrasmussen@google.com>
Acked-by: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Brian Geffon <bgeffon@google.com>
Cc: "Dr . David Alan Gilbert" <dgilbert@redhat.com>
Cc: Jerome Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill@shutemov.name>
Cc: Lokesh Gidra <lokeshgidra@google.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Mina Almasry <almasrymina@google.com>
Cc: Oliver Upton <oupton@google.com>
Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@fb.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au>
Cc: Wang Qing <wangqing@vivo.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

3460f6e5 30-Jun-2021 Axel Rasmussen <axelrasmussen@google.com>

userfaultfd/shmem: combine shmem_{mcopy_atomic,mfill_zeropage}_pte

Patch series "userfaultfd: add minor fault handling for shmem", v6.

Overview
========

See the series which added minor faults for hugetlbfs [3] for a detailed
overview of minor fault handling in general. This series adds the same
support for shmem-backed areas.

This series is structured as follows:

- Commits 1 and 2 are cleanups.
- Commits 3 and 4 implement the new feature (minor fault handling for shmem).
- Commit 5 advertises that the feature is now available since at this point it's
fully implemented.
- Commit 6 is a final cleanup, modifying an existing code path to re-use a new
helper we've introduced.
- Commits 7, 8, 9, 10 update the userfaultfd selftest to exercise the feature.

Use Case
========

In some cases it is useful to have VM memory backed by tmpfs instead of
hugetlbfs. So, this feature will be used to support the same VM live
migration use case described in my original series.

Additionally, Android folks (Lokesh Gidra <lokeshgidra@google.com>) hope
to optimize the Android Runtime garbage collector using this feature:

"The plan is to use userfaultfd for concurrently compacting the heap.
With this feature, the heap can be shared-mapped at another location where
the GC-thread(s) could continue the compaction operation without the need
to invoke userfault ioctl(UFFDIO_COPY) each time. OTOH, if and when Java
threads get faults on the heap, UFFDIO_CONTINUE can be used to resume
execution. Furthermore, this feature enables updating references in the
'non-moving' portion of the heap efficiently. Without this feature,
uneccessary page copying (ioctl(UFFDIO_COPY)) would be required."

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/patchwork/cover/1388144/
[2] https://lore.kernel.org/patchwork/patch/1408161/
[3] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-fsdevel/20210301222728.176417-1-axelrasmussen@google.com/T/#t

This patch (of 9):

Previously, we did a dance where we had one calling path in userfaultfd.c
(mfill_atomic_pte), but then we split it into two in shmem_fs.h
(shmem_{mcopy_atomic,mfill_zeropage}_pte), and then rejoined into a single
shared function in shmem.c (shmem_mfill_atomic_pte).

This is all a bit overly complex. Just call the single combined shmem
function directly, allowing us to clean up various branches, boilerplate,
etc.

While we're touching this function, two other small cleanup changes:
- offset is equivalent to pgoff, so we can get rid of offset entirely.
- Split two VM_BUG_ON cases into two statements. This means the line
number reported when the BUG is hit specifies exactly which condition
was true.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210503180737.2487560-1-axelrasmussen@google.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210503180737.2487560-3-axelrasmussen@google.com
Signed-off-by: Axel Rasmussen <axelrasmussen@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Brian Geffon <bgeffon@google.com>
Cc: "Dr . David Alan Gilbert" <dgilbert@redhat.com>
Cc: Jerome Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill@shutemov.name>
Cc: Lokesh Gidra <lokeshgidra@google.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Mina Almasry <almasrymina@google.com>
Cc: Oliver Upton <oupton@google.com>
Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@fb.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au>
Cc: Wang Qing <wangqing@vivo.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

8f34f1ea 30-Jun-2021 Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>

mm/userfaultfd: fix uffd-wp special cases for fork()

We tried to do something similar in b569a1760782 ("userfaultfd: wp: drop
_PAGE_UFFD_WP properly when fork") previously, but it's not doing it all
right.. A few fixes around the code path:

1. We were referencing VM_UFFD_WP vm_flags on the _old_ vma rather
than the new vma. That's overlooked in b569a1760782, so it won't work
as expected. Thanks to the recent rework on fork code
(7a4830c380f3a8b3), we can easily get the new vma now, so switch the
checks to that.

2. Dropping the uffd-wp bit in copy_huge_pmd() could be wrong if the
huge pmd is a migration huge pmd. When it happens, instead of using
pmd_uffd_wp(), we should use pmd_swp_uffd_wp(). The fix is simply to
handle them separately.

3. Forget to carry over uffd-wp bit for a write migration huge pmd
entry. This also happens in copy_huge_pmd(), where we converted a
write huge migration entry into a read one.

4. In copy_nonpresent_pte(), drop uffd-wp if necessary for swap ptes.

5. In copy_present_page() when COW is enforced when fork(), we also
need to pass over the uffd-wp bit if VM_UFFD_WP is armed on the new
vma, and when the pte to be copied has uffd-wp bit set.

Remove the comment in copy_present_pte() about this. It won't help a huge
lot to only comment there, but comment everywhere would be an overkill.
Let's assume the commit messages would help.

[peterx@redhat.com: fix a few thp pmd missing uffd-wp bit]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210428225030.9708-4-peterx@redhat.com

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210428225030.9708-3-peterx@redhat.com
Fixes: b569a1760782f ("userfaultfd: wp: drop _PAGE_UFFD_WP properly when fork")
Signed-off-by: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Jerome Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Axel Rasmussen <axelrasmussen@google.com>
Cc: Brian Geffon <bgeffon@google.com>
Cc: "Dr . David Alan Gilbert" <dgilbert@redhat.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill@shutemov.name>
Cc: Lokesh Gidra <lokeshgidra@google.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Mina Almasry <almasrymina@google.com>
Cc: Oliver Upton <oupton@google.com>
Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@fb.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au>
Cc: Wang Qing <wangqing@vivo.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

5fc7a5f6 30-Jun-2021 Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>

mm/thp: simplify copying of huge zero page pmd when fork

Patch series "mm/uffd: Misc fix for uffd-wp and one more test".

This series tries to fix some corner case bugs for uffd-wp on either thp
or fork(). Then it introduced a new test with pagemap/pageout.

Patch layout:

Patch 1: cleanup for THP, it'll slightly simplify the follow up patches
Patch 2-4: misc fixes for uffd-wp here and there; please refer to each patch
Patch 5: add pagemap support for uffd-wp
Patch 6: add pagemap/pageout test for uffd-wp

The last test introduced can also verify some of the fixes in previous
patches, as the test will fail without the fixes. However it's not easy
to verify all the changes in patch 2-4, but hopefully they can still be
properly reviewed.

Note that if considering the ongoing uffd-wp shmem & hugetlbfs work, patch
5 will be incomplete as it's missing e.g. hugetlbfs part or the special
swap pte detection. However that's not needed in this series, and since
that series is still during review, this series does not depend on that
one (the last test only runs with anonymous memory, not file-backed). So
this series can be merged even before that series.

This patch (of 6):

Huge zero page is handled in a special path in copy_huge_pmd(), however it
should share most codes with a normal thp page. Trying to share more code
with it by removing the special path. The only leftover so far is the
huge zero page refcounting (mm_get_huge_zero_page()), because that's
separately done with a global counter.

This prepares for a future patch to modify the huge pmd to be installed,
so that we don't need to duplicate it explicitly into huge zero page case
too.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210428225030.9708-1-peterx@redhat.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210428225030.9708-2-peterx@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill@shutemov.name>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>, peterx@redhat.com
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Cc: Axel Rasmussen <axelrasmussen@google.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Jerome Glisse <jglisse@redhat.com>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Brian Geffon <bgeffon@google.com>
Cc: "Dr . David Alan Gilbert" <dgilbert@redhat.com>
Cc: Joe Perches <joe@perches.com>
Cc: Lokesh Gidra <lokeshgidra@google.com>
Cc: Mina Almasry <almasrymina@google.com>
Cc: Oliver Upton <oupton@google.com>
Cc: Shaohua Li <shli@fb.com>
Cc: Shuah Khan <shuah@kernel.org>
Cc: Stephen Rothwell <sfr@canb.auug.org.au>
Cc: Wang Qing <wangqing@vivo.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

510d25c9 30-Jun-2021 Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>

mm/hwpoison: disable pcp for page_handle_poison()

Recent changes by patch "mm/page_alloc: allow high-order pages to be
stored on the per-cpu lists" makes kernels determine whether to use pcp by
pcp_allowed_order(), which breaks soft-offline for hugetlb pages.

Soft-offline dissolves a migration source page, then removes it from buddy
free list, so it's assumed that any subpage of the soft-offlined hugepage
are recognized as a buddy page just after returning from
dissolve_free_huge_page(). pcp_allowed_order() returns true for hugetlb,
so this assumption is no longer true.

So disable pcp during dissolve_free_huge_page() and take_page_off_buddy()
to prevent soft-offlined hugepages from linking to pcp lists.
Soft-offline should not be common events so the impact on performance
should be minimal. And I think that the optimization of Mel's patch could
benefit to hugetlb so zone_pcp_disable() is called only in hwpoison
context.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210617092626.291006-1-nao.horiguchi@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

7118fc29 30-Jun-2021 Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>

hugetlb: address ref count racing in prep_compound_gigantic_page

In [1], Jann Horn points out a possible race between
prep_compound_gigantic_page and __page_cache_add_speculative. The root
cause of the possible race is prep_compound_gigantic_page uncondittionally
setting the ref count of pages to zero. It does this because
prep_compound_gigantic_page is handed a 'group' of pages from an allocator
and needs to convert that group of pages to a compound page. The ref
count of each page in this 'group' is one as set by the allocator.
However, the ref count of compound page tail pages must be zero.

The potential race comes about when ref counted pages are returned from
the allocator. When this happens, other mm code could also take a
reference on the page. __page_cache_add_speculative is one such example.
Therefore, prep_compound_gigantic_page can not just set the ref count of
pages to zero as it does today. Doing so would lose the reference taken
by any other code. This would lead to BUGs in code checking ref counts
and could possibly even lead to memory corruption.

There are two possible ways to address this issue.

1) Make all allocators of gigantic groups of pages be able to return a
properly constructed compound page.

2) Make prep_compound_gigantic_page be more careful when constructing a
compound page.

This patch takes approach 2.

In prep_compound_gigantic_page, use cmpxchg to only set ref count to zero
if it is one. If the cmpxchg fails, call synchronize_rcu() in the hope
that the extra ref count will be driopped during a rcu grace period. This
is not a performance critical code path and the wait should be
accceptable. If the ref count is still inflated after the grace period,
then undo any modifications made and return an error.

Currently prep_compound_gigantic_page is type void and does not return
errors. Modify the two callers to check for and handle error returns. On
error, the caller must free the 'group' of pages as they can not be used
to form a gigantic page. After freeing pages, the runtime caller
(alloc_fresh_huge_page) will retry the allocation once. Boot time
allocations can not be retried.

The routine prep_compound_page also unconditionally sets the ref count of
compound page tail pages to zero. However, in this case the buddy
allocator is constructing a compound page from freshly allocated pages.
The ref count on those freshly allocated pages is already zero, so the
set_page_count(p, 0) is unnecessary and could lead to confusion. Just
remove it.

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-mm/CAG48ez23q0Jy9cuVnwAe7t_fdhMk2S7N5Hdi-GLcCeq5bsfLxw@mail.gmail.com/

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210622021423.154662-3-mike.kravetz@oracle.com
Fixes: 58a84aa92723 ("thp: set compound tail page _count to zero")
Signed-off-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Reported-by: Jann Horn <jannh@google.com>
Cc: Youquan Song <youquan.song@intel.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: "Kirill A . Shutemov" <kirill@shutemov.name>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

48b8d744 30-Jun-2021 Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>

hugetlb: remove prep_compound_huge_page cleanup

Patch series "Fix prep_compound_gigantic_page ref count adjustment".

These patches address the possible race between
prep_compound_gigantic_page and __page_cache_add_speculative as described
by Jann Horn in [1].

The first patch simply removes the unnecessary/obsolete helper routine
prep_compound_huge_page to make the actual fix a little simpler.

The second patch is the actual fix and has a detailed explanation in the
commit message.

This potential issue has existed for almost 10 years and I am unaware of
anyone actually hitting the race. I did not cc stable, but would be happy
to squash the patches and send to stable if anyone thinks that is a good
idea.

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-mm/CAG48ez23q0Jy9cuVnwAe7t_fdhMk2S7N5Hdi-GLcCeq5bsfLxw@mail.gmail.com/

This patch (of 2):

I could not think of a reliable way to recreate the issue for testing.
Rather, I 'simulated errors' to exercise all the error paths.

The routine prep_compound_huge_page is a simple wrapper to call either
prep_compound_gigantic_page or prep_compound_page. However, it is only
called from gather_bootmem_prealloc which only processes gigantic pages.
Eliminate the routine and call prep_compound_gigantic_page directly.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210622021423.154662-1-mike.kravetz@oracle.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210622021423.154662-2-mike.kravetz@oracle.com
Signed-off-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Andrea Arcangeli <aarcange@redhat.com>
Cc: Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz>
Cc: Jann Horn <jannh@google.com>
Cc: John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com>
Cc: "Kirill A . Shutemov" <kirill@shutemov.name>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Youquan Song <youquan.song@intel.com>
Cc: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

e6d41f12 30-Jun-2021 Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>

mm: hugetlb: introduce CONFIG_HUGETLB_PAGE_FREE_VMEMMAP_DEFAULT_ON

When using HUGETLB_PAGE_FREE_VMEMMAP, the freeing unused vmemmap pages
associated with each HugeTLB page is default off. Now the vmemmap is PMD
mapped. So there is no side effect when this feature is enabled with no
HugeTLB pages in the system. Someone may want to enable this feature in
the compiler time instead of using boot command line. So add a config to
make it default on when someone do not want to enable it via command line.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210616094915.34432-4-songmuchun@bytedance.com
Signed-off-by: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Cc: Chen Huang <chenhuang5@huawei.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Xiongchun Duan <duanxiongchun@bytedance.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

2d7a2171 30-Jun-2021 Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>

mm: sparsemem: use huge PMD mapping for vmemmap pages

The preparation of splitting huge PMD mapping of vmemmap pages is ready,
so switch the mapping from PTE to PMD.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210616094915.34432-3-songmuchun@bytedance.com
Signed-off-by: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Reviewed-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Chen Huang <chenhuang5@huawei.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Xiongchun Duan <duanxiongchun@bytedance.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

3bc2b6a7 30-Jun-2021 Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>

mm: sparsemem: split the huge PMD mapping of vmemmap pages

Patch series "Split huge PMD mapping of vmemmap pages", v4.

In order to reduce the difficulty of code review in series[1]. We disable
huge PMD mapping of vmemmap pages when that feature is enabled. In this
series, we do not disable huge PMD mapping of vmemmap pages anymore. We
will split huge PMD mapping when needed. When HugeTLB pages are freed
from the pool we do not attempt coalasce and move back to a PMD mapping
because it is much more complex.

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-doc/20210510030027.56044-1-songmuchun@bytedance.com/

This patch (of 3):

In [1], PMD mappings of vmemmap pages were disabled if the the feature
hugetlb_free_vmemmap was enabled. This was done to simplify the initial
implementation of vmmemap freeing for hugetlb pages. Now, remove this
simplification by allowing PMD mapping and switching to PTE mappings as
needed for allocated hugetlb pages.

When a hugetlb page is allocated, the vmemmap page tables are walked to
free vmemmap pages. During this walk, split huge PMD mappings to PTE
mappings as required. In the unlikely case PTE pages can not be
allocated, return error(ENOMEM) and do not optimize vmemmap of the hugetlb
page.

When HugeTLB pages are freed from the pool, we do not attempt to
coalesce and move back to a PMD mapping because it is much more complex.

[1] https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210510030027.56044-8-songmuchun@bytedance.com

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210616094915.34432-1-songmuchun@bytedance.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210616094915.34432-2-songmuchun@bytedance.com
Signed-off-by: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Reviewed-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Chen Huang <chenhuang5@huawei.com>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Xiongchun Duan <duanxiongchun@bytedance.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

8cc5fcbb 30-Jun-2021 Mina Almasry <almasrymina@google.com>

mm, hugetlb: fix racy resv_huge_pages underflow on UFFDIO_COPY

On UFFDIO_COPY, if we fail to copy the page contents while holding the
hugetlb_fault_mutex, we will drop the mutex and return to the caller after
allocating a page that consumed a reservation. In this case there may be
a fault that double consumes the reservation. To handle this, we free the
allocated page, fix the reservations, and allocate a temporary hugetlb
page and return that to the caller. When the caller does the copy outside
of the lock, we again check the cache, and allocate a page consuming the
reservation, and copy over the contents.

Test:
Hacked the code locally such that resv_huge_pages underflows produce
a warning and the copy_huge_page_from_user() always fails, then:

./tools/testing/selftests/vm/userfaultfd hugetlb_shared 10
2 /tmp/kokonut_test/huge/userfaultfd_test && echo test success
./tools/testing/selftests/vm/userfaultfd hugetlb 10
2 /tmp/kokonut_test/huge/userfaultfd_test && echo test success

Both tests succeed and produce no warnings. After the
test runs number of free/resv hugepages is correct.

[yuehaibing@huawei.com: remove set but not used variable 'vm_alloc_shared']
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210601141610.28332-1-yuehaibing@huawei.com
[almasrymina@google.com: fix allocation error check and copy func name]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210605010626.1459873-1-almasrymina@google.com

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210528005029.88088-1-almasrymina@google.com
Signed-off-by: Mina Almasry <almasrymina@google.com>
Signed-off-by: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Cc: Axel Rasmussen <axelrasmussen@google.com>
Cc: Peter Xu <peterx@redhat.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

3382bbee 30-Jun-2021 Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu>

mm/vmalloc: enable mapping of huge pages at pte level in vmalloc

On some architectures like powerpc, there are huge pages that are mapped
at pte level.

Enable it in vmalloc.

For that, architectures can provide arch_vmap_pte_supported_shift() that
returns the shift for pages to map at pte level.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/2c717e3b1fba1894d890feb7669f83025bfa314d.1620795204.git.christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu
Signed-off-by: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Uladzislau Rezki <uladzislau.rezki@sony.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

f7ee1f13 30-Jun-2021 Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu>

mm/vmalloc: enable mapping of huge pages at pte level in vmap

On some architectures like powerpc, there are huge pages that are mapped
at pte level.

Enable it in vmap.

For that, architectures can provide arch_vmap_pte_range_map_size() that
returns the size of pages to map at pte level.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/fb3ccc73377832ac6708181ec419128a2f98ce36.1620795204.git.christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu
Signed-off-by: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Uladzislau Rezki <uladzislau.rezki@sony.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

79c1c594 30-Jun-2021 Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu>

mm/hugetlb: change parameters of arch_make_huge_pte()

Patch series "Subject: [PATCH v2 0/5] Implement huge VMAP and VMALLOC on powerpc 8xx", v2.

This series implements huge VMAP and VMALLOC on powerpc 8xx.

Powerpc 8xx has 4 page sizes:
- 4k
- 16k
- 512k
- 8M

At the time being, vmalloc and vmap only support huge pages which are
leaf at PMD level.

Here the PMD level is 4M, it doesn't correspond to any supported
page size.

For now, implement use of 16k and 512k pages which is done
at PTE level.

Support of 8M pages will be implemented later, it requires use of
hugepd tables.

To allow this, the architecture provides two functions:
- arch_vmap_pte_range_map_size() which tells vmap_pte_range() what
page size to use. A stub returning PAGE_SIZE is provided when the
architecture doesn't provide this function.
- arch_vmap_pte_supported_shift() which tells __vmalloc_node_range()
what page shift to use for a given area size. A stub returning
PAGE_SHIFT is provided when the architecture doesn't provide this
function.

This patch (of 5):

At the time being, arch_make_huge_pte() has the following prototype:

pte_t arch_make_huge_pte(pte_t entry, struct vm_area_struct *vma,
struct page *page, int writable);

vma is used to get the pages shift or size.
vma is also used on Sparc to get vm_flags.
page is not used.
writable is not used.

In order to use this function without a vma, replace vma by shift and
flags. Also remove the used parameters.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/cover.1620795204.git.christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/f4633ac6a7da2f22f31a04a89e0a7026bb78b15b.1620795204.git.christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu
Signed-off-by: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu>
Acked-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>
Cc: Michael Ellerman <mpe@ellerman.id.au>
Cc: Benjamin Herrenschmidt <benh@kernel.crashing.org>
Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Cc: Uladzislau Rezki <uladzislau.rezki@sony.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

babbbdd0 30-Jun-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/huge_memory.c: don't discard hugepage if other processes are mapping it

If other processes are mapping any other subpages of the hugepage, i.e.
in pte-mapped thp case, page_mapcount() will return 1 incorrectly. Then
we would discard the page while other processes are still mapping it. Fix
it by using total_mapcount() which can tell whether other processes are
still mapping it.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210511134857.1581273-6-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Fixes: b8d3c4c3009d ("mm/huge_memory.c: don't split THP page when MADV_FREE syscall is called")
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: "Aneesh Kumar K . V" <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Song Liu <songliubraving@fb.com>
Cc: William Kucharski <william.kucharski@oracle.com>
Cc: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

9132a468 30-Jun-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/huge_memory.c: remove unnecessary tlb_remove_page_size() for huge zero pmd

Commit aa88b68c3b1d ("thp: keep huge zero page pinned until tlb flush")
introduced tlb_remove_page() for huge zero page to keep it pinned until
flush is complete and prevents the page from being split under us. But
huge zero page is kept pinned until all relevant mm_users reach zero since
the commit 6fcb52a56ff6 ("thp: reduce usage of huge zero page's atomic
counter"). So tlb_remove_page_size() for huge zero pmd is unnecessary
now.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210511134857.1581273-5-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Acked-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: "Aneesh Kumar K . V" <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Song Liu <songliubraving@fb.com>
Cc: William Kucharski <william.kucharski@oracle.com>
Cc: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

e6be37b2 30-Jun-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/huge_memory.c: add missing read-only THP checking in transparent_hugepage_enabled()

Since commit 99cb0dbd47a1 ("mm,thp: add read-only THP support for
(non-shmem) FS"), read-only THP file mapping is supported. But it forgot
to add checking for it in transparent_hugepage_enabled(). To fix it, we
add checking for read-only THP file mapping and also introduce helper
transhuge_vma_enabled() to check whether thp is enabled for specified vma
to reduce duplicated code. We rename transparent_hugepage_enabled to
transparent_hugepage_active to make the code easier to follow as suggested
by David Hildenbrand.

[linmiaohe@huawei.com: define transhuge_vma_enabled next to transhuge_vma_suitable]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210514093007.4117906-1-linmiaohe@huawei.com

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210511134857.1581273-4-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Fixes: 99cb0dbd47a1 ("mm,thp: add read-only THP support for (non-shmem) FS")
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: "Aneesh Kumar K . V" <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Song Liu <songliubraving@fb.com>
Cc: William Kucharski <william.kucharski@oracle.com>
Cc: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

dfe5c51c 30-Jun-2021 Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>

mm/huge_memory.c: use page->deferred_list

Now that we can represent the location of ->deferred_list instead of
->mapping + ->index, make use of it to improve readability.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210511134857.1581273-3-linmiaohe@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: Yang Shi <shy828301@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com>
Cc: "Aneesh Kumar K . V" <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Cc: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
Cc: Johannes Weiner <hannes@cmpxchg.org>
Cc: Kirill A. Shutemov <kirill.shutemov@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Cc: Ralph Campbell <rcampbell@nvidia.com>
Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
Cc: Song Liu <songliubraving@fb.com>
Cc: William Kucharski <william.kucharski@oracle.com>
Cc: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

b593b90d 30-Jun-2021 Shixin Liu <liushixin2@huawei.com>

mm/debug_vm_pgtable: remove redundant pfn_{pmd/pte}() and fix one comment mistake

Remove redundant pfn_{pmd/pte}() in {pmd/pte}_advanced_tests() and adjust
pfn_pud() in pud_advanced_tests() to make it similar with other two
functions.

In addition, the branch condition should be CONFIG_TRANSPARENT_HUGEPAGE
instead of CONFIG_ARCH_HAS_PTE_DEVMAP.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210419071820.750217-2-liushixin2@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Shixin Liu <liushixin2@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

5fe77be6 30-Jun-2021 Shixin Liu <liushixin2@huawei.com>

mm/debug_vm_pgtable: move {pmd/pud}_huge_tests out of CONFIG_TRANSPARENT_HUGEPAGE

The functions {pmd/pud}_set_huge and {pmd/pud}_clear_huge are not
dependent on THP. Hence move {pmd/pud}_huge_tests out of
CONFIG_TRANSPARENT_HUGEPAGE.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210419071820.750217-1-liushixin2@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: Shixin Liu <liushixin2@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

77490587 30-Jun-2021 Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>

mm: hugetlb: introduce nr_free_vmemmap_pages in the struct hstate

All the infrastructure is ready, so we introduce nr_free_vmemmap_pages
field in the hstate to indicate how many vmemmap pages associated with a
HugeTLB page that can be freed to buddy allocator. And initialize it in
the hugetlb_vmemmap_init(). This patch is actual enablement of the
feature.

There are only (RESERVE_VMEMMAP_SIZE / sizeof(struct page)) struct page
structs that can be used when CONFIG_HUGETLB_PAGE_FREE_VMEMMAP, so add a
BUILD_BUG_ON to catch invalid usage of the tail struct page.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210510030027.56044-10-songmuchun@bytedance.com
Signed-off-by: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Acked-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Reviewed-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Tested-by: Chen Huang <chenhuang5@huawei.com>
Tested-by: Bodeddula Balasubramaniam <bodeddub@amazon.com>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Andy Lutomirski <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Cc: Balbir Singh <bsingharora@gmail.com>
Cc: Barry Song <song.bao.hua@hisilicon.com>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: HORIGUCHI NAOYA <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>
Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Joao Martins <joao.m.martins@oracle.com>
Cc: Joerg Roedel <jroedel@suse.de>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Mina Almasry <almasrymina@google.com>
Cc: Oliver Neukum <oneukum@suse.com>
Cc: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@kernel.org>
Cc: Pawan Gupta <pawan.kumar.gupta@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Xiongchun Duan <duanxiongchun@bytedance.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

4bab4964 30-Jun-2021 Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>

mm: memory_hotplug: disable memmap_on_memory when hugetlb_free_vmemmap enabled

The parameter of memory_hotplug.memmap_on_memory is not compatible with
hugetlb_free_vmemmap. So disable it when hugetlb_free_vmemmap is enabled.

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: remove unneeded include, per Oscar]

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210510030027.56044-9-songmuchun@bytedance.com
Signed-off-by: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Acked-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Andy Lutomirski <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Cc: Balbir Singh <bsingharora@gmail.com>
Cc: Barry Song <song.bao.hua@hisilicon.com>
Cc: Bodeddula Balasubramaniam <bodeddub@amazon.com>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Chen Huang <chenhuang5@huawei.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: HORIGUCHI NAOYA <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>
Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Joao Martins <joao.m.martins@oracle.com>
Cc: Joerg Roedel <jroedel@suse.de>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Mina Almasry <almasrymina@google.com>
Cc: Oliver Neukum <oneukum@suse.com>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@kernel.org>
Cc: Pawan Gupta <pawan.kumar.gupta@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Xiongchun Duan <duanxiongchun@bytedance.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

e9fdff87 30-Jun-2021 Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>

mm: hugetlb: add a kernel parameter hugetlb_free_vmemmap

Add a kernel parameter hugetlb_free_vmemmap to enable the feature of
freeing unused vmemmap pages associated with each hugetlb page on boot.

We disable PMD mapping of vmemmap pages for x86-64 arch when this feature
is enabled. Because vmemmap_remap_free() depends on vmemmap being base
page mapped.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210510030027.56044-8-songmuchun@bytedance.com
Signed-off-by: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Reviewed-by: Barry Song <song.bao.hua@hisilicon.com>
Reviewed-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Tested-by: Chen Huang <chenhuang5@huawei.com>
Tested-by: Bodeddula Balasubramaniam <bodeddub@amazon.com>
Reviewed-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Andy Lutomirski <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Cc: Balbir Singh <bsingharora@gmail.com>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: HORIGUCHI NAOYA <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>
Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Joao Martins <joao.m.martins@oracle.com>
Cc: Joerg Roedel <jroedel@suse.de>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Mina Almasry <almasrymina@google.com>
Cc: Oliver Neukum <oneukum@suse.com>
Cc: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@kernel.org>
Cc: Pawan Gupta <pawan.kumar.gupta@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Xiongchun Duan <duanxiongchun@bytedance.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

ad2fa371 30-Jun-2021 Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>

mm: hugetlb: alloc the vmemmap pages associated with each HugeTLB page

When we free a HugeTLB page to the buddy allocator, we need to allocate
the vmemmap pages associated with it. However, we may not be able to
allocate the vmemmap pages when the system is under memory pressure. In
this case, we just refuse to free the HugeTLB page. This changes behavior
in some corner cases as listed below:

1) Failing to free a huge page triggered by the user (decrease nr_pages).

User needs to try again later.

2) Failing to free a surplus huge page when freed by the application.

Try again later when freeing a huge page next time.

3) Failing to dissolve a free huge page on ZONE_MOVABLE via
offline_pages().

This can happen when we have plenty of ZONE_MOVABLE memory, but
not enough kernel memory to allocate vmemmmap pages. We may even
be able to migrate huge page contents, but will not be able to
dissolve the source huge page. This will prevent an offline
operation and is unfortunate as memory offlining is expected to
succeed on movable zones. Users that depend on memory hotplug
to succeed for movable zones should carefully consider whether the
memory savings gained from this feature are worth the risk of
possibly not being able to offline memory in certain situations.

4) Failing to dissolve a huge page on CMA/ZONE_MOVABLE via
alloc_contig_range() - once we have that handling in place. Mainly
affects CMA and virtio-mem.

Similar to 3). virito-mem will handle migration errors gracefully.
CMA might be able to fallback on other free areas within the CMA
region.

Vmemmap pages are allocated from the page freeing context. In order for
those allocations to be not disruptive (e.g. trigger oom killer)
__GFP_NORETRY is used. hugetlb_lock is dropped for the allocation because
a non sleeping allocation would be too fragile and it could fail too
easily under memory pressure. GFP_ATOMIC or other modes to access memory
reserves is not used because we want to prevent consuming reserves under
heavy hugetlb freeing.

[mike.kravetz@oracle.com: fix dissolve_free_huge_page use of tail/head page]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210527231225.226987-1-mike.kravetz@oracle.com
[willy@infradead.org: fix alloc_vmemmap_page_list documentation warning]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210615200242.1716568-6-willy@infradead.org

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210510030027.56044-7-songmuchun@bytedance.com
Signed-off-by: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Signed-off-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Signed-off-by: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Reviewed-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Andy Lutomirski <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Cc: Balbir Singh <bsingharora@gmail.com>
Cc: Barry Song <song.bao.hua@hisilicon.com>
Cc: Bodeddula Balasubramaniam <bodeddub@amazon.com>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Chen Huang <chenhuang5@huawei.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: HORIGUCHI NAOYA <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>
Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Joao Martins <joao.m.martins@oracle.com>
Cc: Joerg Roedel <jroedel@suse.de>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Mina Almasry <almasrymina@google.com>
Cc: Oliver Neukum <oneukum@suse.com>
Cc: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@kernel.org>
Cc: Pawan Gupta <pawan.kumar.gupta@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Xiongchun Duan <duanxiongchun@bytedance.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

b65d4adb 30-Jun-2021 Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>

mm: hugetlb: defer freeing of HugeTLB pages

In the subsequent patch, we should allocate the vmemmap pages when freeing
a HugeTLB page. But update_and_free_page() can be called under any
context, so we cannot use GFP_KERNEL to allocate vmemmap pages. However,
we can defer the actual freeing in a kworker to prevent from using
GFP_ATOMIC to allocate the vmemmap pages.

The __update_and_free_page() is where the call to allocate vmemmmap pages
will be inserted.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210510030027.56044-6-songmuchun@bytedance.com
Signed-off-by: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Reviewed-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Andy Lutomirski <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Cc: Balbir Singh <bsingharora@gmail.com>
Cc: Barry Song <song.bao.hua@hisilicon.com>
Cc: Bodeddula Balasubramaniam <bodeddub@amazon.com>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Chen Huang <chenhuang5@huawei.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: HORIGUCHI NAOYA <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>
Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Joao Martins <joao.m.martins@oracle.com>
Cc: Joerg Roedel <jroedel@suse.de>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Mina Almasry <almasrymina@google.com>
Cc: Oliver Neukum <oneukum@suse.com>
Cc: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@kernel.org>
Cc: Pawan Gupta <pawan.kumar.gupta@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Xiongchun Duan <duanxiongchun@bytedance.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

f41f2ed4 30-Jun-2021 Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>

mm: hugetlb: free the vmemmap pages associated with each HugeTLB page

Every HugeTLB has more than one struct page structure. We __know__ that
we only use the first 4 (__NR_USED_SUBPAGE) struct page structures to
store metadata associated with each HugeTLB.

There are a lot of struct page structures associated with each HugeTLB
page. For tail pages, the value of compound_head is the same. So we can
reuse first page of tail page structures. We map the virtual addresses of
the remaining pages of tail page structures to the first tail page struct,
and then free these page frames. Therefore, we need to reserve two pages
as vmemmap areas.

When we allocate a HugeTLB page from the buddy, we can free some vmemmap
pages associated with each HugeTLB page. It is more appropriate to do it
in the prep_new_huge_page().

The free_vmemmap_pages_per_hpage(), which indicates how many vmemmap pages
associated with a HugeTLB page can be freed, returns zero for now, which
means the feature is disabled. We will enable it once all the
infrastructure is there.

[willy@infradead.org: fix documentation warning]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210615200242.1716568-5-willy@infradead.org

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210510030027.56044-5-songmuchun@bytedance.com
Signed-off-by: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Signed-off-by: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Tested-by: Chen Huang <chenhuang5@huawei.com>
Tested-by: Bodeddula Balasubramaniam <bodeddub@amazon.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Reviewed-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Andy Lutomirski <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Cc: Balbir Singh <bsingharora@gmail.com>
Cc: Barry Song <song.bao.hua@hisilicon.com>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: HORIGUCHI NAOYA <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>
Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Joao Martins <joao.m.martins@oracle.com>
Cc: Joerg Roedel <jroedel@suse.de>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Cc: Mina Almasry <almasrymina@google.com>
Cc: Oliver Neukum <oneukum@suse.com>
Cc: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@kernel.org>
Cc: Pawan Gupta <pawan.kumar.gupta@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Xiongchun Duan <duanxiongchun@bytedance.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

426e5c42 30-Jun-2021 Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>

mm: memory_hotplug: factor out bootmem core functions to bootmem_info.c

Patch series "Free some vmemmap pages of HugeTLB page", v23.

This patch series will free some vmemmap pages(struct page structures)
associated with each HugeTLB page when preallocated to save memory.

In order to reduce the difficulty of the first version of code review. In
this version, we disable PMD/huge page mapping of vmemmap if this feature
was enabled. This acutely eliminates a bunch of the complex code doing
page table manipulation. When this patch series is solid, we cam add the
code of vmemmap page table manipulation in the future.

The struct page structures (page structs) are used to describe a physical
page frame. By default, there is an one-to-one mapping from a page frame
to it's corresponding page struct.

The HugeTLB pages consist of multiple base page size pages and is
supported by many architectures. See hugetlbpage.rst in the Documentation
directory for more details. On the x86 architecture, HugeTLB pages of
size 2MB and 1GB are currently supported. Since the base page size on x86
is 4KB, a 2MB HugeTLB page consists of 512 base pages and a 1GB HugeTLB
page consists of 4096 base pages. For each base page, there is a
corresponding page struct.

Within the HugeTLB subsystem, only the first 4 page structs are used to
contain unique information about a HugeTLB page. HUGETLB_CGROUP_MIN_ORDER
provides this upper limit. The only 'useful' information in the remaining
page structs is the compound_head field, and this field is the same for
all tail pages.

By removing redundant page structs for HugeTLB pages, memory can returned
to the buddy allocator for other uses.

When the system boot up, every 2M HugeTLB has 512 struct page structs which
size is 8 pages(sizeof(struct page) * 512 / PAGE_SIZE).

HugeTLB struct pages(8 pages) page frame(8 pages)
+-----------+ ---virt_to_page---> +-----------+ mapping to +-----------+
| | | 0 | -------------> | 0 |
| | +-----------+ +-----------+
| | | 1 | -------------> | 1 |
| | +-----------+ +-----------+
| | | 2 | -------------> | 2 |
| | +-----------+ +-----------+
| | | 3 | -------------> | 3 |
| | +-----------+ +-----------+
| | | 4 | -------------> | 4 |
| 2MB | +-----------+ +-----------+
| | | 5 | -------------> | 5 |
| | +-----------+ +-----------+
| | | 6 | -------------> | 6 |
| | +-----------+ +-----------+
| | | 7 | -------------> | 7 |
| | +-----------+ +-----------+
| |
| |
| |
+-----------+

The value of page->compound_head is the same for all tail pages. The
first page of page structs (page 0) associated with the HugeTLB page
contains the 4 page structs necessary to describe the HugeTLB. The only
use of the remaining pages of page structs (page 1 to page 7) is to point
to page->compound_head. Therefore, we can remap pages 2 to 7 to page 1.
Only 2 pages of page structs will be used for each HugeTLB page. This
will allow us to free the remaining 6 pages to the buddy allocator.

Here is how things look after remapping.

HugeTLB struct pages(8 pages) page frame(8 pages)
+-----------+ ---virt_to_page---> +-----------+ mapping to +-----------+
| | | 0 | -------------> | 0 |
| | +-----------+ +-----------+
| | | 1 | -------------> | 1 |
| | +-----------+ +-----------+
| | | 2 | ----------------^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^
| | +-----------+ | | | | |
| | | 3 | ------------------+ | | | |
| | +-----------+ | | | |
| | | 4 | --------------------+ | | |
| 2MB | +-----------+ | | |
| | | 5 | ----------------------+ | |
| | +-----------+ | |
| | | 6 | ------------------------+ |
| | +-----------+ |
| | | 7 | --------------------------+
| | +-----------+
| |
| |
| |
+-----------+

When a HugeTLB is freed to the buddy system, we should allocate 6 pages
for vmemmap pages and restore the previous mapping relationship.

Apart from 2MB HugeTLB page, we also have 1GB HugeTLB page. It is similar
to the 2MB HugeTLB page. We also can use this approach to free the
vmemmap pages.

In this case, for the 1GB HugeTLB page, we can save 4094 pages. This is a
very substantial gain. On our server, run some SPDK/QEMU applications
which will use 1024GB HugeTLB page. With this feature enabled, we can
save ~16GB (1G hugepage)/~12GB (2MB hugepage) memory.

Because there are vmemmap page tables reconstruction on the
freeing/allocating path, it increases some overhead. Here are some
overhead analysis.

1) Allocating 10240 2MB HugeTLB pages.

a) With this patch series applied:
# time echo 10240 > /proc/sys/vm/nr_hugepages

real 0m0.166s
user 0m0.000s
sys 0m0.166s

# bpftrace -e 'kprobe:alloc_fresh_huge_page { @start[tid] = nsecs; }
kretprobe:alloc_fresh_huge_page /@start[tid]/ { @latency = hist(nsecs -
@start[tid]); delete(@start[tid]); }'
Attaching 2 probes...

@latency:
[8K, 16K) 5476 |@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@|
[16K, 32K) 4760 |@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ |
[32K, 64K) 4 | |

b) Without this patch series:
# time echo 10240 > /proc/sys/vm/nr_hugepages

real 0m0.067s
user 0m0.000s
sys 0m0.067s

# bpftrace -e 'kprobe:alloc_fresh_huge_page { @start[tid] = nsecs; }
kretprobe:alloc_fresh_huge_page /@start[tid]/ { @latency = hist(nsecs -
@start[tid]); delete(@start[tid]); }'
Attaching 2 probes...

@latency:
[4K, 8K) 10147 |@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@|
[8K, 16K) 93 | |

Summarize: this feature is about ~2x slower than before.

2) Freeing 10240 2MB HugeTLB pages.

a) With this patch series applied:
# time echo 0 > /proc/sys/vm/nr_hugepages

real 0m0.213s
user 0m0.000s
sys 0m0.213s

# bpftrace -e 'kprobe:free_pool_huge_page { @start[tid] = nsecs; }
kretprobe:free_pool_huge_page /@start[tid]/ { @latency = hist(nsecs -
@start[tid]); delete(@start[tid]); }'
Attaching 2 probes...

@latency:
[8K, 16K) 6 | |
[16K, 32K) 10227 |@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@|
[32K, 64K) 7 | |

b) Without this patch series:
# time echo 0 > /proc/sys/vm/nr_hugepages

real 0m0.081s
user 0m0.000s
sys 0m0.081s

# bpftrace -e 'kprobe:free_pool_huge_page { @start[tid] = nsecs; }
kretprobe:free_pool_huge_page /@start[tid]/ { @latency = hist(nsecs -
@start[tid]); delete(@start[tid]); }'
Attaching 2 probes...

@latency:
[4K, 8K) 6805 |@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@|
[8K, 16K) 3427 |@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ |
[16K, 32K) 8 | |

Summary: The overhead of __free_hugepage is about ~2-3x slower than before.

Although the overhead has increased, the overhead is not significant.
Like Mike said, "However, remember that the majority of use cases create
HugeTLB pages at or shortly after boot time and add them to the pool. So,
additional overhead is at pool creation time. There is no change to
'normal run time' operations of getting a page from or returning a page to
the pool (think page fault/unmap)".

Despite the overhead and in addition to the memory gains from this series.
The following data is obtained by Joao Martins. Very thanks to his
effort.

There's an additional benefit which is page (un)pinners will see an improvement
and Joao presumes because there are fewer memmap pages and thus the tail/head
pages are staying in cache more often.

Out of the box Joao saw (when comparing linux-next against linux-next +
this series) with gup_test and pinning a 16G HugeTLB file (with 1G pages):

get_user_pages(): ~32k -> ~9k
unpin_user_pages(): ~75k -> ~70k

Usually any tight loop fetching compound_head(), or reading tail pages
data (e.g. compound_head) benefit a lot. There's some unpinning
inefficiencies Joao was fixing[2], but with that in added it shows even
more:

unpin_user_pages(): ~27k -> ~3.8k

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-mm/20210409205254.242291-1-mike.kravetz@oracle.com/
[2] https://lore.kernel.org/linux-mm/20210204202500.26474-1-joao.m.martins@oracle.com/

This patch (of 9):

Move bootmem info registration common API to individual bootmem_info.c.
And we will use {get,put}_page_bootmem() to initialize the page for the
vmemmap pages or free the vmemmap pages to buddy in the later patch. So
move them out of CONFIG_MEMORY_HOTPLUG_SPARSE. This is just code movement
without any functional change.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210510030027.56044-1-songmuchun@bytedance.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210510030027.56044-2-songmuchun@bytedance.com
Signed-off-by: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Acked-by: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Reviewed-by: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Miaohe Lin <linmiaohe@huawei.com>
Tested-by: Chen Huang <chenhuang5@huawei.com>
Tested-by: Bodeddula Balasubramaniam <bodeddub@amazon.com>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: x86@kernel.org
Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Andy Lutomirski <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Alexander Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
Cc: Paul E. McKenney <paulmck@kernel.org>
Cc: Pawan Gupta <pawan.kumar.gupta@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@infradead.org>
Cc: Oliver Neukum <oneukum@suse.com>
Cc: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Cc: Joerg Roedel <jroedel@suse.de>
Cc: Mina Almasry <almasrymina@google.com>
Cc: David Rientjes <rientjes@google.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Barry Song <song.bao.hua@hisilicon.com>
Cc: HORIGUCHI NAOYA <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>
Cc: Joao Martins <joao.m.martins@oracle.com>
Cc: Xiongchun Duan <duanxiongchun@bytedance.com>
Cc: Balbir Singh <bsingharora@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

df668a5f 30-Jun-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge tag 'for-5.14/block-2021-06-29' of git://git.kernel.dk/linux-block

Pull core block updates from Jens Axboe:

- disk events cleanup (Christoph)

- gendisk and request queue allocation simplifications (Christoph)

- bdev_disk_changed cleanups (Christoph)

- IO priority improvements (Bart)

- Chained bio completion trace fix (Edward)

- blk-wbt fixes (Jan)

- blk-wbt enable/disable fix (Zhang)

- Scheduler dispatch improvements (Jan, Ming)

- Shared tagset scheduler improvements (John)

- BFQ updates (Paolo, Luca, Pietro)

- BFQ lock inversion fix (Jan)

- Documentation improvements (Kir)

- CLONE_IO block cgroup fix (Tejun)

- Remove of ancient and deprecated block dump feature (zhangyi)

- Discard merge fix (Ming)

- Misc fixes or followup fixes (Colin, Damien, Dan, Long, Max, Thomas,
Yang)

* tag 'for-5.14/block-2021-06-29' of git://git.kernel.dk/linux-block: (129 commits)
block: fix discard request merge
block/mq-deadline: Remove a WARN_ON_ONCE() call
blk-mq: update hctx->dispatch_busy in case of real scheduler
blk: Fix lock inversion between ioc lock and bfqd lock
bfq: Remove merged request already in bfq_requests_merged()
block: pass a gendisk to bdev_disk_changed
block: move bdev_disk_changed
block: add the events* attributes to disk_attrs
block: move the disk events code to a separate file
block: fix trace completion for chained bio
block/partitions/msdos: Fix typo inidicator -> indicator
block, bfq: reset waker pointer with shared queues
block, bfq: check waker only for queues with no in-flight I/O
block, bfq: avoid delayed merge of async queues
block, bfq: boost throughput by extending queue-merging times
block, bfq: consider also creation time in delayed stable merge
block, bfq: fix delayed stable merge check
block, bfq: let also stably merged queues enjoy weight raising
blk-wbt: make sure throttle is enabled properly
blk-wbt: introduce a new disable state to prevent false positive by rwb_enabled()
...


023accf5 30-Jun-2021 Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>

memblock: ensure there is no overflow in memblock_overlaps_region()

There maybe an overflow in memblock_overlaps_region() if it is called with
base and size such that

base + size > PHYS_ADDR_MAX

Make sure that memblock_overlaps_region() caps the size to prevent such
overflow and remove now duplicated call to memblock_cap_size() from
memblock_is_region_reserved().

Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Tested-by: Tony Lindgren <tony@atomide.com>

f921f53e 17-May-2021 Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>

memblock: align freed memory map on pageblock boundaries with SPARSEMEM

When CONFIG_SPARSEMEM=y the ranges of the memory map that are freed are not
aligned to the pageblock boundaries which breaks assumptions about
homogeneity of the memory map throughout core mm code.

Make sure that the freed memory map is always aligned on pageblock
boundaries regardless of the memory model selection.

Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Tested-by: Tony Lindgren <tony@atomide.com>

e2a86800 17-May-2021 Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>

memblock: free_unused_memmap: use pageblock units instead of MAX_ORDER

The code that frees unused memory map uses rounds start and end of the
holes that are freed to MAX_ORDER_NR_PAGES to preserve continuity of the
memory map for MAX_ORDER regions.

Lots of core memory management functionality relies on homogeneity of the
memory map within each pageblock which size may differ from MAX_ORDER in
certain configurations.

Although currently, for the architectures that use free_unused_memmap(),
pageblock_order and MAX_ORDER are equivalent, it is cleaner to have common
notation thought mm code.

Replace MAX_ORDER_NR_PAGES with pageblock_nr_pages and update the comments
to make it more clear why the alignment to pageblock boundaries is
required.

Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Tested-by: Tony Lindgren <tony@atomide.com>

65090f30 29-Jun-2021 Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

Merge branch 'akpm' (patches from Andrew)

Merge misc updates from Andrew Morton:
"191 patches.

Subsystems affected by this patch series: kthread, ia64, scripts,
ntfs, squashfs, ocfs2, kernel/watchdog, and mm (gup, pagealloc, slab,
slub, kmemleak, dax, debug, pagecache, gup, swap, memcg, pagemap,
mprotect, bootmem, dma, tracing, vmalloc, kasan, initialization,
pagealloc, and memory-failure)"

* emailed patches from Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>: (191 commits)
mm,hwpoison: make get_hwpoison_page() call get_any_page()
mm,hwpoison: send SIGBUS with error virutal address
mm/page_alloc: split pcp->high across all online CPUs for cpuless nodes
mm/page_alloc: allow high-order pages to be stored on the per-cpu lists
mm: replace CONFIG_FLAT_NODE_MEM_MAP with CONFIG_FLATMEM
mm: replace CONFIG_NEED_MULTIPLE_NODES with CONFIG_NUMA
docs: remove description of DISCONTIGMEM
arch, mm: remove stale mentions of DISCONIGMEM
mm: remove CONFIG_DISCONTIGMEM
m68k: remove support for DISCONTIGMEM
arc: remove support for DISCONTIGMEM
arc: update comment about HIGHMEM implementation
alpha: remove DISCONTIGMEM and NUMA
mm/page_alloc: move free_the_page
mm/page_alloc: fix counting of managed_pages
mm/page_alloc: improve memmap_pages dbg msg
mm: drop SECTION_SHIFT in code comments
mm/page_alloc: introduce vm.percpu_pagelist_high_fraction
mm/page_alloc: limit the number of pages on PCP lists when reclaim is active
mm/page_alloc: scale the number of pages that are batch freed
...


0ed950d1 28-Jun-2021 Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>

mm,hwpoison: make get_hwpoison_page() call get_any_page()

__get_hwpoison_page() could fail to grab refcount by some race condition,
so it's helpful if we can handle it by retrying. We already have retry
logic, so make get_hwpoison_page() call get_any_page() when called from
memory_failure().

As a result, get_hwpoison_page() can return negative values (i.e. error
code), so some callers are also changed to handle error cases.
soft_offline_page() does nothing for -EBUSY because that's enough and
users in userspace can easily handle it. unpoison_memory() is also
unchanged because it's broken and need thorough fixes (will be done
later).

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210603233632.2964832-3-nao.horiguchi@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: Muchun Song <songmuchun@bytedance.com>
Cc: Mike Kravetz <mike.kravetz@oracle.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Tony Luck <tony.luck@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

a3f5d80e 28-Jun-2021 Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>

mm,hwpoison: send SIGBUS with error virutal address

Now an action required MCE in already hwpoisoned address surely sends a
SIGBUS to current process, but the SIGBUS doesn't convey error virtual
address. That's not optimal for hwpoison-aware applications.

To fix the issue, make memory_failure() call kill_accessing_process(),
that does pagetable walk to find the error virtual address. It could find
multiple virtual addresses for the same error page, and it seems hard to
tell which virtual address is correct one. But that's rare and sending
incorrect virtual address could be better than no address. So let's
report the first found virtual address for now.

[naoya.horiguchi@nec.com: fix walk_page_range() return]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210603051055.GA244241@hori.linux.bs1.fc.nec.co.jp

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210521030156.2612074-4-nao.horiguchi@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Naoya Horiguchi <naoya.horiguchi@nec.com>
Cc: Tony Luck <tony.luck@intel.com>
Cc: Aili Yao <yaoaili@kingsoft.com>
Cc: Oscar Salvador <osalvador@suse.de>
Cc: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@alien8.de>
Cc: Andy Lutomirski <luto@kernel.org>
Cc: Jue Wang <juew@google.com>
Cc: Borislav Petkov <bp@suse.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

203c06ee 28-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/page_alloc: split pcp->high across all online CPUs for cpuless nodes

Dave Hansen reported the following about Feng Tang's tests on a machine
with persistent memory onlined as a DRAM-like device.

Feng Tang tossed these on a "Cascade Lake" system with 96 threads and
~512G of persistent memory and 128G of DRAM. The PMEM is in "volatile
use" mode and being managed via the buddy just like the normal RAM.

The PMEM zones are big ones:

present 65011712 = 248 G
high 134595 = 525 M

The PMEM nodes, of course, don't have any CPUs in them.

With your series, the pcp->high value per-cpu is 69584 pages or about
270MB per CPU. Scaled up by the 96 CPU threads, that's ~26GB of
worst-case memory in the pcps per zone, or roughly 10% of the size of
the zone.

This should not cause a problem as such although it could trigger reclaim
due to pages being stored on per-cpu lists for CPUs remote to a node. It
is not possible to treat cpuless nodes exactly the same as normal nodes
but the worst-case scenario can be mitigated by splitting pcp->high across
all online CPUs for cpuless memory nodes.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210616110743.GK30378@techsingularity.net
Suggested-by: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@intel.com>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hdanton@sina.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: "Tang, Feng" <feng.tang@intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

44042b44 28-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/page_alloc: allow high-order pages to be stored on the per-cpu lists

The per-cpu page allocator (PCP) only stores order-0 pages. This means
that all THP and "cheap" high-order allocations including SLUB contends on
the zone->lock. This patch extends the PCP allocator to store THP and
"cheap" high-order pages. Note that struct per_cpu_pages increases in
size to 256 bytes (4 cache lines) on x86-64.

Note that this is not necessarily a universal performance win because of
how it is implemented. High-order pages can cause pcp->high to be
exceeded prematurely for lower-orders so for example, a large number of
THP pages being freed could release order-0 pages from the PCP lists.
Hence, much depends on the allocation/free pattern as observed by a single
CPU to determine if caching helps or hurts a particular workload.

That said, basic performance testing passed. The following is a netperf
UDP_STREAM test which hits the relevant patches as some of the network
allocations are high-order.

netperf-udp
5.13.0-rc2 5.13.0-rc2
mm-pcpburst-v3r4 mm-pcphighorder-v1r7
Hmean send-64 261.46 ( 0.00%) 266.30 * 1.85%*
Hmean send-128 516.35 ( 0.00%) 536.78 * 3.96%*
Hmean send-256 1014.13 ( 0.00%) 1034.63 * 2.02%*
Hmean send-1024 3907.65 ( 0.00%) 4046.11 * 3.54%*
Hmean send-2048 7492.93 ( 0.00%) 7754.85 * 3.50%*
Hmean send-3312 11410.04 ( 0.00%) 11772.32 * 3.18%*
Hmean send-4096 13521.95 ( 0.00%) 13912.34 * 2.89%*
Hmean send-8192 21660.50 ( 0.00%) 22730.72 * 4.94%*
Hmean send-16384 31902.32 ( 0.00%) 32637.50 * 2.30%*

Functionally, a patch like this is necessary to make bulk allocation of
high-order pages work with similar performance to order-0 bulk
allocations. The bulk allocator is not updated in this series as it would
have to be determined by bulk allocation users how they want to track the
order of pages allocated with the bulk allocator.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210611135753.GC30378@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Zi Yan <ziy@nvidia.com>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Jesper Dangaard Brouer <brouer@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

43b02ba9 28-Jun-2021 Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>

mm: replace CONFIG_FLAT_NODE_MEM_MAP with CONFIG_FLATMEM

After removal of the DISCONTIGMEM memory model the FLAT_NODE_MEM_MAP
configuration option is equivalent to FLATMEM.

Drop CONFIG_FLAT_NODE_MEM_MAP and use CONFIG_FLATMEM instead.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210608091316.3622-10-rppt@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Acked-by: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Acked-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org>
Cc: Ivan Kokshaysky <ink@jurassic.park.msu.ru>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Matt Turner <mattst88@gmail.com>
Cc: Richard Henderson <rth@twiddle.net>
Cc: Vineet Gupta <vgupta@synopsys.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

a9ee6cf5 28-Jun-2021 Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>

mm: replace CONFIG_NEED_MULTIPLE_NODES with CONFIG_NUMA

After removal of DISCINTIGMEM the NEED_MULTIPLE_NODES and NUMA
configuration options are equivalent.

Drop CONFIG_NEED_MULTIPLE_NODES and use CONFIG_NUMA instead.

Done with

$ sed -i 's/CONFIG_NEED_MULTIPLE_NODES/CONFIG_NUMA/' \
$(git grep -wl CONFIG_NEED_MULTIPLE_NODES)
$ sed -i 's/NEED_MULTIPLE_NODES/NUMA/' \
$(git grep -wl NEED_MULTIPLE_NODES)

with manual tweaks afterwards.

[rppt@linux.ibm.com: fix arm boot crash]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/YMj9vHhHOiCVN4BF@linux.ibm.com

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210608091316.3622-9-rppt@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Acked-by: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Acked-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org>
Cc: Ivan Kokshaysky <ink@jurassic.park.msu.ru>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Matt Turner <mattst88@gmail.com>
Cc: Richard Henderson <rth@twiddle.net>
Cc: Vineet Gupta <vgupta@synopsys.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

bb1c50d3 28-Jun-2021 Mike Rapoport <rppt@kernel.org>

mm: remove CONFIG_DISCONTIGMEM

There are no architectures that support DISCONTIGMEM left.

Remove the configuration option and the dead code it was guarding in the
generic memory management code.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210608091316.3622-6-rppt@kernel.org
Signed-off-by: Mike Rapoport <rppt@linux.ibm.com>
Acked-by: Arnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
Acked-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org>
Cc: Ivan Kokshaysky <ink@jurassic.park.msu.ru>
Cc: Jonathan Corbet <corbet@lwn.net>
Cc: Matt Turner <mattst88@gmail.com>
Cc: Richard Henderson <rth@twiddle.net>
Cc: Vineet Gupta <vgupta@synopsys.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

21d02f8f 28-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/page_alloc: move free_the_page

Patch series "Allow high order pages to be stored on PCP", v2.

The per-cpu page allocator (PCP) only handles order-0 pages. With the
series "Use local_lock for pcp protection and reduce stat overhead" and
"Calculate pcp->high based on zone sizes and active CPUs", it's now
feasible to store high-order pages on PCP lists.

This small series allows PCP to store "cheap" orders where cheap is
determined by PAGE_ALLOC_COSTLY_ORDER and THP-sized allocations.

This patch (of 2):

In the next page, free_compount_page is going to use the common helper
free_the_page. This patch moves the definition to ease review. No
functional change.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210603142220.10851-1-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210603142220.10851-2-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Jesper Dangaard Brouer <brouer@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

f7ec1044 28-Jun-2021 Liu Shixin <liushixin2@huawei.com>

mm/page_alloc: fix counting of managed_pages

commit f63661566fad ("mm/page_alloc.c: clear out zone->lowmem_reserve[] if
the zone is empty") clears out zone->lowmem_reserve[] if zone is empty.
But when zone is not empty and sysctl_lowmem_reserve_ratio[i] is set to
zero, zone_managed_pages(zone) is not counted in the managed_pages either.
This is inconsistent with the description of lowmem_reserve, so fix it.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210527125707.3760259-1-liushixin2@huawei.com
Fixes: f63661566fad ("mm/page_alloc.c: clear out zone->lowmem_reserve[] if the zone is empty")
Signed-off-by: Liu Shixin <liushixin2@huawei.com>
Reported-by: yangerkun <yangerkun@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: Baoquan He <bhe@redhat.com>
Acked-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

e47aa905 28-Jun-2021 Dong Aisheng <aisheng.dong@nxp.com>

mm/page_alloc: improve memmap_pages dbg msg

Make debug message more accurate.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210531091908.1738465-6-aisheng.dong@nxp.com
Signed-off-by: Dong Aisheng <aisheng.dong@nxp.com>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

74f44822 28-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/page_alloc: introduce vm.percpu_pagelist_high_fraction

This introduces a new sysctl vm.percpu_pagelist_high_fraction. It is
similar to the old vm.percpu_pagelist_fraction. The old sysctl increased
both pcp->batch and pcp->high with the higher pcp->high potentially
reducing zone->lock contention. However, the higher pcp->batch value also
potentially increased allocation latency while the PCP was refilled. This
sysctl only adjusts pcp->high so that zone->lock contention is potentially
reduced but allocation latency during a PCP refill remains the same.

# grep -E "high:|batch" /proc/zoneinfo | tail -2
high: 649
batch: 63

# sysctl vm.percpu_pagelist_high_fraction=8
# grep -E "high:|batch" /proc/zoneinfo | tail -2
high: 35071
batch: 63

# sysctl vm.percpu_pagelist_high_fraction=64
high: 4383
batch: 63

# sysctl vm.percpu_pagelist_high_fraction=0
high: 649
batch: 63

[mgorman@techsingularity.net: fix documentation]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210528151010.GQ30378@techsingularity.net

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210525080119.5455-7-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hdanton@sina.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

c49c2c47 28-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/page_alloc: limit the number of pages on PCP lists when reclaim is active

When kswapd is active then direct reclaim is potentially active. In
either case, it is possible that a zone would be balanced if pages were
not trapped on PCP lists. Instead of draining remote pages, simply limit
the size of the PCP lists while kswapd is active.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210525080119.5455-6-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hdanton@sina.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

3b12e7e9 28-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/page_alloc: scale the number of pages that are batch freed

When a task is freeing a large number of order-0 pages, it may acquire the
zone->lock multiple times freeing pages in batches. This may
unnecessarily contend on the zone lock when freeing very large number of
pages. This patch adapts the size of the batch based on the recent
pattern to scale the batch size for subsequent frees.

As the machines I used were not large enough to test this are not large
enough to illustrate a problem, a debugging patch shows patterns like the
following (slightly editted for clarity)

Baseline vanilla kernel
time-unmap-14426 [...] free_pcppages_bulk: free 63 count 378 high 378
time-unmap-14426 [...] free_pcppages_bulk: free 63 count 378 high 378
time-unmap-14426 [...] free_pcppages_bulk: free 63 count 378 high 378
time-unmap-14426 [...] free_pcppages_bulk: free 63 count 378 high 378
time-unmap-14426 [...] free_pcppages_bulk: free 63 count 378 high 378

With patches
time-unmap-7724 [...] free_pcppages_bulk: free 126 count 814 high 814
time-unmap-7724 [...] free_pcppages_bulk: free 252 count 814 high 814
time-unmap-7724 [...] free_pcppages_bulk: free 504 count 814 high 814
time-unmap-7724 [...] free_pcppages_bulk: free 751 count 814 high 814
time-unmap-7724 [...] free_pcppages_bulk: free 751 count 814 high 814

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210525080119.5455-5-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hdanton@sina.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

04f8cfea 28-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/page_alloc: adjust pcp->high after CPU hotplug events

The PCP high watermark is based on the number of online CPUs so the
watermarks must be adjusted during CPU hotplug. At the time of
hot-remove, the number of online CPUs is already adjusted but during
hot-add, a delta needs to be applied to update PCP to the correct value.
After this patch is applied, the high watermarks are adjusted correctly.

# grep high: /proc/zoneinfo | tail -1
high: 649
# echo 0 > /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu4/online
# grep high: /proc/zoneinfo | tail -1
high: 664
# echo 1 > /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu4/online
# grep high: /proc/zoneinfo | tail -1
high: 649

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210525080119.5455-4-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hdanton@sina.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

b92ca18e 28-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/page_alloc: disassociate the pcp->high from pcp->batch

The pcp high watermark is based on the batch size but there is no
relationship between them other than it is convenient to use early in
boot.

This patch takes the first step and bases pcp->high on the zone low
watermark split across the number of CPUs local to a zone while the batch
size remains the same to avoid increasing allocation latencies. The
intent behind the default pcp->high is "set the number of PCP pages such
that if they are all full that background reclaim is not started
prematurely".

Note that in this patch the pcp->high values are adjusted after memory
hotplug events, min_free_kbytes adjustments and watermark scale factor
adjustments but not CPU hotplug events which is handled later in the
series.

On a test KVM instance;

Before grep -E "high:|batch" /proc/zoneinfo | tail -2
high: 378
batch: 63

After grep -E "high:|batch" /proc/zoneinfo | tail -2
high: 649
batch: 63

[mgorman@techsingularity.net: fix __setup_per_zone_wmarks for parallel memory
hotplug]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210528105925.GN30378@techsingularity.net

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210525080119.5455-3-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hdanton@sina.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

bbbecb35 28-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/page_alloc: delete vm.percpu_pagelist_fraction

Patch series "Calculate pcp->high based on zone sizes and active CPUs", v2.

The per-cpu page allocator (PCP) is meant to reduce contention on the zone
lock but the sizing of batch and high is archaic and neither takes the
zone size into account or the number of CPUs local to a zone. With larger
zones and more CPUs per node, the contention is getting worse.
Furthermore, the fact that vm.percpu_pagelist_fraction adjusts both batch
and high values means that the sysctl can reduce zone lock contention but
also increase allocation latencies.

This series disassociates pcp->high from pcp->batch and then scales
pcp->high based on the size of the local zone with limited impact to
reclaim and accounting for active CPUs but leaves pcp->batch static. It
also adapts the number of pages that can be on the pcp list based on
recent freeing patterns.

The motivation is partially to adjust to larger memory sizes but is also
driven by the fact that large batches of page freeing via release_pages()
often shows zone contention as a major part of the problem. Another is a
bug report based on an older kernel where a multi-terabyte process can
takes several minutes to exit. A workaround was to use
vm.percpu_pagelist_fraction to increase the pcp->high value but testing
indicated that a production workload could not use the same values because
of an increase in allocation latencies. Unfortunately, I cannot reproduce
this test case myself as the multi-terabyte machines are in active use but
it should alleviate the problem.

The series aims to address both and partially acts as a pre-requisite.
pcp only works with order-0 which is useless for SLUB (when using high
orders) and THP (unconditionally). To store high-order pages on PCP, the
pcp->high values need to be increased first.

This patch (of 6):

The vm.percpu_pagelist_fraction is used to increase the batch and high
limits for the per-cpu page allocator (PCP). The intent behind the sysctl
is to reduce zone lock acquisition when allocating/freeing pages but it
has a problem. While it can decrease contention, it can also increase
latency on the allocation side due to unreasonably large batch sizes.
This leads to games where an administrator adjusts
percpu_pagelist_fraction on the fly to work around contention and
allocation latency problems.

This series aims to alleviate the problems with zone lock contention while
avoiding the allocation-side latency problems. For the purposes of
review, it's easier to remove this sysctl now and reintroduce a similar
sysctl later in the series that deals only with pcp->high.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210525080119.5455-1-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210525080119.5455-2-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Dave Hansen <dave.hansen@linux.intel.com>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hdanton@sina.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

151e084a 28-Jun-2021 Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>

mm: page_alloc: dump migrate-failed pages only at -EBUSY

alloc_contig_dump_pages() aims for helping debugging page migration
failure by elevated page refcount compared to expected_count. (for the
detail, please look at migrate_page_move_mapping)

However, -ENOMEM is just the case that system is under memory pressure
state, not relevant with page refcount at all. Thus, the dumping page
list is not helpful for the debugging point of view.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/YKa2Wyo9xqIErpfa@google.com
Signed-off-by: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
Reviewed-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Cc: Suren Baghdasaryan <surenb@google.com>
Cc: John Dias <joaodias@google.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

90249993 28-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/page_alloc: update PGFREE outside the zone lock in __free_pages_ok

VM events do not need explicit protection by disabling IRQs so update the
counter with IRQs enabled in __free_pages_ok.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210512095458.30632-10-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Peter Zijlstra (Intel) <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Chuck Lever <chuck.lever@oracle.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Cc: Jesper Dangaard Brouer <brouer@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Sebastian Andrzej Siewior <bigeasy@linutronix.de>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

df1acc85 28-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/page_alloc: avoid conflating IRQs disabled with zone->lock

Historically when freeing pages, free_one_page() assumed that callers had
IRQs disabled and the zone->lock could be acquired with spin_lock(). This
confuses the scope of what local_lock_irq is protecting and what
zone->lock is protecting in free_unref_page_list in particular.

This patch uses spin_lock_irqsave() for the zone->lock in free_one_page()
instead of relying on callers to have disabled IRQs.
free_unref_page_commit() is changed to only deal with PCP pages protected
by the local lock. free_unref_page_list() then first frees isolated pages
to the buddy lists with free_one_page() and frees the rest of the pages to
the PCP via free_unref_page_commit(). The end result is that
free_one_page() is no longer depending on side-effects of local_lock to be
correct.

Note that this may incur a performance penalty while memory hot-remove is
running but that is not a common operation.

[lkp@intel.com: Ensure CMA pages get addded to correct pcp list]

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210512095458.30632-9-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Peter Zijlstra (Intel) <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Chuck Lever <chuck.lever@oracle.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Cc: Jesper Dangaard Brouer <brouer@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Sebastian Andrzej Siewior <bigeasy@linutronix.de>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

56f0e661 28-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/page_alloc: explicitly acquire the zone lock in __free_pages_ok

__free_pages_ok() disables IRQs before calling a common helper
free_one_page() that acquires the zone lock. This is not safe according
to Documentation/locking/locktypes.rst and in this context, IRQ disabling
is not protecting a per_cpu_pages structure either or a local_lock would
be used.

This patch explicitly acquires the lock with spin_lock_irqsave instead of
relying on a helper. This removes the last instance of local_irq_save()
in page_alloc.c.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210512095458.30632-8-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Peter Zijlstra (Intel) <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Chuck Lever <chuck.lever@oracle.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Cc: Jesper Dangaard Brouer <brouer@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Sebastian Andrzej Siewior <bigeasy@linutronix.de>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

43c95bcc 28-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/page_alloc: reduce duration that IRQs are disabled for VM counters

IRQs are left disabled for the zone and node VM event counters. This is
unnecessary as the affected counters are allowed to race for preemmption
and IRQs.

This patch reduces the scope of IRQs being disabled via
local_[lock|unlock]_irq on !PREEMPT_RT kernels. One
__mod_zone_freepage_state is still called with IRQs disabled. While this
could be moved out, it's not free on all architectures as some require
IRQs to be disabled for mod_zone_page_state on !PREEMPT_RT kernels.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210512095458.30632-7-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Peter Zijlstra (Intel) <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Chuck Lever <chuck.lever@oracle.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Cc: Jesper Dangaard Brouer <brouer@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Sebastian Andrzej Siewior <bigeasy@linutronix.de>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

3e23060b 28-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/page_alloc: batch the accounting updates in the bulk allocator

Now that the zone_statistics are simple counters that do not require
special protection, the bulk allocator accounting updates can be batch
updated without adding too much complexity with protected RMW updates or
using xchg.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210512095458.30632-6-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Peter Zijlstra (Intel) <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Chuck Lever <chuck.lever@oracle.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Cc: Jesper Dangaard Brouer <brouer@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Sebastian Andrzej Siewior <bigeasy@linutronix.de>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

3ac44a34 28-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/vmstat: inline NUMA event counter updates

__count_numa_event is small enough to be treated similarly to
__count_vm_event so inline it.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210512095458.30632-5-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Peter Zijlstra (Intel) <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Chuck Lever <chuck.lever@oracle.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Cc: Jesper Dangaard Brouer <brouer@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Sebastian Andrzej Siewior <bigeasy@linutronix.de>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

f19298b9 28-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/vmstat: convert NUMA statistics to basic NUMA counters

NUMA statistics are maintained on the zone level for hits, misses, foreign
etc but nothing relies on them being perfectly accurate for functional
correctness. The counters are used by userspace to get a general overview
of a workloads NUMA behaviour but the page allocator incurs a high cost to
maintain perfect accuracy similar to what is required for a vmstat like
NR_FREE_PAGES. There even is a sysctl vm.numa_stat to allow userspace to
turn off the collection of NUMA statistics like NUMA_HIT.

This patch converts NUMA_HIT and friends to be NUMA events with similar
accuracy to VM events. There is a possibility that slight errors will be
introduced but the overall trend as seen by userspace will be similar.
The counters are no longer updated from vmstat_refresh context as it is
unnecessary overhead for counters that may never be read by userspace.
Note that counters could be maintained at the node level to save space but
it would have a user-visible impact due to /proc/zoneinfo.

[lkp@intel.com: Fix misplaced closing brace for !CONFIG_NUMA]

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210512095458.30632-4-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Peter Zijlstra (Intel) <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Chuck Lever <chuck.lever@oracle.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Cc: Jesper Dangaard Brouer <brouer@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Sebastian Andrzej Siewior <bigeasy@linutronix.de>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

dbbee9d5 28-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/page_alloc: convert per-cpu list protection to local_lock

There is a lack of clarity of what exactly
local_irq_save/local_irq_restore protects in page_alloc.c . It conflates
the protection of per-cpu page allocation structures with per-cpu vmstat
deltas.

This patch protects the PCP structure using local_lock which for most
configurations is identical to IRQ enabling/disabling. The scope of the
lock is still wider than it should be but this is decreased later.

It is possible for the local_lock to be embedded safely within struct
per_cpu_pages but it adds complexity to free_unref_page_list.

[akpm@linux-foundation.org: coding style fixes]
[mgorman@techsingularity.net: work around a pahole limitation with zero-sized struct pagesets]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210526080741.GW30378@techsingularity.net
[lkp@intel.com: Make pagesets static]

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210512095458.30632-3-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Peter Zijlstra (Intel) <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Chuck Lever <chuck.lever@oracle.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Cc: Jesper Dangaard Brouer <brouer@redhat.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Cc: Sebastian Andrzej Siewior <bigeasy@linutronix.de>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

28f836b6 28-Jun-2021 Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>

mm/page_alloc: split per cpu page lists and zone stats

The PCP (per-cpu page allocator in page_alloc.c) shares locking
requirements with vmstat and the zone lock which is inconvenient and
causes some issues. For example, the PCP list and vmstat share the same
per-cpu space meaning that it's possible that vmstat updates dirty cache
lines holding per-cpu lists across CPUs unless padding is used. Second,
PREEMPT_RT does not want to disable IRQs for too long in the page
allocator.

This series splits the locking requirements and uses locks types more
suitable for PREEMPT_RT, reduces the time when special locking is required
for stats and reduces the time when IRQs need to be disabled on
!PREEMPT_RT kernels.

Why local_lock? PREEMPT_RT considers the following sequence to be unsafe
as documented in Documentation/locking/locktypes.rst

local_irq_disable();
spin_lock(&lock);

The pcp allocator has this sequence for rmqueue_pcplist (local_irq_save)
-> __rmqueue_pcplist -> rmqueue_bulk (spin_lock). While it's possible to
separate this out, it generally means there are points where we enable
IRQs and reenable them again immediately. To prevent a migration and the
per-cpu pointer going stale, migrate_disable is also needed. That is a
custom lock that is similar, but worse, than local_lock. Furthermore, on
PREEMPT_RT, it's undesirable to leave IRQs disabled for too long. By
converting to local_lock which disables migration on PREEMPT_RT, the
locking requirements can be separated and start moving the protections for
PCP, stats and the zone lock to PREEMPT_RT-safe equivalent locking. As a
bonus, local_lock also means that PROVE_LOCKING does something useful.

After that, it's obvious that zone_statistics incurs too much overhead and
leaves IRQs disabled for longer than necessary on !PREEMPT_RT kernels.
zone_statistics uses perfectly accurate counters requiring IRQs be
disabled for parallel RMW sequences when inaccurate ones like vm_events
would do. The series makes the NUMA statistics (NUMA_HIT and friends)
inaccurate counters that then require no special protection on
!PREEMPT_RT.

The bulk page allocator can then do stat updates in bulk with IRQs enabled
which should improve the efficiency. Technically, this could have been
done without the local_lock and vmstat conversion work and the order
simply reflects the timing of when different series were implemented.

Finally, there are places where we conflate IRQs being disabled for the
PCP with the IRQ-safe zone spinlock. The remainder of the series reduces
the scope of what is protected by disabled IRQs on !PREEMPT_RT kernels.
By the end of the series, page_alloc.c does not call local_irq_save so the
locking scope is a bit clearer. The one exception is that modifying
NR_FREE_PAGES still happens in places where it's known the IRQs are
disabled as it's harmless for PREEMPT_RT and would be expensive to split
the locking there.

No performance data is included because despite the overhead of the stats,
it's within the noise for most workloads on !PREEMPT_RT. However, Jesper
Dangaard Brouer ran a page allocation microbenchmark on a E5-1650 v4 @
3.60GHz CPU on the first version of this series. Focusing on the array
variant of the bulk page allocator reveals the following.

(CPU: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5-1650 v4 @ 3.60GHz)
ARRAY variant: time_bulk_page_alloc_free_array: step=bulk size

Baseline Patched
1 56.383 54.225 (+3.83%)
2 40.047 35.492 (+11.38%)
3 37.339 32.643 (+12.58%)
4 35.578 30.992 (+12.89%)
8 33.592 29.606 (+11.87%)
16 32.362 28.532 (+11.85%)
32 31.476 27.728 (+11.91%)
64 30.633 27.252 (+11.04%)
128 30.596 27.090 (+11.46%)

While this is a positive outcome, the series is more likely to be
interesting to the RT people in terms of getting parts of the PREEMPT_RT
tree into mainline.

This patch (of 9):

The per-cpu page allocator lists and the per-cpu vmstat deltas are stored
in the same struct per_cpu_pages even though vmstats have no direct impact
on the per-cpu page lists. This is inconsistent because the vmstats for a
node are stored on a dedicated structure. The bigger issue is that the
per_cpu_pages structure is not cache-aligned and stat updates either cache
conflict with adjacent per-cpu lists incurring a runtime cost or padding
is required incurring a memory cost.

This patch splits the per-cpu pagelists and the vmstat deltas into
separate structures. It's mostly a mechanical conversion but some
variable renaming is done to clearly distinguish the per-cpu pages
structure (pcp) from the vmstats (pzstats).

Superficially, this appears to increase the size of the per_cpu_pages
structure but the movement of expire fills a structure hole so there is no
impact overall.

[mgorman@techsingularity.net: make it W=1 cleaner]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210514144622.GA3735@techsingularity.net
[mgorman@techsingularity.net: make it W=1 even cleaner]
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210516140705.GB3735@techsingularity.net
[lkp@intel.com: check struct per_cpu_zonestat has a non-zero size]
[vbabka@suse.cz: Init zone->per_cpu_zonestats properly]

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210512095458.30632-1-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210512095458.30632-2-mgorman@techsingularity.net
Signed-off-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@techsingularity.net>
Acked-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Acked-by: Peter Zijlstra (Intel) <peterz@infradead.org>
Cc: Chuck Lever <chuck.lever@oracle.com>
Cc: Jesper Dangaard Brouer <brouer@redhat.com>
Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
Cc: Sebastian Andrzej Siewior <bigeasy@linutronix.de>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@kernel.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

9660ecaa 28-Jun-2021 Heiner Kallweit <hkallweit1@gmail.com>

mm/page_alloc: switch to pr_debug

Having such debug messages in the dmesg log may confuse users. Therefore
restrict debug output to cases where DEBUG is defined or dynamic debugging
is enabled for the respective code piece.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/976adb93-3041-ce63-48fc-55a6096a51c1@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Heiner Kallweit <hkallweit1@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

ca891f41 28-Jun-2021 Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>

mm: constify get_pfnblock_flags_mask and get_pfnblock_migratetype

The struct page is not modified by these routines, so it can be marked
const.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210416231531.2521383-6-willy@infradead.org
Signed-off-by: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Reviewed-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Reviewed-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Reviewed-by: William Kucharski <william.kucharski@oracle.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

8bf6f451 28-Jun-2021 Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>

mm/page_owner: constify dump_page_owner

dump_page_owner() only uses struct page to find the page_ext, and
lookup_page_ext() already takes a const argument.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210416231531.2521383-4-willy@infradead.org
Signed-off-by: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Reviewed-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Reviewed-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Reviewed-by: William Kucharski <william.kucharski@oracle.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

be7c701f 28-Jun-2021 Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>

mm/debug: factor PagePoisoned out of __dump_page

Move the PagePoisoned test into dump_page(). Skip the hex print for
poisoned pages -- we know they're full of ffffffff. Move the reason
printing from __dump_page() to dump_page().

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210416231531.2521383-3-willy@infradead.org
Signed-off-by: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Reviewed-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Reviewed-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Reviewed-by: William Kucharski <william.kucharski@oracle.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

691d9497 28-Jun-2021 Aaron Tomlin <atomlin@redhat.com>

mm/page_alloc: bail out on fatal signal during reclaim/compaction retry attempt

A customer experienced a low-memory situation and decided to issue a
SIGKILL (i.e. a fatal signal). Instead of promptly terminating as one
would expect, the aforementioned task remained unresponsive.

Further investigation indicated that the task was "stuck" in the
reclaim/compaction retry loop. Now, it does not make sense to retry
compaction when a fatal signal is pending.

In the context of try_to_compact_pages(), indeed COMPACT_SKIPPED can be
returned; albeit, not every zone, on the zone list, would be considered in
the case a fatal signal is found to be pending. Yet, in
should_compact_retry(), given the last known compaction result, each zone,
on the zone list, can be considered/or checked (see
compaction_zonelist_suitable()). For example, if a zone was found to
succeed, then reclaim/compaction would be tried again (notwithstanding the
above).

This patch ensures that compaction is not needlessly retried irrespective
of the last known compaction result e.g. if it was skipped, in the
unlikely case a fatal signal is found pending. So, OOM is at least
attempted.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210520142901.3371299-1-atomlin@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Aaron Tomlin <atomlin@redhat.com>
Reviewed-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

d2f07ec0 28-Jun-2021 Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>

mm: make __dump_page static

Patch series "Constify struct page arguments".

While working on various solutions to the 32-bit struct page size
regression, one of the problems I found was the networking stack expects
to be able to pass const struct page pointers around, and the mm doesn't
provide a lot of const-friendly functions to call. The root tangle of
problems is that a lot of functions call VM_BUG_ON_PAGE(), which calls
dump_page(), which calls a lot of functions which don't take a const
struct page (but could be const).

This patch (of 6):

The only caller of __dump_page() now opencodes dump_page(), so remove it
as an externally visible symbol.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210416231531.2521383-1-willy@infradead.org
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210416231531.2521383-2-willy@infradead.org
Signed-off-by: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Reviewed-by: Vlastimil Babka <vbabka@suse.cz>
Reviewed-by: Anshuman Khandual <anshuman.khandual@arm.com>
Reviewed-by: William Kucharski <william.kucharski@oracle.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

7a22bdc3 28-Jun-2021 Kuan-Ying Lee <Kuan-Ying.Lee@mediatek.com>

kasan: add memory corruption identification support for hardware tag-based mode

Add memory corruption identification support for hardware tag-based mode.
We store one old free pointer tag and free backtrace instead of five
because hardware tag-based kasan only has 16 different tags.

If we store as many stacks as SW tag-based kasan does(5 stacks), there is
high probability to find the same tag in the stacks when out-of-bound
issues happened and we will mistake out-of-bound issue for use-after-free.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210626100931.22794-4-Kuan-Ying.Lee@mediatek.com
Signed-off-by: Kuan-Ying Lee <Kuan-Ying.Lee@mediatek.com>
Suggested-by: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrey Konovalov <andreyknvl@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <ryabinin.a.a@gmail.com>
Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com>
Cc: Chinwen Chang <chinwen.chang@mediatek.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Cc: Matthias Brugger <matthias.bgg@gmail.com>
Cc: Nicholas Tang <nicholas.tang@mediatek.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

a0503b8a 28-Jun-2021 Kuan-Ying Lee <Kuan-Ying.Lee@mediatek.com>

kasan: integrate the common part of two KASAN tag-based modes

1. Move kasan_get_free_track() and kasan_set_free_info() into tags.c
and combine these two functions for SW_TAGS and HW_TAGS kasan mode.

2. Move kasan_get_bug_type() to report_tags.c and make this function
compatible for SW_TAGS and HW_TAGS kasan mode.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210626100931.22794-3-Kuan-Ying.Lee@mediatek.com
Signed-off-by: Kuan-Ying Lee <Kuan-Ying.Lee@mediatek.com>
Suggested-by: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Suggested-by: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Reviewed-by: Andrey Konovalov <andreyknvl@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <ryabinin.a.a@gmail.com>
Cc: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>
Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com>
Cc: Chinwen Chang <chinwen.chang@mediatek.com>
Cc: Matthias Brugger <matthias.bgg@gmail.com>
Cc: Nicholas Tang <nicholas.tang@mediatek.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

f06f78ab 28-Jun-2021 Kuan-Ying Lee <Kuan-Ying.Lee@mediatek.com>

kasan: rename CONFIG_KASAN_SW_TAGS_IDENTIFY to CONFIG_KASAN_TAGS_IDENTIFY

Patch series "kasan: add memory corruption identification support for hw tag-based kasan", v4.

Add memory corruption identification for hardware tag-based KASAN mode.

This patch (of 3):

Rename CONFIG_KASAN_SW_TAGS_IDENTIFY to CONFIG_KASAN_TAGS_IDENTIFY in
order to be compatible with hardware tag-based mode.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210626100931.22794-1-Kuan-Ying.Lee@mediatek.com
Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210626100931.22794-2-Kuan-Ying.Lee@mediatek.com
Signed-off-by: Kuan-Ying Lee <Kuan-Ying.Lee@mediatek.com>
Suggested-by: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrey Konovalov <andreyknvl@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <ryabinin.a.a@gmail.com>
Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com>
Cc: Matthias Brugger <matthias.bgg@gmail.com>
Cc: Chinwen Chang <chinwen.chang@mediatek.com>
Cc: Nicholas Tang <nicholas.tang@mediatek.com>
Cc: Kuan-Ying Lee <Kuan-Ying.Lee@mediatek.com>
Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

cb32c9c5 28-Jun-2021 Daniel Axtens <dja@axtens.net>

kasan: use MAX_PTRS_PER_* for early shadow tables

powerpc has a variable number of PTRS_PER_*, set at runtime based on the
MMU that the kernel is booted under.

This means the PTRS_PER_* are no longer constants, and therefore breaks
the build. Switch to using MAX_PTRS_PER_*, which are constant.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210624034050.511391-5-dja@axtens.net
Signed-off-by: Daniel Axtens <dja@axtens.net>
Suggested-by: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu>
Suggested-by: Balbir Singh <bsingharora@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu>
Reviewed-by: Balbir Singh <bsingharora@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Andrey Konovalov <andreyknvl@gmail.com>
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <ryabinin.a.a@gmail.com>
Cc: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>
Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

af3751f3 28-Jun-2021 Daniel Axtens <dja@axtens.net>

kasan: allow architectures to provide an outline readiness check

Allow architectures to define a kasan_arch_is_ready() hook that bails out
of any function that's about to touch the shadow unless the arch says that
it is ready for the memory to be accessed. This is fairly uninvasive and
should have a negligible performance penalty.

This will only work in outline mode, so an arch must specify
ARCH_DISABLE_KASAN_INLINE if it requires this.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210624034050.511391-3-dja@axtens.net
Signed-off-by: Daniel Axtens <dja@axtens.net>
Reviewed-by: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Suggested-by: Christophe Leroy <christophe.leroy@csgroup.eu>
Reviewed-by: Andrey Konovalov <andreyknvl@gmail.com>
Cc: Balbir Singh <bsingharora@gmail.com>
Cc: Aneesh Kumar K.V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com>
Cc: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>
Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <ryabinin.a.a@gmail.com>
Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

336abff6 28-Jun-2021 Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>

kasan: use dump_stack_lvl(KERN_ERR) to print stacks

Most of the contents of KASAN reports are printed with pr_err(), so use a
consistent logging level to print the memory access stacks.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210506105405.3535023-2-glider@google.com
Signed-off-by: Alexander Potapenko <glider@google.com>
Reviewed-by: Marco Elver <elver@google.com>
Cc: Andrey Ryabinin <ryabinin.a.a@gmail.com>
Cc: Prasad Sodagudi <psodagud@quicinc.com>
Cc: Dmitry Vyukov <dvyukov@google.com>
Cc: he, bo <bo.he@intel.com>
Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
Cc: Petr Mladek <pmladek@suse.com>
Cc: Sergey Senozhatsky <senozhatsky@chromium.org>
Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org>
Cc: Yanmin Zhang <yanmin_zhang@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

a850e932 28-Jun-2021 Rafael Aquini <aquini@redhat.com>

mm: vmalloc: add cond_resched() in __vunmap()

On non-preemptible kernel builds the watchdog can complain about soft
lockups when vfree() is called against large vmalloc areas:

[ 210.851798] kvmalloc-test: vmalloc(2199023255552) succeeded
[ 238.654842] watchdog: BUG: soft lockup - CPU#181 stuck for 26s! [rmmod:5203]
[ 238.662716] Modules linked in: kvmalloc_test(OE-) ...
[ 238.772671] CPU: 181 PID: 5203 Comm: rmmod Tainted: G S OE 5.13.0-rc7+ #1
[ 238.781413] Hardware name: Intel Corporation PURLEY/PURLEY, BIOS PLYXCRB1.86B.0553.D01.1809190614 09/19/2018
[ 238.792383] RIP: 0010:free_unref_page+0x52/0x60
[ 238.797447] Code: 48 c1 fd 06 48 89 ee e8 9c d0 ff ff 84 c0 74 19 9c 41 5c fa 48 89 ee 48 89 df e8 b9 ea ff ff 41 f7 c4 00 02 00 00 74 01 fb 5b <5d> 41 5c c3 66 2e 0f 1f 84 00 00 00 00 00 0f 1f 44 00 00 f0 29 77
[ 238.818406] RSP: 0018:ffffb4d87868fe98 EFLAGS: 00000206
[ 238.824236] RAX: 0000000000000000 RBX: 000000001da0c945 RCX: ffffb4d87868fe40
[ 238.832200] RDX: ffffd79d3beed108 RSI: ffffd7998501dc08 RDI: ffff9c6fbffd7010
[ 238.840166] RBP: 000000000d518cbd R08: ffffd7998501dc08 R09: 0000000000000001
[ 238.848131] R10: 0000000000000000 R11: ffffd79d3beee088 R12: 0000000000000202
[ 238.856095] R13: ffff9e5be3eceec0 R14: 0000000000000000 R15: 0000000000000000
[ 238.864059] FS: 00007fe082c2d740(0000) GS:ffff9f4c69b40000(0000) knlGS:0000000000000000
[ 238.873089] CS: 0010 DS: 0000 ES: 0000 CR0: 0000000080050033
[ 238.879503] CR2: 000055a000611128 CR3: 000000f6094f6006 CR4: 00000000007706e0
[ 238.887467] DR0: 0000000000000000 DR1: 0000000000000000 DR2: 0000000000000000
[ 238.895433] DR3: 0000000000000000 DR6: 00000000fffe0ff0 DR7: 0000000000000400
[ 238.903397] PKRU: 55555554
[ 238.906417] Call Trace:
[ 238.909149] __vunmap+0x17c/0x220
[ 238.912851] __x64_sys_delete_module+0x13a/0x250
[ 238.918008] ? syscall_trace_enter.isra.20+0x13c/0x1b0
[ 238.923746] do_syscall_64+0x39/0x80
[ 238.927740] entry_SYSCALL_64_after_hwframe+0x44/0xae

Like in other range zapping routines that iterate over a large list, lets
just add cond_resched() within __vunmap()'s page-releasing loop in order
to avoid the watchdog splats.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210622225030.478384-1-aquini@redhat.com
Signed-off-by: Rafael Aquini <aquini@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Uladzislau Rezki (Sony) <urezki@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Aaron Tomlin <atomlin@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

12b9f873 28-Jun-2021 Uladzislau Rezki <urezki@gmail.com>

mm/vmalloc: fallback to a single page allocator

Currently for order-0 pages we use a bulk-page allocator to get set of
pages. From the other hand not allocating all pages is something that
might occur. In that case we should fallbak to the single-page allocator
trying to get missing pages, because it is more permissive(direct reclaim,
etc).

Introduce a vm_area_alloc_pages() function where the described logic is
implemented.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210521130718.GA17882@pc638.lan
Signed-off-by: Uladzislau Rezki (Sony) <urezki@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Matthew Wilcox (Oracle) <willy@infradead.org>
Reviewed-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hdanton@sina.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Oleksiy Avramchenko <oleksiy.avramchenko@sonymobile.com>
Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

f4bdfeaf 28-Jun-2021 Uladzislau Rezki (Sony) <urezki@gmail.com>

mm/vmalloc: remove quoted strings split across lines

A checkpatch.pl script complains on splitting a text across lines. It is
because if a user wants to find an entire string he or she will not
succeeded.

<snip>
WARNING: quoted string split across lines
+ "vmalloc size %lu allocation failure: "
+ "page order %u allocation failed",

total: 0 errors, 1 warnings, 10 lines checked
<snip>

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210521204359.19943-1-urezki@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Uladzislau Rezki (Sony) <urezki@gmail.com>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hdanton@sina.com>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Oleksiy Avramchenko <oleksiy.avramchenko@sonymobile.com>
Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

cd61413b 28-Jun-2021 Uladzislau Rezki (Sony) <urezki@gmail.com>

mm/vmalloc: print a warning message first on failure

When a memory allocation for array of pages are not succeed emit a warning
message as a first step and then perform the further cleanup.

The reason it should be done in a right order is the clean up function
which is free_vm_area() can potentially also follow its error paths what
can lead to confusion what was broken first.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210516202056.2120-4-urezki@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Uladzislau Rezki (Sony) <urezki@gmail.com>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hdanton@sina.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: Oleksiy Avramchenko <oleksiy.avramchenko@sonymobile.com>
Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

5c1f4e69 28-Jun-2021 Uladzislau Rezki (Sony) <urezki@gmail.com>

mm/vmalloc: switch to bulk allocator in __vmalloc_area_node()

Recently there has been introduced a page bulk allocator for users which
need to get number of pages per one call request.

For order-0 pages switch to an alloc_pages_bulk_array_node() instead of
alloc_pages_node(), the reason is the former is not capable of allocating
set of pages, thus a one call is per one page.

Second, according to my tests the bulk allocator uses less cycles even for
scenarios when only one page is requested. Running the "perf" on same
test case shows below difference:

<default>
- 45.18% __vmalloc_node
- __vmalloc_node_range
- 35.60% __alloc_pages
- get_page_from_freelist
3.36% __list_del_entry_valid
3.00% check_preemption_disabled
1.42% prep_new_page
<default>

<patch>
- 31.00% __vmalloc_node
- __vmalloc_node_range
- 14.48% __alloc_pages_bulk
3.22% __list_del_entry_valid
- 0.83% __alloc_pages
get_page_from_freelist
<patch>

The "test_vmalloc.sh" also shows performance improvements:

fix_size_alloc_test_4MB loops: 1000000 avg: 89105095 usec
fix_size_alloc_test loops: 1000000 avg: 513672 usec
full_fit_alloc_test loops: 1000000 avg: 748900 usec
long_busy_list_alloc_test loops: 1000000 avg: 8043038 usec
random_size_alloc_test loops: 1000000 avg: 4028582 usec
fix_align_alloc_test loops: 1000000 avg: 1457671 usec

fix_size_alloc_test_4MB loops: 1000000 avg: 62083711 usec
fix_size_alloc_test loops: 1000000 avg: 449207 usec
full_fit_alloc_test loops: 1000000 avg: 735985 usec
long_busy_list_alloc_test loops: 1000000 avg: 5176052 usec
random_size_alloc_test loops: 1000000 avg: 2589252 usec
fix_align_alloc_test loops: 1000000 avg: 1365009 usec

For example 4MB allocations illustrates ~30% gain, all the
rest is also better.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210516202056.2120-3-urezki@gmail.com
Signed-off-by: Uladzislau Rezki (Sony) <urezki@gmail.com>
Acked-by: Mel Gorman <mgorman@suse.de>
Cc: Hillf Danton <hdanton@sina.com>
Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
Cc: Nicholas Piggin <npiggin@gmail.com>
Cc: Oleksiy Avramchenko <oleksiy.avramchenko@sonymobile.com>
Cc: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

e8df2c70 28-Jun-2021 YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>

mm/dmapool: use DEVICE_ATTR_RO macro

Use DEVICE_ATTR_RO() helper instead of plain DEVICE_ATTR(), which makes
the code a bit shorter and easier to read.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210524112852.34716-1-yuehaibing@huawei.com
Signed-off-by: YueHaibing <yuehaibing@huawei.com>
Reviewed-by: Andy Shevchenko <andriy.shevchenko@linux.intel.com>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

33e3575c 28-Jun-2021 Liam Howlett <liam.howlett@oracle.com>

mm/mempolicy: use vma_lookup() in __access_remote_vm()

vma_lookup() finds the vma of a specific address with a cleaner interface
and is more readable.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210521174745.2219620-23-Liam.Howlett@Oracle.com
Signed-off-by: Liam R. Howlett <Liam.Howlett@Oracle.com>
Reviewed-by: Laurent Dufour <ldufour@linux.ibm.com>
Acked-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Davidlohr Bueso <dbueso@suse.de>
Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

3e418f98 28-Jun-2021 Liam Howlett <liam.howlett@oracle.com>

mm/memory.c: use vma_lookup() in __access_remote_vm()

Use vma_lookup() to find the VMA at a specific address. As vma_lookup()
will return NULL if the address is not within any VMA, the start address
no longer needs to be validated.

Link: https://lkml.kernel.org/r/20210521174745.2219620-22-Liam.Howlett@Oracle.com
Signed-off-by: Liam R. Howlett <Liam.Howlett@Oracle.com>
Reviewed-by: Laurent Dufour <ldufour@linux.ibm.com>
Acked-by: David Hildenbrand <david@redhat.com>
Acked-by: Davidlohr Bueso <dbueso@suse.de>
Cc: Geert Uytterhoeven <geert@linux-m68k.org>
Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>

5aaf07f0 28-Jun-2021 Liam Howlett <liam.howlett@oracle.com>

mm/mremap: use vma_lookup() in vma_to_resize()

Use vma_lookup() to find the VMA at a specific address. As vma_lookup()